Bad cassette?

Discussion in 'Bicycle Repair' started by darwin, May 17, 2013.

  1. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    1st time I've ever had one go bad, it free wheels pedaling forward or reverse. Catches sometimes going forward but that's unacceptable. Good way to crush the family jewels pedaling hard on the top tube. I assume this cannot be repaired with anything less than a new cassette. The rims good. Its on a Schwinn link only a year old. How do I know I'm ordering the right part? Its mind boggling the choices there are. Only 2 things I'm sure of its 26in wh and 7sp cassette. Probably going to need that cassette tool also. Any ideas? Also does the nut[?] that the tool fits into just unscrew normally? RH thread, do I need to hold the cassette steady as that nut comes undone?
     

  2. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    I guess you could rebuild the pawls and springs, but most people buy a new wheel or relace a new cassette/hub onto their wheel.
    The lockring is standard threading (lefty loosey), you need that special tool, a big a.s.s.e.d. crescent wrench, and a chainwhip to remove.You don't need the chainwhip to replace.
     
  3. BigBlue

    BigBlue Active Member

  4. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    I used the wrong terminology, cassette is good its the freewheel that shot. Problem I'm having is the whole unit is generic and not name brand. If it were a shimano with a # getting the proper tool would be easy. Only ID is on the hub and it says quindao or some bs. I hate ordering stuff online then having to ship it back because its wrong, waste of time and money. I'm talking to a guy on craigs who has a bike shop run out of his garage. We'll see how that goes. Talked to another guy and he wanted $70 for a used 26in wheel. That's half the price of the bike. If I could ID the proper tool and freewheel I could do it myself for 30 to 40 bucks......life goes on.
     
  5. BigBlue

    BigBlue Active Member

    If you have a picture of the freewheel hub (freehub), it is a possibility that it could be identified. Unfortunately, the freehub has to match the axle. I had a hard time with my roadbike, but finally was able to find a replacement for a fraction of what it would have cost for a new axle with a freehub or wheelset. It also helps to figure out how the freehub is removed from the axle. It might be an A-class Feehub. A-class freehubs are usually on the cheaper axles/wheelsets. Again, unfortunately, you have to have a good tool selection to remove the A-class freehubs. I have a mini-lathe and was able to turn down a Harbor Freight 12mm hex head socket. 12mm hex wrenches are rare and expensive.

    http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/freehub-service

    Here's an instructional on the A-type freehub removal I found on the net. I don't know if it is your or not, but it might:
    https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&...Brt2ov&sig=AHIEtbSeqR3oATHB1Klt2Qtc2wseosD7rA

    Good Luck,

    Chris
    AKA: BigBlue
     
  6. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    When I needed a freewheel for my 1984 Fuji Opus, I googled the exact model/make, you should come across a brochure page (possibly in images) and they have a rundown of all the parts of the bike.Then it's to Ebay to find some NOS parts.The hardest part with the freewheel is, unlike a cassette where only the sprockets come off, it screws off and tightens back with chain torque, so getting it off may mean a trip to the LBS, may only cost $5 or so for them to do the work (if you have the part) of getting to old one off.
     
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