Brakes brake pads or v brake

Discussion in 'Bicycle Repair' started by oldpot, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. oldpot

    oldpot Member

    This is the set up i got on my front wheel, side brakes and a band brake on the back ,


    [​IMG]

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    now these brakes are ok in dry weather and if i start stopping way ahead of time ,but other day i was in the rain and the front brake did not stop that great , i asking what better brake pads can i use for this set up , or been thinking about better brakes , drum or disk are out as they cost way to much least $150 for them , been thinking about v brakes (if there batter that these i got on now , can i use , i seen v brake brackets $24 can this work instead of a bracket , if not any other way of getting v brakes on this bike .

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Black-Cycling-MTB-Bicycle-Part-Bike-V-Brake-Cantilever-Brake-Booster-/300665303830?pt=US_Brakes&hash=item46010c7316
     

  2. Jeckler

    Jeckler New Member

    I just put a side pull caliper brake on my cruiser. There is a night and day difference between that and the v-brake on my comfort bike. I'm not sure if it's due to the glossy paint on the cruiser's rims, but they do not work well. That booster you linked to is for existing v-brakes and is supposed to keep the fork legs from spreading under load. You need either an adapter plate, brake mounts and find someone to weld them on, or a new fork with mounts already attached. Option 1 is kinda cheesy. The only adapters I've seen use hose clamps to attach to the lower fork leg.
    If you wanted to experiment with different pads, I read somewhere (Harris Cyclery most likely) that the kool stop salmon pads are one of the best. I don't have personal experience with them though.
     
  3. motman812

    motman812 Member

  4. oldpot

    oldpot Member

    ty jeckler and motman , i will check them brakes out i read before there good brakes but forgot what they was called , then take it from there if they better i might leave it at that.
     
  5. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    The only, and i say the "ONLY" safe braking system for motorized bicycles is a full disk brake system with a significantly over sized front disk brake rotor and at least an Avid BB7 mechanical caliper.

    Any other method is simply a suicidal option.
     
  6. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    Side-pull calipers only work well on skinny rims, a good V pull should do ya.Disc would be cool, but not all bikes are made for a retrofit (and too costly) certainly not "necessary".Riding a bike of any kind is a bit dangerous regardless of braking system, being a good rider, with forethought will get you out of most surprises.
     
  7. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    If the bike can't be retrofitted with disk brakes, then it's time to get a new bike that has disk brakes as standard equipment.
     
  8. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    We're gonna have to agree to disagree on this one.If you NEED disc brakes, maybe you NEED to slow down a little.There's a point where the brakes, dependent on speed, will either cause a skid, or on a diamond frame, pitch you over the bars.V brakes are quite capable of this.The only true benefit I see is for long steep downhill grades, and the lack of wear to the rim.If someone walks in front of you, or a car pulls in front V or disc is gonna stop you fine.
    The choice of brakes is under the riders discretion, if you have the balance and reaction time even calipers would be fine, just adjust speed for the given situation.The only thing I would say is dangerous is bendix, though as a child we bombed the fireroads in Sbdo Ca and lived to tell the tales.
     
  9. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member


    Not true.
    When rim brakes become wet, they are totally useless at slowing the bike down, even without an engine fitted.

    When a bike hits a decent pothole and buckles the rim but it can still rotate freely, rim brakes will be unable to safely stop the bike under this scenario, yet a disk brake system will still safely bring the bike to a stop.

    Simply put, disk brakes are the "only" safe option.
     
  10. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    Valid points for sure.My opinion would lie in the facts that:
    1) When it's raining/wet most sensible people slow down to meet road conditions
    2) We don't regularly "hit" potholes, we avoid them.
    Preparing for every possible scenario is overkill in my book, may as well wrap yourself in Nerf.Remember this is from a person who doesn't wear a helmet, I'm more concerned with covering up from the sun, as I'm sure odds are, we're going to have to deal with skin cancer rather than bike accidents.
    Do a little stat taking here, who rides with disc, who rides with anything else (not including Bendix/coaster), and then see if there are any more wrecks/accidents due to not using disc.My guess is any difference will be negligible.
     
  11. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    Disk brakes covers just about every scenario, and for the few scenarios that are not covered, the bike would most likely be doing cart wheels down the road, and as we all know, even disk brakes don't work if the wheels are in the air and cruising along at altitude.

