Chains Chain keeps snapping! Please help!

Discussion in 'Transmission / Drivetrain' started by billpb1222, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. billpb1222

    billpb1222 New Member

    hi guys,

    I finally got my schwinn occ 80cc started. I have snapped two chains so far. I just ordered a racing chain for a dirt bike. I do not know if the teeth will fit this chain. I have read that the stock chinese chains are cheap. Any ideas?

    My second issue is the rear brake on the schwinn occ sucks. I would like configure something custom. Any ideas?

    You guys are always helpful.
    Thanks in advance,

    Bill
     

  2. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    wow, i built my o.c.c. last year and i don't have chain issues or brake issues.
    what size chain came with your kit? the bigger 415 chain (motorcycle size) or smaller 410 chain (bmx size bicycle chain) ?
    mine has the bigger 415 chain and i have never had any issues with it.
    I'm using a hidden chain tensioner that i made for it.
    My brakes work GREAT and they will lock up the rear wheel with no problem. (they are the stock brake pads on the stock brake caliper).

    If your chain is snapping, it may be way too tight. sometimes the hole in the rear sprockets are not exactly in the center, causing the sprocket to act like an eccentric. this woudl make the chain go "tight,loose, tight, loose"...etc as the sprocket spins.
    if you are adjusting the chain tightness when it's on the "loose" part of the rotation, it might be snapping when it gets to the "tight" part of the rotation.
    this woudl make the chain WAY too tight.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2011
  3. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    Chain.

    Hey billpb1222,
    As always, (Well, almost always,) Motorpsycho is right.(just funnin with ya Moto:jester:) If your chain is adjusted properly, Your sprocket is straight and lined up with the engine sprocket, and don't go tightloosetightloose, AND your engine is set FIRMLY in your frame, Then even a cheap chain should go at least a few hundred miles, with only chain lube and an adjust here and there, before you even THINK about replacing it. Grab your engine at the head, (wait for it to cool off,) Then grab your frame. Pulling the engine one direction and pushing the frame the other direction, in a back and forth motion, See if the engine moves AT ALL. If so, this is at least part of your problem. The engine CAN'T move at all or it will also throw the chain out.
    Next, Check the rear sprocket. Take both chains off, set up the bike so the rear wheel spins free. Using a wide marker, spin the wheel and place the marker against the frame near the edge of the sprocket moving it closer untill it barely touches. a wobble will show as marks on only one side of the sprocket, Telling you where you need to go with it.
    You can check for tightloosetightloose in almost the same way except you place the marker, or whatever you want to use, REAL NEAR the end of the sprocket teeth. Keep it laying solid on the frame and bring it closer and closer untill it barely touches the teeth. That mark is harder to see, but it will be on only SOME of the teeth if it has a wobble. Taking that wobble out is another post. I'm old and a real slow typer and about worn out from just this, (don't go there Moto,) So let me know what you find out.
    Thanks
    Big Red.
     
  4. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    Yeah Motorpsycho, I've also built a few of the OCC's with no problem at all.
    Of course you know you can't really use the center hole of the sprocket as a guide for centering it. Again, chinese "Quality Control" at it's best. I always go by what the sprocket itself is doing and center it using the method I described to billpb1222. Of course I built a wheel stand to do it with but the basic method is the same. It's not real easy but it works. If there's a better way I should like to hear about it.
    Thanks,:bowdown:
    Big Red.
     
  5. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    Bill, some of the OCC's came with rear caliper type brakes and some with coasters. I had the caliper posts welded to one of my OCC builds so I could install the better brakes. Just make REAL SURE you have the posts in EXACTLY the right place before welding. Machine shops always charge a fortune. Check with your local muffler shop to see if they will do it. My muffler guy would charge me 5 or 10 bucks for a job like that. And he digs watching one of my choppers roll in.
    Big Red.
     
  6. billpb1222

    billpb1222 New Member

    I just ordered a Topeka chain tool. Is it true that with this tool I do not need master connector links?

    Thanks,
    Bill
     
  7. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    I am assuming that this is a chain breaker tool?
    if so, you can put the chain back together with the tool once you remove the links you need to remove.
    it will be self explanitory on how to put the chain back together once you get it apart.
    BUT remember, you will need one inner (female) link on one end and one outer (male) link on the other end to connect the chain together. It can get confusing sometimes when you are trying to measure how much chain to remove. Trying to remember that you need one kind of link at one end, and a differnt kind of link at the other end.
    sometimes when you re-connect 2 links this way, the joint becomes really stiff, and the links won't want to move.
    your best bet is to take the chain apart with the tool, measure how many links that you need to remove, and then re-connect the chain with a master link. The master link will not make the joint stiff and if you ever need to take the chain off again, it's A LOT easier to take a master link out, than to use the tool and take the chain apart again.
    When you use a master link it has male ends, so you will have to have a female end at each end of the chain....makes it much easier.
     
  8. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    Chain

    And remember to install the open end of the master link clip away from the rotation direction of the chain. This way, if something "ticks" or hits it, It won't get knocked off.
    Big Red.
     
  9. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    Practice on your dead chain. Try connecting links. Push one pin all the way out so you know how the tension feels when it is just about to pop out. You want to only drive the pin out enough to reassemble the chain, so it helps to know the feeling and position. The center notch for a chain is for applying light pressure to loosen the stiff joint, that is all. If it breaks off, you can just grab the chain with both hands and press a thumb on the new joined link, and wiggle it forcefully to loosen (flex the chain sideways).
     
  10. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

Loading...