2 weeks till i get motor

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by Albatross77, Apr 15, 2011.

  1. Albatross77

    Albatross77 Member

    48cc grubee skyhawk mounting on a Stingray occ chopper. Need to know>> WILL A 56 TOOTH REAR SPROCKET BE OK? I have read that I need a 50 tooth to clear the frame. I will be making my own engine mounts and exhaust so any help appreciated. (photos will be posted as I go):-/
     

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    Last edited: Apr 15, 2011

  2. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    a 50 tooth will give you tons of take off torque, but not very much top end speed.
    I have a 41 tooth on my o.c.c. chopper and i had no problems with chain clearance on the frame. you will have chain clearance issues on the rear brake caliper tho. I had to add a spacer under the left side of the brake caliper where it mounts to the frame and i had to bend the caliper up slightly where the cable goes into it, to clear the chain.
     
  3. Albatross77

    Albatross77 Member

    occ stingray set up

    Yeh kewl the kit comes with a 44 tooth sprocket so should be good thanks saved me some cash. My freind bought a barry mount for his stingray says in the instructions to cut some of the brake out extra bolts and bending sounds better to me.:idea: am thinking about making a shift kit an ideas with this? am making mount and exhaust on a tight budget plenty of steel and bike bits around and a welder
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2011
  4. Porkchop

    Porkchop Member

    I hope you've ridden that OCC Chopper enough to know they handle kind of awkward compared to normal bicycles. I got lucky 2 summers ago and found a new old stock chopper, but recently sold it as was. I decided not to motorize it due to some of the things I read about them. They do make a good looking motored bike though. To make a long story short, I'd go for the gearing that gave me lower end torque and not so much top end speed due to the handling characteristics of this particular bike. Be safe. Good luck with your build !
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 15, 2015
  5. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    my oc.c. chopper handles surprisingly well and i'm running a 41 tooth sprocket and i'm getting top end speeds around 32 mph.
    I think part of the handling issues with these bikes is the seat and the seat height. I replaced the original seat with a standard 10 speed seat, and i chopped the seatpost so the seat sits as low as it can in the frame. the 10 speed seat allows the rider to sit back a little further. the stock seat seems to push the rider forward a bit.
    I'm using the stock straight across drag bars on mine and i can tell you that my bike is simple to ride, and easy to control.
    I think rider weight and height may also have something to do with poor handling (i only weight 150 lbs. and i'm 5' 6" tall). I'm about the same size as the age group of kids that these bikes were designed for.
     
  6. Albatross77

    Albatross77 Member

    My other bike goes everywhere still ...getting close to 1000kms on the odometer (mainly on the beach) this chopper will be a cruiser. I like the look of the seat sitting back a bit and since I am tall will work well. Also have held onto the back rack of his motorised bike going full speed. I love the back tire on these things was the main reason for getting it and the price was right. Is there 2 sizes with the o.c.c chopper? Because mines bigger than my freinds. May even stretch it but it feels pretty good.
     
  7. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    yes there is a bigger occ chopper but it comes with a springer front end, front and rear disk brakes and the frame is longer. the frame is aluminum, and the wheels are the same as the standard occ chopper (20" rear, 24" front). It's called a spoiler.
    here's a link to what they look like.

    http://k-e-n.com/schwinnspoiler.html
     
  8. Albatross77

    Albatross77 Member

    WoW! I love the look of the spoiler! An alumunium frame with springer front end (drools) I am wondering if mine really is a schwinn stingray now... it doesnt have any stickers on it (my freinds ones are covered in em) its exactly the same as my freinds except longer and has a front disc. Oh yeah different gooseneck, stand sits more forward so back wheel sits up (front sits up on smaller one don't know if it does with a motor in it) and seat sits a little different but clearly better quality.
     

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    Last edited: Apr 19, 2011
  9. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    you have a standard o.c.c chopper bike frame and wheels there, but i think yours is an early version. the forks almost look like they're from a jesse james west coast chopper bike, but i'm not sure. the j.j. forks do not have a mount for a disk brake, unless someone welded one on.
    they may even be aftermarket forks that have a mount for a disk brake caliper welded on.
    the rest of your bike is standard schwinn o.c.c.
    I have a 2004 version (which looks exactly like yours) and my son has a 2006 version of the spider bike bike, his has a front fender, a front brake, and fold up highway pegs on the forks. His handlebars are different than the standard straight across drag bars. they also changed the peices on the front forks where they contact the frame. the early versions just have 2 allen head screws, screwed into the bottom triple tree, and the screw heads hit a rectangular pad on the bottom frame tube. this keeps the forks from actually hitting the frame.
    the later versions have little rubber pads on the frame that the forks hit when they are turned all the way.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2011
  10. Albatross77

    Albatross77 Member

    The Schwinn company filed for bankruptcy on September 11th 2001.
    They were bought out by an outfit called Pacific Cycles and the bikes were then made in China.
    Pacific introduced the Stingray Chopper, and decided to take a gamble on an adult size version.
    They went out on a limb with the high end Spoiler, and promptly went belly up.
    It was introduced for one model year, in 2005.
    Only 2000 of them were produced.
    Pacific Cycles was then sold.
    Schwinn bikes still exist, but they're little more than a badge on an inexpensive discount store bike.
    Sad but true<<<<<<<< Yes very sad
     
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