Cheap reed valve setup

Discussion in 'Performance Mods' started by V8bacon, Oct 3, 2016.

  1. V8bacon

    V8bacon New Member

    Hello I'm new to the forum and have been working on these engines for a couple years now . I have been working on a reed vavle setup for a ported engine with crankcase packing . I'm just playing around with some metal right now to see were this goes . Has anyone built a homemade reed vavle setup before ?
     

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  2. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    both I and lazylightning have.
    mine was small and fit inside the intake port. it was homemade.
    his was made for a moped and he fabricated the adaption to his engine. It turned out really good and he gets good power from it, his 21mm Dellorto carb, and torque pipe. He also increased the size of his transfer ports and it has a Jaguar CDI.
     
  3. V8bacon

    V8bacon New Member

    Does a boost port help with a reed vavle setup .
     
  4. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    definitely
     
  5. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

    SDC10221.JPG SDC10222.JPG SDC10223.JPG SDC10230.JPG SDC10235.JPG SDC10237.JPG SDC10533.JPG SDC10534.JPG SDC10921.JPG SDC10922.JPG Hi!

    Here's the setup I made. I used some pieces of 3mm thick cheap steel I cut from some square tubing profile used in construction. I used the semi-automatic wire feed welding machine, it makes welding as easy as pie. The one thing that needs to be taken into consideration in advance is the deformation of the construction due to welding. The mating surface with the valve insert and the mating surface of the intake tube hatch. This means the best thing to do is to make box walls to line up well within the bolt hole pattern so that you can use full removable bolts instead of welding studs into the construction. Bolts could hold the mating plate flt and tightly to a thick steel plate so that it doesn't deform while welding. Then the little areas close to the bolt heads could be welded with the bolts removed for minimum risk. Also, you could just try to weld it with the bolts in and just let them get welded in a bit. But no reason to weld all the way around the bolt head and risk more deformation. The steel deforms significantly as it cools. I had this problem and I had to repair the flatness of the mating surface by using jbweld. No picnic at all. Here's some pics from different stages.
     
    FurryOnTheInside likes this.
  6. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

    SDC10535.JPG SDC10918.JPG SDC10919.JPG SDC10920.JPG SDC10529.JPG SDC10532.JPG SDC10877.JPG SDC10878.JPG SDC10887.JPG SDC10888.JPG I cut the divider out of the middle of the valve and used single large pieces of carbon sheet for the reeds. I left part of the dividers in since it was not going to increase flow by removing all of them and the remainder helps stabilize the reeds. The distance from the reed valve nose to the little hex-key-tool-bolt-heads inside of the reed is also important. Dont use normal bolts, it will be a hassle to tighten them and you probably wont be able to tighten it enough. If the reed doesn't fit inside, then you cant bolt it down. Mine was close, so I used a second gasket to space it away a bit. I used locktite when bolting the reed box to the cylinder because you cant tighten them from the outside, and when its all together you dont want them coming loose. There was alot of free space inside the reed box around the reed valve due to design flaw, so I cut and shaped chunks of industrial teflon that is easily bought here. The carbon sheet material from Malossi has a slight curve to it. It is concave to the printed side. So you want to use the printed side in towards the valve when placing the reeds to the valve. I don't know about other brands of carbon reed sheet.
     
  7. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

  8. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

    SDC10254.JPG The greatest part of the job was modifying the cylinder. I use a shorter conrod from a Yamaha Jog, so I have to remove 5mm from the bottom of the cylinder using a special rig in a lathe. Before doing that I welded some aluminum material to the outside area of the transfer channel onto the last fin so that when I lathed it down there would be a nice flat mating surface that is wider than stock. This is because I widened the transfer channels to such a degree, that the walls of the transfer channels to the fins was about two millimeters thick. Note! The stock mating surface area is wider than the rest of the transfer walls(to the fin side) and you should be careful not to widen it so much as to go through the wall to the fins and get yourself a hole that will be difficult to repair with jbweld and always be in the back of your mind as a potential air leak. SDC10248.JPG SDC10249.JPG SDC10250.JPG SDC10251.JPG SDC10252.JPG SDC10253.JPG SDC10254.JPG SDC10255.JPG SDC10256.JPG SDC10257.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2016
  9. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

  10. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

    Here you can see how I made the booster port. It was wrong and I corrected it. I took out the dividing material in the middle and added jbweld to the sides because it shouldn't be as wide as the intake. In the las photo, you can see how I welded aluminum material to the transfer channel areas on the carters to make a wider mating surface for different builds in the future.

