good front fork for gas mountian bike?

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by jatgm1, May 9, 2016.

  1. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member


  2. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    Old used Marzocchi bomber .. preferably Z1 but they're all good.. just don't get anything "xc" or "super light" obviously.
    Coil spring and open oil bath damping is proper classic motocross tech and easiest to mess about with.
    I'm basically just telling you what I have, lol. All my suspension forks have been Marzocchi.
    I have a very nice black 2001 Z1 with quick release dropouts and it is going straight on my LTS 5 when it arrives!
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2016
  3. Hello Moto!

    Hello Moto! Active Member

    Is you're headset threadless or threaded? If it's threaded it's best to find a fork that has almost the exact same steerer tube length. If it's threadless, it is real easy to space out any extra steerer tube length with headset spacers. You can do that with threaded but it's not ideal.
     
  4. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member

    how do i figure out if its threaded or threadless?
     
  5. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    Pull the stem off.
    Or show us a photo? Have you only got the frame?
    All the Spesh Hardrocks I've seen have been nice MTBs, they're 29ers now I see... What year is yours from?
     
  6. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member

  7. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member

    is there a way i should remove this so i dont, idk, loose balls from the bearing or something? or can you tell from this? i just dont want any more headaches than the HT engine.
     
  8. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member

    it appears to just be three allen screws. two on the right side horizontally, and one decending vertically down the, umm stem i guess.
     
  9. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    Mmhm. It's an aheadset (threadless). Likely to be sealed bearings so you cant lose the balls. Even if unsealed they'd be caged.
    Remove top bolt first and measure with a ruler, pop it back on again until you get your new MTB fork. It goes on first when you fit the new fork, sets the tension and makes sure it's all securely in place before the pinch bolts do the real work. Always test carefully using front brake and rocking the bike, checking for any play before riding, otherwise it will damage the bearing very quickly.
    So what's wrong with the fork you have on there now?
     
  10. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member

  11. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member

    also, how would i fit v brakes on this?
     
  12. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    Just get a used mountain bike fork, like an old Marzocchi or even Rockshox.. 100mm or 110mm travel should be good. EBay etc..
    The "springer" in your original post is what people put on their cruiser type bikes.. No damping, and possibly using drum brakes. Not really appropriate in a mountain bike in my opinion.
     
  13. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member

    ah, i just assumed "big shocks, better with bumps"
     
  14. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    Noo, those are for vintage looking bikes that people like, look like the earliest motorcycles that derived from bicycles of the time. You don't need a brand new fork anyway. Used, early 2000s mountain bike forks often go for peanuts on eBay. Just check the length of your steerer tube and get something coil sprung and oil damped like Marzocchi bomber Z1 or similar in my opinion. Don't rush to buy anything for your bike, have a good look at the bikes shown on here and the options available.
     
  15. Hello Moto!

    Hello Moto! Active Member

    I agree with this.

    The top screw going down vertically will screw in to a star nut inside the fork steerer tube. With proper spacing this is what adjust your vertical play in the headtube or the tightness of your steering explaining it roughly. The two allen bolts located on the stem which are horizontal adjust your stem and handlebar alignment left to right. When you get a new fork it will need to be the same length steerer tube or you can cut it to size or space it out with headset spacers if it is longer than your current fork. If you space it you want the stem to sit with just a little space above the top of the steerer tube not completely flush so when you tighten down the top vertical allen bolt it will pull the fork upwards taking out any excess play in the headtube. All you need is a millimeter or two. When you take it all apart just kinda reverse engineer it and it will be a little easier to understand.

    Your headset is threadless so almost any length will work as long as it's not to short. Too long is ok but to short simply will not work. Since I doubt you want to replace your whole headset, you will need to purchase another star nut to insert into your forks steerer tube and also you will have to take the crown race off your old fork and put it on your new fork. The crown race is at the base of the steerer tube on your fork and is basically what your bearings sit against. I am going to post a link to a video on YouTube that will show you pretty much everything you need to know. Watch it and it will all make sense.

     
    FurryOnTheInside likes this.
  16. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member

    wow thats pretty simple. are crown nuts and star nuts universal? can i just get them preemptively and pop them on the new fork? taking the crown nut off seems like a pain. and it looks like a large washer, so whatre they, like 5$
     
  17. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    It depends on the headset bearing. Some are interchangeable and some aren't. What we do know is the one that is currently on your fork definitely fits your headset.
    When you get a new fork, if it is a used fork it may even have one on already. If not or if it doesn't look the same then it is easy to remove from your old fork by spraying on a little WD40, leave for a bit, then place the fork upside down on the floor and then with a large flat head screwdriver and plastic mallet you can knock it free. Just tap lightly in about four places and keep working your way around and around until it comes free. The only thing to avoid is hitting one side hard, that would possibly jam or bend it.
    New ones are likely only available as part of a brand new whole aheadset.
    A used fork will already have a star nut inside.
     
  18. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member

    can i get one that has threads even though mine is threadless? it seems like only the other way around could be a problem right?
     
  19. jatgm1

    jatgm1 Member

  20. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    Never tried and wouldn't, so I can't tell you. I doubt it would be a great idea. The stem is meant to grip the surface so you can steer.. Can it do that on a thread?
     
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