DIY LED Timiing Light

Discussion in 'Electrical' started by jaguar, Mar 21, 2014.

  1. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    Here is my design for a DIY timing light after wasting hundreds of dollars buying different ones, none of which worked. I know the wire around the spark plug wire is without return connection to the circuit but it works by picking up electrostatic energy which uses air as return loop. This only works when it is dark as the light is not strong. But it works great for the small cost.
    LEDtiming.gif
    LED Timing Light Parts List
    source: www.mouser.com

    4 white light LEDs 638-33415X2C11SUA $.59 each
    2 1N4001 diode 1N4001 $.13 each
    1 5.1v zener diode 610-1N751A $.34
    1 2N7000 FET 512-2N7000 $.42
    1 10 ohm resistor 660-MF1/2LCT52R100J $.13
    1 1.8K resistor 291-1.8K-RC $.10
    1 100K resistor 291-100K-RC $.10
    1 .01uf capacitor 581-SR155C103KAATR1 $.19
    1 12 volt regulated supply 418-TRG1512-12-V $15.87
    1 2.5/5.5mm jack 163-4305-E $2.98
    Total before shipping = $22.75
     
    birdmannn101 and james65 like this.

  2. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    the correct Mouser part number for the diode is 512-1N4001
     
  3. OCCStingray

    OCCStingray Member

    All good and well to have a timing light but please tell me where you point it to get a reading?
     
  4. velzie

    velzie Member

  5. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    point at the rotating magnet. but first find top dead center (where piston is exactly at the top of its stroke) and mark both the magnet and the steel plate of the stator coil so that at TDC the marks are adjacent. From the TDC mark on the plate make more marks to the left of it every 2mm which equates to 6.4 degrees each mark.
    See the light in action at the second video on JNMotors Jaguar CDI page: http://www.jnmotorsbikes.com/Jaguar_CDI_p/jnm1195.htm
     
  6. OCCStingray

    OCCStingray Member

    OK thank you guys. Wouldn't a normal timing light work?
     
  7. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    I thought so myself but after buying 3 different ones, all not usable for 2 stroke timing, all I can assume is that most of them are made for 4 stroke engines. We live in a 4 stroke world, sigh
     
  8. OCCStingray

    OCCStingray Member

    I fail to see the difference, my dial back timing light has both 2 stroke and 4 stroke on the same dial, zero is still zero but when you wind it 2 stroke degrees gives a different reading due to the cycle, timing light it self still works off the spark lead exactly the same.
     
  9. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    Up to what RPM will it go? How much did it cost? I am offering a DIY alternative to expensive cheaply made timing lights.
    I'm not lying, I bought 3 different ones and the best one worked for 5 minutes. All cheap Chinese junk.
    If you got one that actually works, then good for you. Tell others where to buy it.
    But still the purpose of this thread is to let others have a cheap way to get it done. It is not for mechanics who do timing regularly though because of the weakness of the light.
    Probably the only people on this forum who might make one is those who like tinkering with electronics and want to actually see their engines timing change with RPM. With these electronic ignitions it isn't like the old days where you used a timing light regularly because your car used points which wore down and had to be adjusted regularly and then finally replaced.
    A timing light now is not a necessity, only a curiosity.
     
  10. OCCStingray

    OCCStingray Member

    $80 second hand,had it in my kit already (to tune cars) works at any RPM, you simply turn the dial at the desired RPM you require till TDC lines up then read the degree off the dial. No need to mark inaccurate increments.
     
  11. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    "till TDC lines up"? that sounds like it is only for use on cars with easily adjustable distributors, not anything like most 2 strokes where you have to take it apart to make a slight change in timing by rotating the plate a bit.
    I'll bet my lunch money that you haven't tried to use it on your bicycle engine yet, otherwise you wouldn't be talking like it is fine and dandy for 2 strokes.
     
  12. OCCStingray

    OCCStingray Member

    The dial you turn is on the light, you don't touch anything on the engine. I will let you know how it goes on the bike when I get around to checking the timing on it. Sorry, never checked timing on a bike before. I am assuming it is as easy as removing the cover, marking TDC and running the engine up?
     
  13. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    you will need an external voltage source, 12 volts up to 14, again, like a car.
    What brand and model light do you have?
     
  14. OCCStingray

    OCCStingray Member

    I have two spare car batteries, 3 cars and one 12V SLA, not going to be too hard to park the bike next to one.
     
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