home made tools

Discussion in 'Spare Parts, Tools & Product Developement' started by hurricane, Nov 14, 2010.

  1. hurricane

    hurricane Member

    So everyone discovers along the way how to design things to work for themselves , weather it is a bike or a tool.

    I made this contraption today , I have limited garage /workshop space and the wife thinks she needs to always park her car in my workspace. So I killed two birds with one stone by consolidating my bench top drill press and 8"grinder, thus creating more room for me in the space I have. If you dont weld , you could easily do this with wood.

    I purchased wheels from harbor freight that lock, so this way i can easily move this tool around where ever I need it.

    enjoy

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    does anybody else make anything use full for space saving reasons ? I dont have a real easy workbench to use ,so Im putting my drill on the ground to use it and it is a pain. But this worked out well for me anyways.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 15, 2010

  2. Pablo

    Pablo Motored Bikes Sponsor

    Man - that's a good idea I can use! Thanks!
     
  3. hurricane

    hurricane Member

    Thanks Pablo,if a person did not want to use steel like i did . I thought it would also work just fine with 3/4" plywood and a 4x4 beam in center with a a couple gussets similar to a shelf hanger.
     
  4. loquin

    loquin Active Member

    Solid looking unit, hurricane. I think, if wood is used, they should add some weight at the bottom. Otherwise, it might be too easy to tip...

    I've also seen an arrangement where a single base has double french cleats on it, and each tool is mounted to a mating double french cleats. When a tool is needed, it's taken off the shelf, and 'slid into place.' Normally, a pin is used to hold the tool in position with this approach.
     
  5. hurricane

    hurricane Member

    Yea loquin, with wood a person would have to make the base wider is all. I was surprised at just how sturdy this stand is when the wheels are all locked.

    Do you have any pictures of the unit using those cleats ?
     
  6. loquin

    loquin Active Member

    They were in a woodworking magazine (tips by readers section)

    If I can find it, I'll scan that page.

    Meanwhile, take a look at the sketch below. This isn't anywhere close to scale; the side cleats would only be a couple of inches wide, and the center tool base is wide enough to hold the widest tool to be mounted. Since the tool slides into position, any through-bolts have to be countersunk into the bottom of the tool base. In addition, you would also want to have a stop on the back (not shown on the sketch)

    Typically, the material would be a good quality (Baltic Birch would be best,) 3/4 inch plywood.

    In the magazine, the guy had also mounted side cleats to the shelf the tools were stored on, so that he would slide the tool off the stand, temporarily setting it aside, slide the 'new' tool off the shelf and into position on the stand, and finally, slide the 'old' tool onto the shelf.

    After cutting the angles on the table saw, you would want to sand them fairly smooth (being careful to not change the angles) apply a polyurethane finish to the angled edges, and after the PE finish dries, only then do you do the final assembly of the cleats to the base (wood screws and wood glue.) (This lets you account for the thickness of the finish, so that you don't end up with a sloppy joint.) After the glue dries, you trim the outer edges, wax the cleat faces and you're good to go.

    About a year later, I saw a followup to the earlier tip; a guy had mounted a heavy-duty turntable to his bench, and had three tools at a time set up, 60 degrees apart. Two were permanently mounted (drill press and small band saw - the tools he used the most.) For the third position, he mounted a pairs of cleats to it (he had several other tools that he could slide into the cleated mount, depending on what he was doing.) He had three holes drilled into the turntable, and a single receiving hole drilled into the workbench, for locking the turntable into one of three positions.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  7. hurricane

    hurricane Member

    I did not grasp that all till I seen your diagram. Then the lights came on. that actually is a very good design and idea. thanks for the tip
     
  8. Turtle Tedd

    Turtle Tedd Member

    Hurricane..good design on that drill press/grinder rolling stand..looks pretty balanced out....As for that garage you got ,,looks huge compared to mine..put sheds in back yard for garden tools, lawnmowers ,extra furniture and all wifes stuff, vechicles have always stayed outside...told her house hers , garage mine..She hasnt made me move out here yet ,so after 40 years I guess it is still working...Now if I can only sneek this washer and dryer into the house somewhere, I can pick up a few more feet
     
  9. hurricane

    hurricane Member

    yea Turtle,its not bad sized for a garage i thinks its 24 x 24 , the problem is, we need it for storage on top of everything else I do in there , so it gets tight .Most all my shelving is on wheels so i can make use of every square inch of space. And where i live at i cant have another out building to use for storage. So it is a compromise for space in there.
     
