Best Grease for Whizzer New Departure Coaster brake?

Discussion in 'Whizzer Motorized Bicycles' started by Nolan, Sep 1, 2009.

  1. Nolan

    Nolan Member

    So the grease I have is liquifying and dripping out when I use the brake for a long time, does anyone know what kind of grease would work best? or a Drip point would be helpful.
    -Nolan
    PS New piston from MLC came today! Cylinder getting bored tomorrow!
     

  2. KilroyCD

    KilroyCD Active Member

    You need to use a good heat resistant grease, otherwise you can expect a grease that isn't up to the task to liquify. Shimano's Nexus Brake Grease is one of the most highly recommended. It's not cheap, as it sells for around $14.95 for a 100gram tube.
     
  3. Nolan

    Nolan Member

    Thanks, I went with a grease recommended for standard coaster brakes, it looks like it should work, its much thicker and hasn't started to drip.
     
  4. go-rebels

    go-rebels Member

    The Shimano Nexus Brake grease is best used on your retrofitted Shimano hub!
     
  5. KilroyCD

    KilroyCD Active Member

    Indeed it would be, but it would also be a very good choice for the New Departure brakes as they are capable of generating a good amount of heat when used on a motorized bike. I speak from experience there, as I had the standard brake grease liquify and leak out one summer on my '46 Columbia with a 48cc GruBee engine. That bike is fitted with a New Departure brake. After a ride that didn't have to be very long, you could burn your finger if you touched the hub. The brake inside the hub is a series of keyed discs (or washers if you prefer), and they can heat up quite a bit while riding.
     
  6. Quenton Guenther

    Quenton Guenther Motored Bikes Sponsor

    Hi KilRoyCD,

    Next time you take the new departure wheel apart [if ever], please let me know the sequence of the discs & plates. I rebuilt a new departure hub not long ago, and used a NOS kit with less spacers and thicker discs, but lost the original arrangement due to a few phone calls in the middle of the rebuild. To my surprise couldn't find any information or didn't have another New Departure hub in stock to compare it to, seems all on the shelves were Bendix hubs.

    Have fun,
     
  7. KilroyCD

    KilroyCD Active Member

    Quenton, I don't have a schematic, but here is a page from Shelon Brown's site which describes the sequence. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/coaster-brakes/new-departure.html . I hope this helps.
    I plan to tear down the ND Model D on my '36 Elgin, but with the other projects I've got going I'm not sure when I'll be able to get around to it.
     
  8. Quenton Guenther

    Quenton Guenther Motored Bikes Sponsor

    Hi KilRoyCD,
    The page doesn't tell how many and which starts first the #27 or #28. At least it shows eleven discs which is the problem. The NOS repair kit had thicker shoes and I don't think there were eleven, but instead there were ten. If I had paid attention when I removed the original discs I would have known how to install the kit, but I didn't.

    There is no rush because it is on my 99 and who needs to stop quickly anyway.

    See ya at Lewes, DE

    Have fun,
     
  9. KilroyCD

    KilroyCD Active Member

    Quenton, I found the answer to your question in the July / August issue of Classic Bicycle News. I'm going to scan the pages to .pdf files and e-mail them to you.
     
  10. Nolan

    Nolan Member

    Yeah, I took it apart and it looks like it was about to catch fire.. all the disks were totally charred. I put in some high temp grease that is good up to 150 degrees f and it it worked really good for a while then liquified, dripped out and now has very little breaking power again. I think it is mostly due because Ive been riding around downtown a lot, lots of stops and leaving the brake on.
    I think I'll have to step up to the 350 degree stuff
     
  11. Nolan

    Nolan Member

    Actually after rereading the tube, the stuff I have works up to 350 and is supposed to have a dropping point of 500 degrees. Anyone heard of a hub getting that hot? Also has anyone tried the heavyduty brake disk that come off ebay?
     
  12. KilroyCD

    KilroyCD Active Member

    Yes, I have heard of hubs getting quite hot. My hub got so hot once that it discolored. If it's getting that hot it indicates to me that the cone nut is adjusted a little too tight. Back it off a wee bit (like 1/4 of a turn) and see if things improve. But don't back it off too far. You don't want to have side to side play of any more than 1/32 of an inch. That's how I solved my problem.
     
  13. Quenton Guenther

    Quenton Guenther Motored Bikes Sponsor

    Sadly I purchased the HD kit and lost the sequence of disks and clutches. The HD kit has less parts because the disks are thicker. My rebuilt brake doesn't work well, but who needs to stop anyway!

    If you purchase the HD kit, please let me know the arrangement of the parts and how it works and I will try to fix my rear brake again.

    Have fun,
     
  14. KilroyCD

    KilroyCD Active Member

    Quenton, the information I have from a 1950s bike repair book is that you start and end with #27 discs, alternating with the #28 discs.
     
  15. Quenton Guenther

    Quenton Guenther Motored Bikes Sponsor

    Hi KilroyCD,

    Not sure what my problem is, but I looked and that is the way I installed them. When I get time I will remove the HD set and re-install the original parts and see what happens. I am sure I started and ended with the #27 discs, but I will re-check again when I get time.

    Have fun,
     
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