Good lord what have I done ;) Fito Modena GT Build

Discussion in 'Photos & Bicycle Builds' started by gurutogo, Aug 25, 2013.

  1. gurutogo

    gurutogo New Member

    Hey all my name is Matthew and I'm a motor-aholic. I think I screwed up big time today and decided in all my brilliance to build a motorized bike project. I'm not sure if I made a terrible decision or not but here is the bike I bought for my project. I'm a novice with mechanicals though I did use to work on bikes quite a bit in my mountain bike days and frankly I have a brown thumb when it comes to motors (just ask my non-running Vespa). So my project bike is the the Fito Modena GT Alloy 7 speed. I just liked the combination of features, front and rear disk brakes, build quality, custom fenders, forks, etc.. I would like to pair it with a black 2 stroke 66cc motor. I'm wondering what things I need to prepare for in doing this conversion. Is there a way I can spend a little more for the kit to dramatically increase reliability & useability? How does the shifting work with a motorized bike and how can I enable the engine to use the different gears? BTW I'm 6' 250# and will be using this bike in a somewhat hilly area. Any feedback you can provide or point me to is greatly appreciated. Also where do you recommend I pick up a black motor I know many of the places seem to be out of stock on the good stuff. Anyone know if this frame can be used to store fuel? Any modifications I'm going to need to make? Thanks again!!!

    Here are the bike specs http://www.ebay.com/itm/130967664214?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649



    $T2eC16F,!)sE9swm(sR6BR-vrfr1PQ~~60_57.jpg
     

  2. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    In order to use the bike's gears as the engine's drivetrain, you'll need what's known as a shift kit. As far as to answer your question of spending a little more to increase quality and reliability, you can get a 4 stroke kit for a little more money. It all really depends on what you really want to spend, what exactly you want out of your bike, and how long you want your engine and the components to last. I believe there is a vendor selling 4 stroke kits for $369 plus shipping, and the 4 stroke shift kit is $180 plus shipping right now. So for around $600 after shipping, you can have everything you need to have a reliable engine and bike. The 2 strokes are ok, but in my opinion the quality control is much better on the 4 strokes. The 2 strokes are a crap shoot, never know if you got a good one or a lemon until you run it for awhile. There are things you can do to improve your chances, but I'd rather not go through all that work just to make an engine reliable when it already should be.
     
  3. gurutogo

    gurutogo New Member

    Gears

    Ok so the main benefit of the gears is just better control over peddling hills unless you get a shift kit? I think with 7 it's simple enough to not over complicate or muck up the appearance but versatile enough to be usable. Are the 4 strokes better in cold weather? Will I need to have any custom parts above and beyond the normal kit to make this bike work with either kit? I honestly like the 2 strokes fine are there any that are bulletproof? Any other considerations you can think of? Thanks a bunch!

    BTW I love your tagline

    Also let me know where the best deal for a 4 stroke kit is. Thanks
     
  4. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    The clone motocross 2 stroke engines are pretty much bulletproof, but require a highly advanced mechanical skillset to build into a bicycle, and they are not cheap. The engine itself is around $500. The 4 stroke would do fine without a shift kit with the 7 speeds, you would be able to pedal up hills easily. 4 strokes do just about as fine in cold weather as 2 strokes. $369 is the best deal you'll find on a 4 stroke with a transmission thats any good. The only thing I can see about your bike that may need to be "customized" might be your gas tank mounts due to your odd shaped top tube.
     
  5. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

  6. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    I'd say your worst mistake was the bike itself.Should NEVER go with an AL frame on an MAB.The stresses an MAB adds is asking for disaster on an AL frame, when it goes you can only hope you're going slow.Do your own research here to confirm this.
     
  7. gurutogo

    gurutogo New Member

    I've have had lots of both types of bikes over the years and I'm talking 275# loaded with gear hauling for 10 of thousands of miles. Have clocked 75000+ miles on all types of frames aluminum, ceramic composite, chromoly, easton Chro, etc.. The only frames that have snapped have been cheap Chromoly. Especially at the joints. Aluminum is less forgiving though. I'm not going to be putting a tremendous amount of miles on this bike it's more for a hobby project. Thanks

    Ok one last question. Which dealer actually has stock of a good all black 66cc 2-stroke?
     
