biggest engine on friction drive ?

Discussion in 'Friction Drive' started by DetonatorTuning, Sep 11, 2008.

  1. DetonatorTuning

    DetonatorTuning Active Member

    ok, who has some real power running thru a friction system ?

    what are the percieved limits and pitfalls ?

    yes, you know what i'm thinking - HEHEHE

    steve
     

  2. MotorBicycleRacing

    MotorBicycleRacing Well-Known Member

    Do it!
    Try a 1 5/8" to 1 3/4" roller

    Spinning the roller on the tire???? Maybe not as you are already used to
    applying the power gradually on the GEBE
     
  3. spad4me

    spad4me Member

    Try a 4 inch roller.
    Every body loves a friction drive UNTIL IT RAINS!!!
    The rear wheel is a spacer between the roller and the pavement.
    I hate tequilla as well as the maggot in mezzzcal. UUUUUGGGGGHHHH!
    Jack Daniels or beer with BBQ chicken thighs 4 me
     
  4. s_beaudry

    s_beaudry Member

    DT,

    Read a post maybe two weeks ago about a guy who fabricated his own friction setup and had a pretty big 81cc engine on it. It looked to be shaped like a B&S horizontal shaft engine, maybe ~30 pounds or so!

    I am thinking with a strong enough mount, one could easily run a 6.5hp B&S as a friction drive with a centrifugal clutch and maybe easily a 2, 3, or 4 inch roller on it.

    Any volunteers???
     
  5. heathyoung

    heathyoung Member

    Why use only one roller? Chain-drive multiple rollers to increase the surface area in contact with the tyre - two would be easy, 3 requires more careful alignment in respect to tyre diametre.

    It would require a little more thought in the design stages, but its certainly not impossible. It would be easier to implement that a curved/profiled roller (which again is dependent on tyre geometry.
     
  6. SirJakesus

    SirJakesus Guest

    Haha, DT are you just trying to make the most insanely high powered of every type of system? :) good for you.

    I can see how a high powered friction setup would be a total blast, they're so light and simple that the thing would FLY and be really reliable. However if you were always rough on the throttle you'd probably burn tires up faster than with a lesser powered motor. I havent experienced the slippage issues yet as I dont usually ride when it's wet. And if I was to I'd ride my xr75 with chain drive and fenders anyhow.
     
  7. SirJakesus

    SirJakesus Guest

    Haha, DT are you just trying to make the most insanely high powered of every type of system? :) good for you.

    I can see how a high powered friction setup would be a total blast, they're so light and simple that the thing would FLY and be really reliable. However if you were always rough on the throttle you'd probably burn tires up faster than with a lesser powered motor. I havent experienced the slippage issues yet as I dont usually ride when it's wet. And if I was to I'd ride my xr75 with chain drive and fenders anyhow.
     
  8. DetonatorTuning

    DetonatorTuning Active Member

    no, i'm not really trying to break every system out there, but, yes it had occured to me that a friction drive does have some very attractive attributes.

    other input seems to lean toward a real life threshold of about 2.2HP though i think the dual roller idea has some merrit.

    i'm not really a very original builder, i tend to look for other ways to use stuff that's around.

    i am coming to terms with the Staton verticle gear drive and getting some good speed and sustainability. it took some trial and error for the bracing alignment to stay put.

    steve
     
  9. kerf

    kerf Guest

    I love my chain drive but the friction units have a special place in my heart. When my wife and I both were running friction drives, both would ride in my 2" receiver mount bike rack. Not the case with the chain drive due to being tail heavy. We're heading to the coast for a few days and I want to take my bike, trouble is how. Could take the 3/4 ton truck, pull the trailer 600 miles or forget the whole thing. Decided to take the bike apart and stuff it in the back of the Pacifica. With a friction drive, there would be no question, pop'm on the rack and go.
     
  10. JemmaUK

    JemmaUK Guest

    There was at one time a two speed friction design. The idea being that there was a two position selection position for the mount and two different sized rollers.

    The idea was that the primary roller would be used to start and run to mid speed, the second position (gear) would then be selected which would give higher speed running...

    So long as the motor was running both rollers at the same time it would just be a matter of making up the mount to be dual position.

    Jemma xx
     
  11. Eco Speeder

    Eco Speeder Member

    My 43cc with velocity stack and manifold spacer was pretty pimped. Besides the operating pitfalls (i,e wet road) it worked great when dialed in. But the system required constant tweaking. Drive roller to tire gap, tweaking the drive roller PTO so the drive wheels would not lose power by spinning on the shaft, ect. An then there';s the dynamic of the tire being ground down and reshaped so the handling properties of the bike are constantly changing. And not for the better.

    I differ with the statement that friction drive is "simple and light weight". Hogwash. GEBE is simple and light weight. I grin every time I look at my back tire which has seen 1000+ miles and it has the tread remaining of a friction drive that has gone 70- miles. I had to do a bit of engineering for my pimped motor to work with the GEBE drive ring but those efforts were minimal compared to the near constant thinking /wrenching on the friction to keep it at peak performance.
     
  12. kerf

    kerf Guest

    If you're getting only 70 miles from a tire, you must not know what you're doing. I had no problem getting 800+ off my Staton TLE43. Wife is still running one of my old tires and it has plenty of miles to go. When you set the roller tension, apply just enough load so the roller won't slip while holding the bike and going WOT.
     
  13. Eco Speeder

    Eco Speeder Member

    Kerf,

    Either you were a bit ADD reading my post or i was not being understandable. I was comparing the tire wear of 70 miles of friction drive to 1000+ miles of belt drive. After 1000+ miles the tire has near all its meat left.

    And there is the concept of setting the drive roller gap set so the drive wheels don't spin on the PTO. That is fine if one is down with having and working around a slipping clutch dynamic. For me I like to have all the power from the PTO making it's way to where the rubber turns on the pavement.

    If it were not for engineering laziness, wood wheel friction drive makers might have come up with a keyed shaft to mate with the drive wheel. Not as good as belt or chain drive but would be a huge improvement.


    Michael
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2008
  14. kerf

    kerf Guest

    Then you were and are running a direct drive? No centrifugal clutch on friction or GEBE, one bad dude.
     
  15. MotorBicycleRacing

    MotorBicycleRacing Well-Known Member

    What kind of friction drive were you using?
    Thanks
     
  16. SirJakesus

    SirJakesus Guest

    I don't see how it could get any more simple and lightweight than friction drive. Theres no drive train to worry about at all except for how much pressure is placed on the wheel. You never have to worry about replacing belts or lubing chains or breaking spokes due to some of the arsebackward mounting schemes some chain and all belt drive kits use. If I get 800 to 1000 miles out of a tire then switch it out in 20 minutes to me thats no big deal at all. It's worth not having the headache of other more complex systems at times.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 13, 2008
  17. kerf

    kerf Guest

    Well, our experience has been very similar.
     
  18. Eco Speeder

    Eco Speeder Member


    Funny, since i left friction drive behind my headaches went away.
     
  19. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    I love friction drive!

    I love friction drive so much that I use two of them on one bike.:shock: I don't think too much, I just bolt 'em on, adjust the rollers once in awhile and enjoy the ride. No need to worry about busting spokes, and I use stock 14g ones on my bike "Mr. Hyde".

    It's a major spindle resistance drag, though, but I'm working on that.

    And in 61 years, I might've had 3 headaches.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 13, 2008
  20. MotorBicycleRacing

    MotorBicycleRacing Well-Known Member

    What kind/brand of friction drive were you using?
    Thanks
     
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