    Facts are that rim brakes don't work at all when the rim and pads are wet - going slow makes little difference, and lets be realistic: when it's raining, people on motorized bicycles tend to speed up (trying to get home as quickly as possible) to avoid getting totally drowned, thereby making rim brakes even more lethal.

    and

    we do sometimes hit potholes when we are not able to avoid them, and those potholes tend to be the worst kind because they're the type you are desperately trying to avoid but can't.

    Basic facts:

    Cars have disk brakes
    Most motorbikes have disk brakes (for good reason)
    Aeroplanes have disk brakes (sometimes lots and lots of them)

    and even the Space Shuttle and Indian Taxis have disk brakes.


    are we seeing a trend that could be relevant to disk brakes being the better solution?
     
  12. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    You are most certainly smarter than I am, and I'm not arguing they aren't superior, I'm calling you on they're the ONLY safe option, and here's how I'll prove it.Fabian, if there was no way you could ever get your hands on disc for bikes, only V or calipers,...
    would you stop riding MAB's ??
     
  13. professor

    professor Active Member

  14. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    I would do what i am trying to do now (because a 9 inch Hayes V9 disk rotor and Avid BB7 caliper isn't powerful enough for my requirements): attempting to modify a hydraulic brake caliper and master cylinder from a scooter to fit on my motorized bicycle, then have a bespoke 10 inch disk rotor machined up by a guy who manufactures custom motorcycle disk rotors.
     
  15. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    Beautiful political style dodge, ask a simple question, get fluff.First you say, "the ONLY safe option" regarding everyone, now it's "for my applications".Not everyone rides with your applications, you're the only one I've seen doing big hauls.
    So computer style "garbage in garbage out" if there wasn't ANY WAY to put ANY disc brakes on an MAB you wouldn't ride??That is a simple "yes-no" question, don't fluff it, answer yes or no.
     
  16. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    Simple answer, i would not ride a motorized bicycle if it did not have disk brakes.

    My first motorized bicycle had rim brakes. I rode it less than 30 meters and turned around, headed back up the street and parked it in my garage; ripped the engine out of the frame and went to my local bicycle shop, had a look around and purchased a bicycle with front and rear disk brakes, upon which the next move was to motorized it with a SickBikeParts shift kit because the stock single speed drive system was less than useless.
     
  17. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    OK.I guess 99.9% of us are suicidal.
     
  18. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    Pad, Drum, Disc, In that order. I only wish I could afford disc brakes for my bike. And Fabian is right about pads not holding well when wet. But I cheat a little, I have a car and try not to ride in the rain. If I get stuck in the rain I just slow way down and get a little wet. Sure, Disc's will lock it up when wet, but if the road is wet ya don't really want to lock it up anyway. Yer just gonna slide out.(unless ya got a 6" wide tire on the pavement.) A 2 1/4" wide tire just ain't gonna hold on a wet road no matter what brake your using.
    Not a lot of folks can afford a $500-$1000 bike with disc brakes. Most just want a semi-reliable bike too get around town on. Yeah, pads are less effective when wet, But they will still stop you better than a coaster which is what a lot of silly people use. Every time I've hit the coaster in an emergency I dumped it. I put cantilevers on the front and haven't had a problem since.
    So Fabian, If ya wanna send me a complete 1" fork, wheel and disc setup for my Cranny, or enough cash to do it myself, Feel free to do so. Untill then I gotta stick with my pads.
    Big Red.
     
  19. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    Red, you suicidal fool (wink)!Just kidding.I just took issue with Fabian stating the only option is disc.We're riding bikes not 500lb rice rockets.I think a bunch of us here remember or have driven an old car with drum brakes.When they're wet they "hit the wall" meaning where you had 4 inches of hydraulic push you now have 1 inch and then they lock, so you had to adjust your braking technique, it wasn't that they didn't work when wet.The fixie dudes (the good ones) can do the foot stop stopping better than my Vee's.To each their own, riding technique adjusted to road conditions (IE slowing the H.e.l.l. down) is the key.
     
  20. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    I guess you could use that ONLY if you can get the bracket to hold very firm on the forks. Any "give" in it will translate to braking loss. The 1" headset forks with the cantilever bosses on them are not too hard too find. What I put on my bike is the 1" headset, with cantilevers bosses and shocked forks. Forks like that with shocked forks are a little harder to fine.
    I had calipers like yours on my bike for a while. I found that at 30-35mph it puts too much stress on the arms and mount bolt. The entire assembly would tweek with the stress and snap the mount bolt. Not a good thing at 35mph. These were made for pedal bikes that do 15mph tops. Most faster bikes have cantilevers or Disc.
    I'll post a pic of the forks I put on my bike.
    Big red.
     

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