  10. Turtle Tedd

    Turtle Tedd Member

    Have an idea for you...my garage has sort of loft in half of it..Ceiling height from cement floor is 8ft..bunch of 2x6s and plywood did the trick..plenty of storage up there, especially for a 24 x 24...Three 4inch I-Beams down the center of a 12foot span should be good for your bigger garage
     
  11. hurricane

    hurricane Member

    good idea Tedd, But I all ready beat ya too it. I have the "attic" filled with stuff also.. LOL
     
  12. loquin

    loquin Active Member

    Here's a bike work stand I built last year from scrap lumber - mostly 2x6.

    It's in two pieces, for easier storage.

    Plus, a couple of shots of another 'build' I did, for my wife's pre-school special ed class. It's 'Farm Month!' The two pieces clamp on to a standard pre-school/K tricycle. The kids seem to like it.

    Note the hitch on the back - she ties a wagon handle to the hitch, one kid pulls two more in the wagon... and, it tires out the "driver" - not a bad thing at times!
     

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    Last edited: Nov 16, 2010
  13. hurricane

    hurricane Member

    very nice and ez to build bike stand, I saved the images to add this to my inventory of home made tools.

    The trycycle is cool, I see you are like me and love to screw. haha
    I over compensate by using to many screws myself when building these kinds of projects, I really like deck screws cause there cheap and I have lots of them,plus construction adhesive..
     
  14. james65

    james65 Member

    homemade tools

    I taped a flashlight with an adjustable head to my auto darkening welding helmet.
    It keeps the weld location well lit when welding and moves with my head.
     
  15. hurricane

    hurricane Member

    Now thats amusing james, Ive been welding as a professional for over 26 years and never thought to do that. I always used trouble lights. good tip
     
  16. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon Active Member

    I like that stand, hurricane. I built one for my drill press years ago that had a rear shelf, which was where I put my scrollsaw (built it from wood. At the time I was doing a lot of intarsia work, and having the drill press right there was great. Unfortunately I no longer have the drill press or the stand.

    I have an el cheapo HF hand truck I am planning to mount a large base plate and a riser post to get my scrollsaw back up to a comfortable working height - with an integral hand truck rolling it into my little garden storage shed will be dead easy. This thread has me thinking about making it with an interchangeable mount on top - I'd like to be able to get my chop saw up to a comfortable working height.
     
  17. james65

    james65 Member

    Duct tape, Drywall screws , battrery drill, ty-raps, bailing wire, A GOOD VISE, fender washers, JB weld, RTV and (Large size asprin) are best inventions ever.
    When you mentioned deck screws these popped into mind.

    I work in my basement and have limited space so I am always looking for homemade shop/tool ideas.
    Especially if they are space saving. I already have pretty much wall to wall pegboard. I believe in organization by visibility.

    I also take pictures of the shop so that I can look and see if something is out of place or missing. The memory is not as good as a picture.
    It seems that most people on this board have creative juices flowing in them. When they share them, like in this thread it is rewarding for for all!



     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2010
  18. hurricane

    hurricane Member

    haha james , i like the picture idea. mostly for theft reasons to know what is actually missing. But I think i would do video instead, seems easier to me than pics.

    I thought of pegboard, my father is a huge fan of the stuff and i get alot of my organizational skills from him. But when i was younger i always had trouble getting the darn tools off the peg holders , so i always thought that when i got older I would never use pegboard. And to this day i have never purchased the stuff.


    Now you got me thinking on how to expand on my pedestal, i have a chop saw for wood that gathers dust due to me not having a nice place to set it other than the ground. I just might have to get the welder out and add something to my stand. great tip simon
     
  19. loquin

    loquin Active Member

    Use a lot of drywall screws in assembly. The bike stand was the first project that I started using polyurathane glue - the stuff is really messy when you're using it, and because it expands as it sets, it's easy to use too much, but it fills gaps, and the resulting joints are stronger than the wood. I've started using fewer screws with the polyurathane now - I tend to mark everything, do a dry fit, glue the parts, assemble, and pop some finish nails in with the air finish nailer I picked up last winter, just to hold things together until the glue sets.
     
  20. To gain more storage room in my shop I bought 6 gorilla racks shelving units. 4-24"x48"x72" and 2-18"x48"x72". I put two of the 48" units end to end, placed the 18" units end to end and parallel 6 feet on center and finally the last two 48" units end to end 6 feet on center. I placed 4 sheets of 3/4 plywood across the top and now have an "attic storage above the Gorilla racks. No if I could get the wife to stop going to yard sales!
     
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