Ever wonder why things are cheaper from China

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Fabian, Jan 20, 2013.

  1. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member


  2. Dankoozy

    Dankoozy Member

  3. Anton

    Anton Administrator Staff Member

  4. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    Lucky if that kid is 8 years old. Can you imagine all of the laws and regulations you'd be breaking if doing the same thing in America or Australia. The department of occupational health and safety would have you in jail so fast your eyes would spin, and that's if the department of child protection didn't get to you first.
     
  5. roughrider

    roughrider Member

    OK, I'm gonna play the devil's advocate here and say: One, I thought that was one heck of an impressive display of how competent a young child can be. Second, we were probably seeing a bit of theater. Third, I know I'd be very proud of any son of mine that could do that. Fourth, he hardly looked abused. Fifth, maybe we need to re-think child labor laws. Sixth, the link between unemployment (and illiteracy) with crime is notorious. Seventh, maybe the Chinese have some lessons to teach us.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2013
  6. Dankoozy

    Dankoozy Member

    I don't think you could find a boy that age who wouldn't want that job. I'm no fan of China but feck it if you tried it here all the parents would be up in arms, calling Joe Duffy, trying to get the people who allowed it to happen to hang for their terrible crime. Completely different attitude, the "hands off thats dangerous" culture is worst in UK and Ireland and probably the USA as well. When I was in thailand I saw loads of kids, usually 4 or 5 of them at a time on a scooter but they were careful, i could keep up with them on a regular bicycle. It kind of makes me sad how far things have gone over here and how kids are just not allowed to experiment at all and are completely molly coddled.
     
  7. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Member

    I am 73 and when going to school, it would let out in the spring for cotton chopping and laying the crops by until July. Then would attend school for two months until 1st of September, when school would be let out to pick cotton until end of October.

    This was just a fact and way of life for kids to help the families with farm work. We were not abused and it instilled in us a work ethic which is sadly lacking in so many young people today.
     
  8. roughrider

    roughrider Member

    I too was a working kid, spending my summers with my curmudgeonly grandfather who was a child of the depression. One time, while driving around the far north of California looking for good trout fishing, he showed me a wooden bridge he had helped build while working on one of Roosevelt's work crews. Proudly, he showed me a scarf joint he himself had made 45 years before using only hand tools, an adze, in fact! It was still so tight you could not slip a credit card in the crack.

    I was deeply impressed. Though I grew up to be an artistic, academic sort, I like to think that I never lost sight of the fact that it was his (and previous generations) that had built the wealth that made it possible for guys like me to live. I complained a lot about how hard I was worked as a kid, but looking back, shoot, it wasn't hard. I had plenty of food, sturdy clothes, and enough spending money to buy french fries and sodas with my friends. Better than money, I learned things that have enriched my life ever since.

    (I tried picking cotton once. We grow it around Fresno, to the south. I lasted less than a day. My hands were ripped to shreds, and I collapsed from exhaustion trying to keep up with the rest of the crew. Picking cotton is tough!)
     
  9. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    :iagree:
     
  10. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    I don't think you could find a boy that age who wouldn't want that job. I'm no fan of China but feck it if you tried it here all the parents would be up in arms, calling Joe Duffy, trying to get the people who allowed it to happen to hang for their terrible crime. Completely different attitude, the "hands off thats dangerous" culture is worst in UK and Ireland and probably the USA as well. When I was in thailand I saw loads of kids, usually 4 or 5 of them at a time on a scooter but they were careful, i could keep up with them on a regular bicycle. It kind of makes me sad how far things have gone over here and how kids are just not allowed to experiment at all and are completely molly coddled.[/QUOTE]


    :iagree:


    I was in Thailand last year and couldn't believe how well the road transport system worked with a "virtually" hands off approach to traffic laws and regulations. My god, there were 5 people on a scooter "and" they had the thing loaded up with supplies from the local market.
    What was even more surprising is that the 'Mum' was the only person wearing a helmet. In all my time over there, i never saw even a single motor vehicle accident, yet our Western governments keep telling us that they need to keep us safe with diabolically encroaching laws and regulations on our life.

    It's sad to see kids these days just sitting and wasting their youth sitting infront of games consoles. When i was young, we spent most of our life falling out of trees then running back to Mum with all sorts of scrapes and bruises, only to hear her say "i don't see any blood, 'stop crying; go back out and play"
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2013
  11. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    :iagree:
     
  12. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    :iagree:
     
  13. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Member

    For cotton chopping, kids 12 years of age and older who could who keep up with adults received the same pay, fifty cents an hour. Four siblings and I would get up at 5-am, quickly eat a prepared breakfast, crew truck would pick us up at 5:30, be in the field by 6, chop cotton until noon whistle from soybean mill, (it could be heard for many miles) Crew truck would take us to nearest store for bottle of pop, baloney sandwich and a candy bar or cup cake, etc. (all for 25 cents) then back in the field by 1-pm, and chop until 5.

    Cotton picking was piece work and average pay was $3.00 a hundred weight, in the field by daybreak, (dew wet cotton weighed more) an hour for lunch, then pick until dark, any 12 year old kid who could not pick 200 pounds and earn $6.00 a day were not worth their salt.
     
  14. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    At the end of the day, it's the massive over regulation of Western society and the deceitful action of big business that requires so much over regulation.

    Back in the old days it was simple. As soon as you could talk, you learned the three R's and you learnt how to work around the house at home. That notion continued on with training through your first employer, which then gave long term job security and a skilled and loyal workforce for the employer with pay rates that reflected living conditions.

    When there was a social obligation for employee and employer to mutually look after their interests, massive over regulation wasn't needed.

    The Chinese kid in the video has a job and drives a piece of machinery that makes me envious.
    I spent $3,000 getting my heavy earth moving certificates, yet no one would give me a job because their insurance wouldn't cover an inexperienced operator and those that didn't worry about insurance wouldn't give me a job because i didn't have the required 10 years experience on heavy machinery. Even when i offered to work for 'free', i still couldn't get a job on heavy machinery because of all of the occupational health and safety issues and legal ramifications if i even so much as scratched a tree branch with the machinery.

    It's not hard to see why it's easy to do business in China, compared to Western countries and we haven't even got into the mountain of legal issues that serve as a disincentive for potential employers and sometimes even employees.
     
  15. Dankoozy

    Dankoozy Member

    Yer making me feel like a young snapper whipper with talk of cotton pickin for 50c an hour. In my day the cotton plant hadn't evolved into being yet (or the Lord was saving it for later)! Feh!

    It is the same over here, small businesses have a fierce uphill battle because of insurance, liability, licenses and certs while the big foreign boys have no problem coming to Ireland and setting up shop. I could develop an electronic product over here and I would have to pay some lab through the nose to do testing on it for CE certification. In China CE certification only costs a drop of ink. Even if I wanted to set up a simple market stall or do grounds maintenance people here would be concerned about insurance. Its amazing how the insurance industry got so much power and how they sold it so well to the people. It's just insanely hard to get sh*t done here because of red tape
     
  16. Happy Valley

    Happy Valley Active Member

    Here's a chestnut, something from an HT factory. Looks like the first kid on the assembly line is about 12, note the tools being used consist mostly a big mallet and pliers and the open belts and unventilated "test area" :D

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 15, 2015
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