Hi from Australia, SCHWINN STINGRAY 46cc CHUNG YANG?

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by CHOPPERBIKEINOZ, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. CHOPPERBIKEINOZ

    CHOPPERBIKEINOZ New Member

    Hi All
    Found this site whilst looking for info about fitting 2-stroke engines to bicycles, I have a CY 46cc engine on the way from the USA and wanted to know if there is a kit or mounting setup to fit this motor to the Schwinn Stingray or possibly even a more common mountain bike?

    I would like to mount the motor in the frame rather than behind the seat, And use a chain setup rather than a friction drive

    Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated
     

  2. professor

    professor Active Member

    Welcome to Motoredbikes!
     
  3. schulze 123

    schulze 123 Member

    Hi,
    Welcome to the group, I will research the motor to see if I can offer any assistance.

    Cheers BJ
     
  4. gothicguy64

    gothicguy64 Member

    hi
    cheapest bike is a dunlop from kmart ...100

    u need a 18 inch frame min

    front tube less than 50 mm
    seat tube of less than 40 mm
    coz of motor id go with a disk front wheel .

    im on a esperia eagle 20inch frame
    26 inch wheels
    rse hp2 with ceramic piston 48 cc
    sbp shiftkit hd2
    umm sbp exhaust , low pro filter ,hix6 plug ,metal throttle,etc lol
    this bike needed a 50 mm front mount allso sbp

    brad
     
  5. schulze 123

    schulze 123 Member

    Hi,
    I did some research on your motor and because it comes with just a centrifugal clutch centre (No bell or housing), it will be a bit more of a challenge to mount it in the frame but not impossible. Making the mounts is fairley straight forward, the main issue is finding a suitable clutch bell and housing that can be adapted to transfer the drive via a chain to the rear wheel.
    I know you didn't want to use a friction drive unit on the rear wheel but this motor will fit straight on with minimal effort if you did. Have a look at the drives from Bike Motor Parts.com as they have a belt drive system if you don't like the friction roller variety or here in Oz go to Rock Solid Engines.
    Hope this is of some help.

    Cheers BJ
     
  6. CHOPPERBIKEINOZ

    CHOPPERBIKEINOZ New Member

    Hi from Australia, SCHWINN STINGRAY 46cc

    Thanks for the help so far, Much appreciated

    Here is a pic of the clutch side showing the shaft which is 9/16" and has a flat area for a key way or grub/set screw?
    http://www.powersportsint.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Chung-Yang-R460-Engine-Clutch-side.jpg

    I am going to go for a mountain bike due to the larger size and front shocks etc available which will make it a bit more comfy to ride

    Can anyone tell me the common chain size used on the motorised bicycles?
    I would like to find which sprockets I can use on the engine shaft which will match up with the rear sprockets that bolt onto the rear wheel
    Can anyone show me where to buy a cheap as possible basic chain sprocket kit or even just the rear sprocket and mounting setup that bolts onto the rear wheel

    Any links with pics & build details etc of Bikes with a similar R460 46cc motor fitted in the frame rather than at the rear using a friction drive?
     
  7. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

  8. CHOPPERBIKEINOZ

    CHOPPERBIKEINOZ New Member

    Cool pics, Along the lines of what I wanna do

    What is the deal with the drive setup, Is see the chain runs down to the original bicycle front sprockets rather than driving the rear wheel directly using a large sprocket mounted on the back wheel?

    Could you possibly show me the details how your setup works and where to get the parts? I would like to know where to get the front sprocket to suit this motor especially

    Any pics of the right side of the white bike?

    Im planning on mounting the motor in the frame rather than off the side and running the chain back to the rear wheel on the left hand side
     
  9. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    Yes, the 460's power is geared to drive the bicycle's front chainring and its 8-speed cassette. This setup utilizes an obsolete Scooterguy frame-mount drive kit. Along with the brackets is a 5:1 pocket bike transmission. This bolts directly to the GP460 bell housing. An 11-tooth drive sprocket slips onto the transmission's spline. It then chains to a 63-tooth chainring which replaces the outer bicycle front sprocket. The inner bicycle front sprocket has 30 teeth and drives a bicycle chain to the derailleur. Gear ratio at this point is 28.64:1. First gear on the 8-speed cassette has 34 teeth, for a ratio of 32.46:1. Progressing through the gears, the ratio decreases to a final drive of 10.5:1.

    There is no machining involved in my installation. However, since I'm using 4-bolt freewheels at the front bike sprocket, the bike's chainring had to be drilled to bolt onto the freewheel.

    You can find everything you need from the pocketbike vendors online and from SBP (Sick Bike Parts).

    My friend's NuVinci gear ratio probably ranges from 38.35 to 7.67:1.

    What you are proposing for your 460 engine install is not practical. Why? Because this engine has a high-rpm power band. A single gear ratio will not be the right choice, especially when riding from flat ground to moderately steep hill. Halfhway uphill, the engine will bog down and expect you to pedal-assist to the top of the hill. The engine needs to have its revs up. There is no sprocket big enough to run on the left side without step-down gearing like a gearbox or more than one jackshaft. This engine loves to run with stiff gears, then cruise at 19:1 ratio.
    One possible way to frame-mount a small engine is to fab or buy a bracket to position the engine. Your clutch would need to face the bike's cassette's side. Then bolt a 5:1 pocket bike transmission on, with an 11-tooth spline. From there, you could follow my path thru the rear cassette.
    If you still wanted to utilize a left-side rear sprocket, run an 11-tooth drive sprocket to a 15-tooth jackshaft sprocket. You have 6.82:1 gear ratio at this point. On the left side of the jackshaft, install a 13-tooth sprocket, then chain it to a popular 36-tooth driven sprocket. That will give you a good start with final drive of 19.07:1.
    Good luck.
     
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