Bikemotorparts 1.50" rubber drive roller

Discussion in 'Friction Drive' started by cpuaid, Oct 21, 2009.

  1. cpuaid

    cpuaid Member

    has anyone used the new 1.5" rubber drive roller from BMP? if so, what top speed are you getting with your particular engine setup. curious as to how well it performs in comparison to a typical knurled metal roller. it's currently $36 with free shipping.
     

    Attached Files:


  2. andyszyd

    andyszyd Member

    I inquired with BMP about 1.5" rubber roller asking if it is better for wet conditions than metal roller, they told me it slips more than knurled roller when wet.
    As for speed you are going to get about 20% more speed comparing to 1.25 roller, assuming your engine can keep produce enough torque, so if you are doing 30 MPH with 1.25 roller, you can reach 36 MPH with same engine RPM.
     
  3. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    I installed a 1.375" Staton friction roller in my BMP friction drive. When the roller broke:whistling:, I installed a Staton 1.5" roller.

    I also broke that roller:whistling:, so now I'll install the BMP 1.5" rubber roller. I'll let you know how this rubber roller compares with the Staton rollers.
     
  4. andyszyd

    andyszyd Member

    I am curious how this BMP rubber roller will perform for you.
    How is the traction and wear of the roller and tire, comparing to metal rollers, obviously it will take some run time to evaluate it.
     
  5. cpuaid

    cpuaid Member

    5-7HEAVEN, did you have support brackets on both sides of your rack when you had the broken roller issue? hard to believe that your Staton roller broke. it should have been the hardest roller on the market. i also have a Staton 1.50" roller and aside from the knurls being slightly worn, it's been holding up well so far. i only have the single bar support on my staton kit. i know the BMP rubber roller is going to slip when wet but was just curious if the speed was going to be comparable to a 1.50" knurled roller.
     
  6. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    cpu, I have modified Staton old-style single rear strut. I should install the left-side strut for stability.

    I have two more used Staton rollers as spares.
     
  7. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    Well, I installed two Staton single-action rear support struts. I also replaced the BMP friction housing, since it was carved up to accept the Dominator expansion pipe. I'm using stock exhaust now, so replacing the housing seemed prudent. I also installed the quick-release skewer to stabilize the friction housing. Everthing was very solid now.

    A BMP 1.5" friction roller was also mounted on the new BMP housing. My Staton friction rollers were really chewing up the rear tire, so I figured that a hard-rubber friction roller would work better.

    Sadly, in 20-something miles, the 1.5" rubber roller is showing premature wear and so is the rear tire. I blew the 460 engine this morning, so when I tear it down I'll measure how much wear there is on the rubber roller.:detective:
     
  8. cpuaid

    cpuaid Member

    man i was really worried about that when you told me it was made out of rubber instead of urethane. sorry to hear about your bad luck but you've helped out a lot of people with your experience with this thing. i almost placed an order this morning with BMP on this roller... :(
     
  9. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    For 2.2hp or less engines, this BMP rubber roller would probably work.

    I've tried two BMP 1.25" steel friction rollers with one-way bearings. BOTH bearings locked up while riding; it wasn't a big deal coasting downhill, because the 460 engines are good for 11,000 rpm plus.

    The BMP steel rollers have a smoother, less aggressive friction surface. I'll try the 1.25" one again.

    First I have to find a long-shank T27 or T30 torx driver so I can repair the engine. Lost compression on a five-mile ride, need to pull the cylinder/head.:ack2:
     
  10. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    I just removed and measured the BMP 1.5" hard rubber friction roller.

    After two days and maybe 25 miles' use, the roller's diameter wore down from 1.5" to 1.125".:ack2:

    There was fine rubber dust on the seatstay frames, which I thought was from the tire.

    It was from the tire ANNND the hard rubber friction roller. :ack2:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 15, 2009
  11. cpuaid

    cpuaid Member

    ouch!!! that is some major excessive wearing down of the rubber roller! daily hard commuting has also taken it's toll on my GEBE system so i'm thinking about going to a chain drive myself. Titan anyone?
     
  12. andyszyd

    andyszyd Member

    Yea, if you want to go coast to coast, or even around the world, the only combo to use is probably chain drive powered by one of the following:

    Honda GX50
    Mitsu TLE 43, Mitsu 47 ( 47 not available in US yet)
    Tanaka 40

    Titan? That would be my last choice for such a demanding task since the difference between Honda 50 and Titan is only about 100 bucks.
     
  13. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    Did their warranty cover the wasted roller?
     
  14. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    Never bothered to ask.
     
  15. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    I just got an email reply from BMP :

    Thank you for your interest in our kit. At your weight you can use even a small engine like the GX35. The HF is excellent but for the same price you can get the GX35. You would be best off with the 1.25" roller, it has plenty of speed. The 1.5" urethane roller is not something we manufacture, we basically buy it at cost so that is why we don't include it in our packages. Also it is not that popular, the steel works better.

    Thanks again,

    James Brisciana
    Website: www.bikemotorparts.com
    Email: info@bikemotorparts.com
    Tel: 518-772-4592
     
  16. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    The BMP 1.25" roller works well enough, although its friction surface is not as aggressive as Staton's. I imagine it is also not something they manufacture. More than likely, it is a component of conveyor belt design, but works okay for friction driven MB's.

    Staton friction spindle surface is very aggressive and firmly grips tire tread. I was pleasantly surprised when I was able to incorporate Staton rollers in the BMP friction housings. All it took was removing the BMP assembled driveshaft and 1/2" ID bearings and replacing them with Staton assembly, including the 5/8" ID bearings. Since there is no outboard collar to retain the bearing, you would have to fab a simple bearing retainer. Either that, or install both bearings with the circlips on the inside of the BMP friction housing.:idea:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 31, 2010
  17. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    I think the "knurled" surface is not the best pattern for traction. It is probably a compromise in manufacturing costs and tire wear.

    I wonder why there aren't any rollers with a smoothed "cog" type surface and hard rubber tires that match, sort of like lawn mower wheels with the toothed cogs that turn them on cheap self-drive TEcumseh mowers.
     
  18. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 2, 2010
  19. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    Happy those kinds of treads will wear quickly with a friction drive because of lack of surface area in contact with the roller, especially with a steel knarled roller. When I put my bmp kit together with a new mountain bike I left the original tire on it and within 25 miles you could see alot of wear on the tire. When replaced by a semislick after 500 miles theres little noticeable wear. With the semi slick you get better traction too with the roller against the tire. http://www.niagaracycle.com/product_info.php?products_id=1388
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2010
  20. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    On my dimesion edge setup I have a choice of using 4 different urethane rollers and you can change them out in 3 minutes even on the road. After 2 years im still waiting for the 1- 1/4 roller to wear out. Thats the roller I use 99% of the time because of speed and torgue it offers. Ive never even used the 1-3/4 roller because whatever speed it will go is too fast for me. The 1-1/2 roller is fast enough but it cuts way down on the hill climbing power and I live on a lil mountain. These rollers last forever though and have minimum wear on tires.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2010
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