custom mufflers?

Discussion in '2-Stroke Engines' started by rkbonds, Sep 24, 2009.

  1. rkbonds

    rkbonds Member

    Has anyone built a custom exhaust for their bike? I'm trying to figure out a way to build a true dual exhaust system :thinking: (one on each side of the bike). Anyone have any ideas or just show the custom exhaust you already have! :cool:
     

  2. Foximus

    Foximus Member

    2 strokes dont work with dual exhaust.
     
  3. sphynx.0029

    sphynx.0029 Member

    if you are still interested you can braze one up with 3/4" copper piping like i had to. have pix on profile of a chopper i made that req "special attention" to the exhaust
     
  4. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

    You can run a false pipe for looks, but for 2 pipes to work on a 2 stroke, you need 2 cylinders.
     
  5. rkbonds

    rkbonds Member

    I don't see why it wouldn't work. All you need to do is build a Y pipe off the main and run 1 on each side. All you are doing is sharing the exhaust work put a muffler on each pipe I wouldn't think it would cause any problems. When I said true I just meant exhaust coming out both sides. Sorry about writing it confusingly.
     
  6. Foximus

    Foximus Member

    unless you know what your doing you will crash your resonant frequencies together killing their inertia.... or overaccelerating it.
     
  7. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

    A 2 stroke needs a properly tuned exhaust to run correctly. The stock exhaust barely fills the need. All it really does is give the engine some form of back pressure to save the cyclic pressure wave timing of the engine from leaning out too much and overheating the piston. And it directs the exhaust and noise away from the operator.
    A twin or forked pipe will only make a 2 stroke run worse. A good exhaust creates timed pressure waves that push the intake charge back into the cylinder. Without it up to 50% of the fresh intake charge can go out the exhaust before the piston closes the exhaust port.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2009
  8. Foximus

    Foximus Member

    Actually if you have a properly measured length an open tube will work as an expansion chamber as there is no rarefraction at the end. At the open end of a tube, the orientation changes from a positive pressure wave to a negative pressure wave. The major downside is it will have an extremely narrow powerband.
     
  9. rkbonds

    rkbonds Member

    Ok here is the thing that I don't like. The exhaust exits directly in front of the rear tire and after riding for a while the rear tire slides when stopping (still breaking it in so I know it has a little more oil than would have later on but still). I'm wanting to direct the exhaust away from the rear tire but, if I bend the pipe any more it will hit the pedals. Any suggestions? I have a thought or two but would like to hear some different input please.
     
  10. MikeJ

    MikeJ Member

    One reader placed a 90 degree copper water pipe elbow at the end of his muffler and turned it hard left or hard right. That shot the exhaust to the side. He drilled a 1/16 inch hole through all four walls and held it in place with a cotter pin. Use a 45 degree bend if you want to direct the exhaust down and to the side. No soldering, welding, brazing, or precision machining required. Remove the copper piece when you no longer want it.
     
  11. sphynx.0029

    sphynx.0029 Member

    i noticed that too and i made a spout to redirect that cloud of slicks*** way from the wheel. if you add a 3/8(maybe a 1/4) copper angle (45 or 22.5 not sure what i got anymore but will send a pic in a nxt post for ya, just weld/braze teh copper bend on the end and paint it. .
     

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    Last edited: Oct 2, 2009
  12. sphynx.0029

    sphynx.0029 Member

    but the cotter pin idea is great too, no welding or braixing i shoulda thaught of that... dummie mee
     
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