  8. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    I'm just going by what the reputable kit makers suggest, and the few AL failure stories I've read, one bad to ten good is enough for me.I must admit I love the looks of the bike, it's made for friction drive, though I think the tire may be a bit wide for a GEBE set-up.If it were about $50 to $70 cheaper I may even give it a try.Have fun and watch those welds.
     
  9. gurutogo

    gurutogo New Member

    It seems its hit or miss on whether AL is the issue or just poor workmanship and materials which can effect any product. I've had a few Huffy frames fail on me in my life (even when I was 12 and 130 lbs) and I see they are ridden by lots of Motorized bikers. I wouldn't trust my life to em. So go figure. I decided to contact Pirate Cycles for one of their black 66cc kits. I think it will be a good for the look I'm going for. Thanks for the advice we shall see how things go :) It should be interesting.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2013
  10. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    Thick tube steel frames are less prone to cracking due to engine viberation. The other advantages is the heavy steel frames are cheap and much easier to weld if they should crack. I personally prefer 4 strokes. They tend to have a much longer life than 2 strokes. Just clean the air filter every 10 hours and change the oil ever 50 hours. You can buy a tachometer/hour counter to keep up with a maintenance schedule. The shift kit is the best thing for large riders in hilly areas.
     
  11. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    Here is my opinion. A lot of those cheap Huffy builds are daily drivers, not just hobby projects (and I'm not defending cheap bikes or criticizing you for not trusting them). The Modena is obviously not a department store bike. Other than the possible questionability of the alloy frame, you've obviously chosen a well-built machine, with front and rear discs and 7 speeds. With a shift kit, that thing would climb walls, whether 2 stroke or 4 stroke. So why not build something you'll want to use? You've obviously chosen a bike that was designed for heavy use. Even if you don't add a shift kit, I'd still build something reasonably functional, not just a project to give yourself something to do. Let me give you some perspective. My first two bikes were department store bikes, chosen specifically for their low cost. They were 2 stroke bikes. The first bike did ok, even handled a rough winter and a 50 mile move, but I was working on it a lot and fixing or replacing little things constantly. The second bike I was ALWAYS fixing up, and replacing things constantly, and I worked on it more than I drove it. Between these two bikes, I probably spent 3 or 4 grand altogether easy, and the 2nd bike went through 3 engines in 2 years. My current bike has a 98cc 4 stroke (its not built from a kit, but thats a different discussion). I built this bike back in March, and have only missed work one time due to an improperly installed petcock (my fault) causing a fuel flow issue. And how much have I got in this bike? $850. The other two bikes started out cheaper than that, but ended up being more expensive in the long run. I'm not saying you should definitely choose 4 stroke over 2 stroke (though if reliability is what your after, having a 4 stroke greatly improves your chances), and I'm not telling you to spend a ton of money building something fully custom. I'm just saying that if you do your research and find out what works best and build with that knowledge, you'll be much prouder of yourself and you'll have something functional and reliable when you're done.
     
  12. bahramu

    bahramu Member

    I'm kinda in the same boat. I'm a noob and am about to start my first brand new build. I've been searching the site a bunch and have been riding and tweaking a second hand Mab. I feel I know enough to start a brand new build now and I've decided to do the cheap 66cc, mostly because I want to tinker with the motor and I feel building the HT motor is a rite of passage I must embark on before I enjoy the "luxury" of a quality 4-stroke.
    I decided to get the motor from:
    Enginesonlineshop.com
     
  13. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    To each their own, but I've said it before, you're better off finding a good used bike from the 80's bike heyday (better construction/metals) than buying most anything new (until you get into big $$$ range).As far as I can tell these frame mounts are for short rides, not long hauls, I'm into doing 80 milers on a regular basis which is no problem with a good bike and the GEBE.Staton is a close second, but way too heavy.98cc's on a bike sounds like someone needs a motorcycle.
     
