First project- pics 1909 Faux motorcyle

Discussion in 'Antique Motorized Bicycles' started by Hoodoo, Jan 4, 2010.

  1. Hoodoo

    Hoodoo Member

    Here is my current project (the Indian references in the pics are tongue in cheek) (actually I was a producer and assistant my cousin did the welding and cutting but I think I have him hooked now). Very much a learning experience. The bike is smaller than I would have liked (although a small rider might help perspective), the second will be larger and more radical although our frame experiment was like a potato chip, next time will replace the center post and rake it backwards to make a U type frame, as it was just put the seat back and down. Anyone know the wheel height on these older bikes (including tires?). A twenty niner might be better for more authenticity.
    The fenders are just draped on for the pic, the final paint will be overall red (although those black fenders and black tank on a red frame is appealing.
    The tank is a 20 buck commercial purchase, it is just laying for now in the space as is, had to lop off the rear top and bottom to get it to fit, will be modded to at least cosmetically fill in the fuel tank area. White tires will be added. The kickstand will be replaced with a modern rear axle stand that I will modify to look more vintage. The seat is a Bell I got at walmart, not ideal but better than the black seat that was provided with the industrial bike. Think I will use a regular old walmart bike for the next one as it is going to be cut up big time anyway with a lenghtened and perhaps heightened frame.
    Any suggestions, questions are appreciated. It looks like these are going to be like potato chips, can't built just one.

    alsumrall2001@yahoo.com
     

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  2. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

    That's looking awesome!
     
  3. Hoodoo

    Hoodoo Member

    Thanks. After we got it together, we thought about other things we could have done with it, but the construction as is was necessary to get our confidence up. We are not the type to make plans and study in infinite detail (I am envious of folks who can do that), it was a matter of just bending pipe and cutting it to fit and checking clearances. The type of engine set up limits the frame to some extent, however I am thinking of maybe putting a loop at the bottom and setting up a dummy crankcase on the next project. Not sure if it is really worth doing that...right now the goal is to get the tank built and then get her painted and use her as a "technology demonstrator" to our museum volunteers in order to encourage more projects. The interesting thing about this project is that so far although it has used up about 50 man-hours in experimentin' and fittin', in terms of actual quality time it has only taken up about 20 hours. Next time we will have all the materials we need set up and ready to go and will have a much clearer plan than my merely ballpark ideas for this first go around.
     
  4. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

    That's how things get developed.
    1st- prototype.
    2nd- polishing out the details.
    3rd- pre-production run and extensive torture testing.
    4th- re-engineer what fails.
    5th- more torture testing. (repeat 4 and 5 as necessary)
    6th- enjoying a well made production machine.
    7th- mass production and profit (if you really want to take it that far).
     
  5. Hoodoo

    Hoodoo Member

    project progress

    Still working on it. Have the over the counter tank cut down, now I can build over it to make it look more vintage. Very much regret not lengthening the frame about four inches. Nonetheless it compares well to a 1921 Triumph H which pretty much looks like a 1915 Model H, single cylinder and all. Threw the chain on the first test run, ran cool for 20 feet and all heck broke lose messed up the chain, had to repair it, have now shortened the chain and checked alignment so will try her again. Have kind of lost the Indian look, will paint it gloss black (like my black cat which has become chief inspector--she will be the "model" when we are done and taking serious pics) with gold trim to make it more generic. Have also purchased a much bigger seat for lots of comfort as you can see, the new springer forks are nearly identical to the triumph's, just not as robust. Also will be installing 32" handlebars along with the white tires before I am thru but right now need to get it running right.
     

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  6. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

    She's coming along quite nicely!
    When you're all done, it'll be the cat's meow! :D

    I like to watch a good bike develop into an awesome bike.
    Thankyou for the update.
     
  7. Whizzerd

    Whizzerd Member

    First project- pics 1909 Faux motorcycle

    Hi Hoodoo. Been following your build since the thread describing it as a museum repro display. Very cool IMO.Looking forward to see it done. I've been considering the Husky 105 for a 4 cycle build and also looking at the larger Worksmans. Your thoughts please sir on the quality of materials and workmanship of your donor bike. Thank you!
     
  8. Hoodoo

    Hoodoo Member

    1909 Project Complete and Running

    This is my amatuerish 1909 homage motored bike being ridden by a friend. It was a big hit at our Spring air fairat least 8 people rode it, several times each.
    The throttle is sticking but I think I can fix it next workday. The airfield dog and one of our aircraft, a Curtiss Jenny which actually flies with an original OX-5 engine. I have plans for a much more ambitious bike that I am sure will cost less than this one did because I made every mistake in the book, especially as I was in a hurry. It is surprizingly powerful, pulled my 220 frame around as fast as I ever want it to go. Hopefully this week will bring several of the pics at the airfare with folks in period clothes riding it. It fit in great with our Model T's and also with our 1921 Triumph that was also running. Throw in the grass airstrip and old planes and it is an awesome experience.
    After riding it, the first "two wheeler" I have ridden in nearly 40 years, I am now caught by the bug.
     

