'07 Whizzer clutch reinstall question.

Discussion in 'Whizzer Motorized Bicycles' started by del, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. del

    del Guest

    Howdy,

    Yesterday I took the Whizzer out for an errand run. It had very few miles on it. On the way home the clutch started to slip really bad. So I took a look at past articles here and, as always, Quenton was right. The cluch pads were glazed.

    But as I took it off the bike, parts began to fall on the ground. Three washers. Two steel and one brass. After a few iterations at running the bike after knocking off the glaze on the shoes, I'm still not sure which washer needs to go where.

    Any advice? The service manual and the on-line parts catalog were of no help.

    --del
     

  2. RdKryton

    RdKryton Active Member

    The 2 steel washers go on the bolt first, then the clutch and lastly the brass washer. On mine the brass washer has a step. The wide side goes away from the clutch. Hope this helps.

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2008
  3. del

    del Guest

    Thanks, Jim,

    It helped and it didn't... The clutch still binds up when I tighten the bolt. I checked the height of the 2 steel washers against the clutch bearing and they are not tall enough to stand above the side of the clutch. There must have been three washers and I've lost one.

    I've sent a message to the Whizzer folks in Texas to see if they have them. If all else fails I can go down into the basement, fire up the lathe, and make something.

    --del
     
  4. RdKryton

    RdKryton Active Member

    Try only using one steel washer. I also made a correction to my first post. Let us know.

    Jim
     
  5. Quenton Guenther

    Quenton Guenther Motored Bikes Sponsor

    Hi Del,
    I have lots of spacers for the auto clutch if needed. Be very careful not to over tighten the bolt holding the clutch to the arm. Use loctite on the bolt [be sure to let dry before use]. There are several ways to use the spacers [washers]depending on the clutch, the arm, and which bike it is used on. Some arms have a higher ridge where the bolt attaches the clutch and often a thin spacer is used between the clutch and arm, and the thicker brass and another thin washer are located between the bolt head and the clutch. Once the clutch is mounted the clutch should have a little side play [as little as possible]. If the belts don't run straight from the clutch to the flywheel pulley it might be a good idea to "mill" a small amount off the arm [ridge where bolt attaches] to move the clutch more towards the frame. It is also important to note that the spacers [washers] are a special size because it is important that the spacer only touch the center bearing race, not the entire bearing housing. So if you make your own spacers it might be wise to make them like the brass spacer, one side matching the bearing center and the other side wider for better support [also harder to "crush"].
    Hope this information helps.

    Whizzer OuterBanks LTD
    A North Carolina Corporation
    Quenton
     
  6. del

    del Guest

    I don't think that's gonna work, Jim.

    As it is, even with two washers, there's still not enough clearance to tighten down the bolt without the thing binding up with moving parts rubbing on fixed parts. That's not good.

    --del
     
  7. Quenton Guenther

    Quenton Guenther Motored Bikes Sponsor

    Hi Del, If you only use one steel washer between the clutch and the arm, does the clutch rub the arm? If not and you use the brass and the other steel washer between the bolt head and the clutch does the large washer rub against the clutch seal?

    Have Fun,
    Whizzer OuterBanks LTD
    A North Carolina Corporation
    Quenton
     
  8. del

    del Guest

    Howdy, Quenton,

    Your info, as always, has been quite valuable.

    Here's the bottom line, no matter how I arrange the brass and the two steel washers, only the brass washer is tall enough to keep the clutch from rubbing on either the arm or the big washer on the bolt. The two steel washers are not tall enough to "stand proud" of the clutch. So it'll rub on one side or the other.

    So, my guess is that I need another steel washer or two. (I most likely lost one...)

    Before I started the project, knowing how you insist on proper alignment of the pulleys and belts, I checked it out using a straight-edge and the alignment looked fine. So, my goal is to get back to that set-up, as close as I can.

    If I read you right, it doesn't matter much which washer goes on which side of the clutch. The important part is getting it to turn freely and to get the belts in line. Is that right?

    But, I'm still not sure about side-play in the mounted clutch. It looks to me like the bearings are press fit into the clutch so I can't see how any side play could be introduced if the clutch is bolted down tight enough to keep from falling off. What am I missing there?

    And, a note to any folks wanting to try this at home... The bolt on the clutch is Left Handed!!!

    thanks,
    --del
     
  9. del

    del Guest

    Ok, folks,
    This afternoon I went down into the basement, fired up the lathe, and made a new spacer. (It was the first time I'd run a machine tool since the cataract surgery. I'd forgotten how much fun it is....)

    It was too dark to reinstall the clutch when I was done (anyone want to have a contest for world's slowest machinist?) But it looks like it's gonna work just fine.

    Thanks all for the good info, and,
    Happy Whizzing...

    --del
     
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