  14. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    You can't build a motorcycle piece by piece with your own two hands unless you've got access to a very good shop and great fab skills, which I do not. You also can not buy even a decent used motorcycle for what I paid to build this bike. The engine was offered to me used for $50, so I took it. I did build this bike as much like a motorcycle as I was able to without having to fabricate anything. I do not want, nor will I ever own, a factory built bike. If I haven't built it, I wont ride it, pedal bikes being the obvious exception, which I dont do a whole lot of that either. You can pay me to drive your motorcycle.......to the scrap yard. Motor-assisted bicycles are a lot more versatile than factory built bikes. I can ride in the shoulder, motorcycles cant. I can start my bike in the dead of winter, and motorcycles cant unless they have a magneto or you keep them hooked up to a battery tender. Bottom line, keeping a factory built bike on the road year-round in harsh Penssylvania winters is way too much work just to have to pay registration and insurance and have a driver's license. I'm perfectly happy with my choice of bike and engine, and this is as close to a "real" motorcycle as I'll ever go. And btw, I geared my bike to redline at 32mph, so its not like I'm some kind of speed demon. I wanted to go 30 mph with my ht bikes and just never quite got there, now I cruise easily and reliably between 25 and 30, and that's all I ever wanted. To me, my bike is a motorcycle, and its way better than some factory built hunk of junk.
     
  15. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    I meant an 80's pedal bike to start with, and commenting that 98cc seems excessive.My GEBE with a 40cc Tanaka weighing in at roughly 15 extra LBS can match your speeds, and I can do an 80 miler on roughly 1/2 gal petrol.To each their own, just seems excessive.
     
  16. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    Like I said, I got the engine for $50. I also weigh 300 lbs. I dont know what kind of power those tanaka's make, but the ht engine barely ever made enough power to pull me around. My last bike struggled above 25 mph and wouldn't even climb moderate hills with a 66cc. I understand that in some people's opinion it might be excessive, but for someone my size I needed the extra power just to get around at a decent speed. And please lets not get into discussing my weight. I'm 6 ft 2 and built like a linebacker, what can I say?
     
  17. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    That's what MAB's are all about, mother of invention stuff.With that body-frame I'd be looking into a delta recumbent trike with a Staton gearbox and about 40 to 50 cc 2 stroke, but that's big $$.Have fun and check that headset often.
     
  18. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    I just have no interest in recumbents or trikes. I dont really care for mountain bike frames either. I like cruisers mostly. They just have a certain look that I prefer. And I'm quite happy with the 98cc engine. I've got it geared right in its powerband, and it performs perfectly for me. I doubt I'll ever use a 2 stroke engine again. Tuning is a pain in the rear. The stock carb on my engine isn't even tuneable, and the engine runs perfectly the way it is. I am picking up a spare engine pretty soon, and I might order a Honda gx carb for that engine as they are tuneable. But like I said, this engine is running great with the stock carb. I've done a few plug chops, plug is chocolate brown every time. The spare engine is only to replace this engine when it dies, but I figure it wont hurt to have a better carb. Only reason I haven't replaced the carb on this engine is cause I'd have to move the engine to get the carb off, and that's a real pita.
     
  19. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    Cheap engines give poor results, like hard to tune, low HP for their CC's.Cruisers are cool looking, but not for long hauls or rough tracks.MTB is the best overall (if you only have one bike).You're pushing the weigh limits of the bike, that's before putting an engine on it.Sun makes a couple bikes for the rotund person.My LWB recumbent "Lumpy" has a 300lb capacity, and is cooler than any cruiser you'll find.Form and function that's where I'm at,... when's the last time you took a trailer-less, fully loaded (camp gear/food/repair kit) hundred mile ride, with no breaks?
     
  20. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    I don't do long hauls. I built my bike for commuting, not touring. Work is only 3 miles from my house. I have a 13" wide Worksman seat to make it a little more comfortable, and its fine for short rides, and even somewhat longer ones. Comparing bicycles to motorcycles, in neither genre are cruisers designed for any type of touring. Though I did do a few tours on my first bike (100 mile round trips and a 50 mile drive one way with all the belongings I could carry). My bike is as comfortable as it can be for being a cruiser. As for weight limits, its an American made Schwinn cantilever frame with very thick-walled tubing. I doubt that I'm stressing the frame at all. And the best part? I got this frame for $25. I'm happy with my bike the way it is, and if I had to build it all over again, I'd build it exactly the same, down to every last detail.
     
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