Carb Problems

Discussion in '2-Stroke Engines' started by Ratfink, Oct 5, 2008.

  1. Ratfink

    Ratfink New Member

    I have built an Electra Rat Fink and was wondering how important it is to have the carb level? Thanks
     

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  2. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    well - a level (most of the time) carb is recommended

    but -- if it's running OK

    Ride That Thing Ratfink -----------MM
     
  3. Ratfink

    Ratfink New Member

    Carb Prob

    Does not run well on the top end.
     
  4. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    if you think that it may be starving for gas

    maybe hold the bike off ground so as to have carb level

    in gear -- does high end seem better ?


    probably -- lack of fuel -- or -- lack of spark

    got that one covered -- that's all there is to making it go !!!!

    ride that thing Mountainman
     
  5. s_beaudry

    s_beaudry Member

    Very nice build you have....

    Is that a straight pipe only for the exhaust system? Any backpressure or heat issues running this way?
     
  6. Ratfink

    Ratfink New Member

    Yes and none thus far.
     
  7. Last edited: Oct 5, 2008
  8. BSA

    BSA Guest

    I'd imagine there would be a fair bit of back pressure, as that pipe is quite thin.

    BSA
     
  9. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    all 2-strokers who wish to change their exhaust systems

    SHOULD TAKE A LOOK AT THAT FIRST !!!

    these computers are great -- A GOOD FIND THERE !!!

    ride that thing Mountainman
     
  10. QuadManiac

    QuadManiac Member

    True... but it's not back pressure causing that scavenging and return of fuel/air mixture to the combustion chamber, as shown in the animation, it's the reflected pressure wave from the expansion chamber due to an increase in the resistance to flow at the rear conical section (a reflection due to an impedence change for you engineers) . And I doubt that anybody thinks that the HT exhaust/muffler is in ANY way designed as an expansion chamber. It's simply an exhast pipe and muffler that acts as a resistance to flow (causing some back pressure) but certainly not tuned to return a pressure wave.

    Interestingly.. i wanted to move my muffler back to the rear wheel, so i got about a 3' length of 3/4 ID silicone heater hose, cut the stock pipe just below the bend and clamped on the heater hose. I then routed the heater hose back to above the kick stand where it's clamped to the stock muffler which is then mounted to the left rear wheel stud.

    I really expected my performance to decrease due to increased back pressure.. I was pleasantly surprised! Suddenly my torque went up significantly, the high RPM sputtering stopped and the engine sounds more like some of my expansion chambered 2-stroke motorcycle engines. I wonder if it's just the additional back pressure, or whether the rubber tubing actually expands and contracts during each pressure pulse, returning a pressure wave of sorts to the exhaust port as a tuned chamber would? Kind of like an active expansion chamber? I may do a few experiments to get more information. Regardless, the engine's performance and 'smoothness' has improved across nearly the entire RPM range. Could I have a new idea here? I'm going to replace the heater hose with thinwall conduit with a similar ID. If the performance improvements are still there, i think i can just chalk it up to increased back pressure.. if they go away, i think the rubber tubing might just be a great accidental find and, of course, i'll go back to it!

    Anyway... without at least a reasonable amount of back pressure, you will be exhausting a significant amount of the fuel/air mixture, reducing fuel economy, increasing the heating of the exhaust system and increasing emissions.

    Good luck with your build!
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2008
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