Clutch clutch arm question

Discussion in 'Transmission / Drivetrain' started by johnsteve, Aug 1, 2016.

  1. johnsteve

    johnsteve Member

    Is there a best way to remove the pin camshaft from the clutch arm? I am having trouble disengaging the clutch and I am sure that the problem is that the clutch arm hits on the bicycle frame. I am sure if I take it back a few noches off the clutch arm, it will solve the problem. The clutch did work, but now it does not.
     

  2. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    Oh no not another clutch thread! ;)

    It did work but now it takes a really long pull to open/disengage? Sounds like you took the sprocket cover off and lost the ball bearing that is meant sit under the bucking bar.

    With the ball bearing NOT lost on the workshop floor it is actually more common to adjust the lever in the OPPOSITE direction (CCW) to make it a bit easier to pull.
     
  3. johnsteve

    johnsteve Member

    thougth about that, but the bucking bar sticks out about a quarter inch. I think its enough, but I will have to double check. The clutch arm still hits on the frame, and its bothersome.
     
  4. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    No, that's fine, 6mm (~1/4") is the size of the ball bearing. I don't know what else could suddenly change though.. Check the flower nut retaining screw is in place so the flower nut can't come out of adjustment.. That's all I can think of.
     
  5. johnsteve

    johnsteve Member

    The bearing looks to be in there so, i just have to take off the clutch arm from the pin cam and move it a few notches.

    Yea, I see alot of these threads latley. Sorry to put up another one. I still think its in the clutch arm and having it rub up on the frame.

    I will check the flower nut tommorow
     
  6. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    No problem. I like the puzzle in a way.
    I just don't see how it worked before and then stopped working if it has anything to do with the position of the lever on the cam, which hasn't changed.

    I would have moved mine (the opposite way) to make the cable pull more like 90° to the arm, in order to make it less of a heavy pull, but when I tried to I couldn't get the lever off the splined cam shaft.. I think the manufacturers hammered it on there.
     
  7. johnsteve

    johnsteve Member

    yea thats what I am trying to do, to remove the camshaft off the spline. It is becoming a major PITA. I am hoping someone here can shead some wisdom on it. I just have to think that its the problem, because it does rub on the frame. It did rub on the frame before, but it did work, not without some effort. Last time it was running, I did notice that is was becomming more difficult to use the clutch.
     
  8. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    Most stuck bike parts (pedals seized into crank arms) I put in the oven to unseize them. I suppose there would be no harm in trying that method, although it isn't seized by corrosion as far as I can tell. I haven't read anything about this (or the root) problem though as far as I can recall.
     
  9. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    properly adjusted, that arm should pointing just about straight backwards when released, if your isn't, you need adjustment rather than a rotated arm - if you do rotate the arm, you'll have much less cam action at the bottom of the arm where it pushes the bucking bar
     
  10. johnsteve

    johnsteve Member

    I just took off the other side today and the clutch appears to be working fine. Its not sticking. So the problems has to be the clutch arm hitting the frame. Just wish there was an easy way of taking the clutch arm from the pin camshaft.

    I also noticed that there was some wear on the pin camshaft and that also would be the reason for additional clutch disengagement.

    Ideas still welcome.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    The wear to the edge of the cam is actually another modification that some people like to do, lol.
    I guess this IS the reason why you need to pull the arm further in to open/disengage the clutch than you did before.
    It makes me wonder why it wore down and is this abnormal wear. How much use has the part had? Is the bucking bar ball bearing failing to isolate the bucking bar from the rotation of the rest of the clutch/drive shaft parts?

    You can bend the arm out, I suppose. You will be making the angle that the cable pulls from even more acute (heavy to operate) if you go through with this, though.. I would prefer to find a way to adjust it to disengage before the arm hits the frame.. but I am repeating myself..

    So how come your clutch arm hits the frame anyway? Just out of interest. Weird frame, or what? Maybe someone will have an idea to do with this. Can you show us photos of this?
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2016
  12. johnsteve

    johnsteve Member

    its a crappy wallmart special. I remember I had to bend it slighly in order to get it to work when I was building it last year. If I did not do this then it would hit the back of the seat post.

    The only way I can think to adjust it is to move it over a few spline notches on the pin camshaft and the clutch arm. Anyone have any ideas? I am all ears.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    Okay it doesn't show the engaged (lever released) position but it looks like you have a fairly good angle of cable pull (close to 90°) so it could maybe take the adjustment you are asking about. I can think of one alternative go changing the position on the splines (as you haven't been able to remove it anyway) and I did mention it above... Stick it in a vice and bend the arm out. Straighten out the elbow that the arm has.
    Oh or replace the whole sprocket cover and cam and lever unit with a new one of the type that has a straight arm. That way you get a new cam too. You could probably lose the spring off the cable though- the general consensus says that spring does nothing but make the clutch heavier to operate.
     
  14. zippinaround

    zippinaround Active Member

    drill another hole further down and chop a bit off where its hitting the frame , or else just straighten it?
     
    Randall likes this.
  15. gary55

    gary55 Active Member

    New clutch arm and cam shaft Ebay 9.99 free shipping from ontario ca. vendor is vmotorv. You can get it for almost half that price if you don't mind waiting for shipping from china.
     
  16. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    that arm is fairly cheap, get a new one and this time grease the bucking bar heavily and also put a huge gob of grease in the hole where the arm sits every month or so

    remember that clutch arm has to have some free play when properly adjusted so it doesn't touch the bucking bar when not in use

    these shouldn't wear like that in less than several thousand miles
     
  17. johnsteve

    johnsteve Member

    OK, so the problem has been fixed. I have come to find out that the clutch arm is actually longer than normal. Fortunatly, I have a spare china girl motor and that is how I found out that the clutch arm was longer than need be. So, all I did was sledge hammer on a normal hammer on the concrete and bent it at about a 75 degree angle. Its the only way it would work. That was not all though. The clutch indeed was sticking and just gave it some wacks for about a half an hour and a bunch of debree fell onto the chain gaurd. What else can I say. Crappy motor, on a crappy bike, with a crappy clutch arm. The experence is not crappy, however. It was indeed a good learning experance. Now, I know enough to get an american PK80 motor on a decent frame, like a gt2a and build it myself. I am actually in the process of doing this at the moment. Best I can say now is I hope to blow up these motors ASAP so I can get a decent motor. In the mean time I have an extra motor for spare parts. Come winter time though, I plan on breaking the motor down and fiddle with it, just cause I can.

    Thanks for all the comments on this thread and I hope I was not too much of a PITA, with another clutch tread.
     
    FurryOnTheInside likes this.
  18. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    "american PK80 motor" now that you're happy learning, wait'll you learn there ain't no such thing
     
    gary55 likes this.
  19. gary55

    gary55 Active Member

    Don't think I couldn'ta said it better myself. These thing are these things.
     
    Randall likes this.
  20. Nanonevol

    Nanonevol Member

    You beat up your motor with a hammer and now say it's a crappy motor? Good luck!
     
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