    SDC10273.JPG SDC10275.JPG SDC10276.JPG SDC10277.JPG SDC10278.JPG SDC10279.JPG SDC10280.JPG SDC10281.JPG SDC10282.JPG TvKd-DyY0fI.jpg
     
  11. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

    I made my exhaust port 29 mm wide, not sure I remember the timings. My transfers were 112 with a stock piston, but after putting ramps on it, the timing wheel showed a transfer timing of 122, which isn't exactly true with ramped piston edges. I had to modify the squish band head chamber because it didn't line up with the cylinder. My piston skirt had to be modified to fit the contour of the flywheel because the conrod is 5mm shorter than stock. I widened the inside back part of the transfer channels so far back towards the stud hole lines that the flow through the transfers was "corrected" in an inovative new way without restriction flow volume and providing a proper forward directing angle. SDC10292.JPG SDC10299.JPG SDC10300.JPG SDC10304.JPG SDC10307.JPG SDC10316.JPG Later I removed the small toungue of material and opened this area up for more flow volume.
     
  12. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

  13. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

    I tried to correct the end of the rings length. I added some jbweld to the ends after filing them just enough to get clean rough metal for a strong hold. I used an industrial standards cross reference sheet to find the optimum gap width for the rings and used a feeler gauge with the piston installed into the cylinder upside down and bottom end up so I had access to the side of the piston rings while they were installed. SDC10329.JPG SDC10334.JPG SDC10341.JPG SDC10342.JPG
     
  14. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

    I did a balance change in the fly wheel two years ago when Installed the Yamaha conrod. Also, I stuffed the cranks with aluminum sheet cut to fit and jbweld around the center bearing journal structure in the case. Not that I needed a high CCR, I just wanted to make up for all the parasite empty space that can occur when widening channels and installing a reed setup. Also, I do not recommend using stock piston wrist pins, pin clips and bearings. I took a pin and clips from a Takemori piston and bought a Malossi upper end bearing for the conrod/pin. Just to make sure I went overboard, I used special professional racing coatings that have to be sprayed on with an aerography brush and baked in an oven at 15oC or more for an hour or so. One coating is a dry lubricant that makes the parts super slippery and doesnt wear off, and there is a thermal coating that goes onto the top of the piston and inside of the head. This keeps the heat from penetrating into the piston and head and keeps it in the exhaust. There's another coating for the backside of the piston and conrod that causes oil to shed quickly and thus dissipate heat, but I don't have it yet.
    Also, I used jbweld to glue a steel plate to the carter on the area around the chain drive gear because I had a chain eat a hole through the aluminum and break the seal of the crankcase which caused a major air leak. download (4).jpg download (6).jpg download (9).jpg download (12).jpg download (14).jpg download (15).jpg download (16).jpg download (17).jpg 11229573_10205272403672907_635885498730986000_o.jpg 12031373_10205272403832911_485647196375160495_o.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2016
  15. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

    I got it all running recently. Sorry, no gopro here, just held the camera strap in my teeth.

    And rooster tails:
     
  16. lazylightning@mail.r

    lazylightning@mail.r Active Member

  17. V8bacon

    V8bacon New Member

    Hello and thanks for that info really good work . How are you getting to cut the transfer ports ? Are you using a right angle grinder. And where can I find some of that reed material.
     
  18. zippinaround

    zippinaround Active Member

    very nice ! i might try make my own reed valve adapter after seeing this thanks lazy!
     
  19. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    lazy you sure aren't lazy! that's a lot of work. I saw your video and can tell it's got some beefy power.
    I'll bet it feels like a 100cc.
     
  20. Arty

    Arty Active Member

    Wow! That is a ton of work. - I hope it goes like the clappers of hell for you when you're done.
     
    lazylightning@mail.r likes this.
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