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  9. Hoodoo

    Hoodoo Member

    1909 Faux ridden at events two pics

    Here it is being ridden at our air fair by a "German WWI pilot".

    Here is another about to be ridden by a 1916 US Soldier in the June 2010 Luling Texas Watermelon parade. Had a blast. The float behind me was very slow giving me several hundred feet to ride around, do figure eights, salute all the kids and old timers (just like those shrinders do). The bike really rode well A group of us could have had a blast (except for the heat). The pic is entitled "the little kid that tagged along" as it drove behind our museums model T and when the parade slowed down at times I would ride circles around the T with it blaring it's OOGAH horn at me....little kid pestering the adult.

    Dressing in period clothing really makes these bikes stand out as well as being used in conjunction with old vehicles!

    The only catch at parades is that when you are in it, it's darn nigh impossible to take pics. Hopefully some will turn up on the net soon.

    Al
     

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  10. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

    Very cool! Thank you for sharing.
     
  11. Hoodoo

    Hoodoo Member

    I never responded, to your donor bike question

    I got the Husky but have been informed the Worksman's rear section is more
    close to the 1909ish frame design. Considering one isn't using a whole lot of the frame, it could be argued they aren't worth it, I mean the whole front section has to be cut away, I didn't cut away my top bar but will with the next project. However, the heavy duty wheels are appreciated...I am no lightweight at 220.

    So, I am trying to find a USED worksman for my next project (just missed out on a 100 used one locally), although I think just about any frame will probably do. Duece custom bicycles http://www.deucemotorbicycles.com/
    uses worksman's as his bases and they look great but he is also cutting away the whole front section in order to lengthen the bike six inches. I'm darn partial to his blue Indian and am considering buying one, I mean it has a darn lot of nice work in it and comes ready for engine installation.
     
  12. scooterpimp

    scooterpimp Banned

    That build really takes the china look away from the engine. Awsome!!!
     
  13. findingmrsmith

    findingmrsmith New Member

    Try flipping around the neck and reversing the bars. Also if you want a cleaner look weld a pipe 90* from the original seat pipe and turn the clamp under the seat 90* to slip it on. gives it a better board track look. I've got pictures if you like.
     
  14. Hoodoo

    Hoodoo Member

    I wanted a more conventional look to the bike, more like a regular motorcycle. The board trackers to me are kind of strange in terms of a fun riding bike. I mean the current engines don't get them up to any sort of fun speed anyways. To me these bikes are cruisers more than racers.
     
  15. I cant bring myself to flip bars and hunch over a bike that has a top speed of 35 mph downhill , maybe some bikes with hi po engines are capable of higher speeds, might be fun to race others on a track but its still going to be slow racing .
    I built my bikes to be cruisers also.
     
  16. Hoodoo

    Hoodoo Member

    If you put me on anything that looks like a racer I am going to want to go fast. I might stick a more powerful engine on it just to see if I can make the worlds fastest bicycle and might find myself on the salt flats like Munro. Cannot have that. I think would be embarrassing to speed all hunched over at 35 MPH, then again, maybe it might do 36, then 37....uh-oh, somewhere along the line things are gonna hurt and I am not of the skateboarding mindset. A lot of folks have gotten caught up with "boardtracker" as a romantic kind of bike but as far as I know there aren't any board tracks around. The old cruiser motorcycles were what was running the dirt roads of America and those early blacktops.
     
  17. Hoodoo

    Hoodoo Member

    riding my kingsbury in parade photo

    Just ran across this pic, it was so small when sent to me I did not recognize it.
    I had plenty of room to ride in this parade in Luling Texas in June. Great fun, recommended even in areas where they aren't legal.
     

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  18. Hoodoo

    Hoodoo Member

    1909 Special at a local event with vintage duds

    Here is the 1909 bike at a local event. What do you think of the outfit...not everyone who rode back then was 18 and 125 lbs.
    At some risk I am posting this as my last post I tried with these two videos got it cast out of heritage lane by the monitors. I have had no response to my query yet as to why it was cast out into the general population, perhaps it was my subject line rather than the content, at least I hope so....so there are the videos again, perhaps these will pass monitor muster, if not I am totally perplexed, note the original motorcycle/bicycle manual klaxon style horn, just put it on, carbide lamp coming next:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeNaBfXc6y4
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fk-VKVUO10
     
  19. KilroyCD

    KilroyCD Active Member

    FYI - it was the subject line (amongst other things). Nothing was mentioned about the faux 1909 Special in the subject line or the text; just about making YouTube videos. That's why it was moved to the general discussion section.
     
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