how good r they

Discussion in 'Travelling, Commuting & Safety' started by photo245, Nov 11, 2010.

  1. photo245

    photo245 New Member

    i do a lot of bike traveling and i just bought a bike motor . I wonder just how good they really are. Will they go good long distances and will they carry the weight i carry it is useally around 50 or 60 lbs of gear? And i weigh 200 lbs i got the 80cc red bat engine off ebay. I wanna know so i can add the extra fuel bottles to my baggage im thinking about getting a trailer for my bike the kind walmart carries for you to put kids in and put alot of my supplies in it .
     

  2. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon Active Member

    photo, I would advise you that the quality of the HT engines (chinese 2 stroke in-frame mounted) is highly variable.

    The first thing you should do with any of them is to replace every nut/bolt/stud/screw in them with quality hardware - the stock stuff is basically pot metal.

    Second, do a very careful installation, and use the information readily available through this forum to improve some of the glaring weak points in the stock kits (clutch roller, chain tensioner, etc).

    Third, do a careful and conservative engine break-in.

    Fourth, before you sling your leg over the seat, check EVERYTHING to be sure it is properly tight.

    Fifth, if you are planning to do long distance travel with one of these engine kits as your prime mover, carry a tool kit including some zip ties, some loc-tite, tire/tube patching materials, a chain master link and chain tool, whatever basic handtools you think appropriate, and be prepared to patiently deal with break downs. The question isn't - will there be breakdowns? - it is, what will break down?
     
  3. photo245

    photo245 New Member

    thats what fot me wondering cause i always travel on bike and i guess if it breaks down depends on what breaks i can always just pedal again i guess i wont be using it full time anyway maybe although it does get hard to pedal with it on there i wonder if i need to go with frictin drive and never mind the motor and sprocket setup type
     
  4. augidog

    augidog Banned

    best consider all your options if you're serious.
     
  5. Stan4d

    Stan4d Banned

    Just one suggestion.....look through the threads here, look at the setup they used. That is the best test.
    One word of caution.....this is the internet, so judge carefully.
    I personally love my happy time. I ride it recreationally all of the time. If push came to shove, would I depend on it in a tight situation? Is a bear Catholic?
    Augi said it best, consider all options. But I would like to add......a Happy Time is not really an option.
    If in frame is your style I would go 4 stroke. If it does not matter......then there are many other options.
     
  6. Slackbiker

    Slackbiker Member

    I have been travelling for 3 summers and my 4-stroke Subaru is running fine, though the roller on my Staton friction drive has worn smooth, but runs fine in dry weather. The people on this forum, tend to go with quality systems for touring. I ran into a couple who were using "cheap" 2 stroke kits from King motors (which is having a huge sale, i notice) and Wally world trailers to go from Florida to Las Vegas, New Mexico. They had some fixable problems. So I say go for it, especially it that is what you have, and especially if you realize you can always pedal. Frankly i would probably just ditch my rig if it failed, with a "free bike" sign. Generally were talking $500 bucks, i've already got my moneys worth, in fact it has more than paid for itself in all the beer and food the curious have given me. People routinely ditch more valuable cars. I think it is important to get a free bike or $25 bike from a garage sale. To me that is the point. A motor turns a $25 bike into a $5,000 bike performance-wise. I've blown past the lycra types up mountain passes, though on some terrain they can beat a "heavy" tour bike (clap-clap, polite applause). Last year I went over the "Gila Monster" the same day as Lance. I had a motor of course, but then again he had a 15 pound bike, a police escort, a support crew, a hotel suite, etc, etc, Way to go, Lance! So, just do it. Sometimes i regret just starting with the cheapest kit out there, because there is a learning curve, and my O.K. system took a couple falls, and power-outs, and roller wear caused by a too good Kevlar tire, which grabbed road tar like a magnet. You can always upgrade, later.
     
  7. augidog

    augidog Banned

    "just go for it"...yes, there's that aspect to consider, too...there's a genuine feeling of pioneerism to long-riding that just can't be beat.

    when it comes to travelling with an HT, well i wouldn't do it but here's my input: i use a 40cc tanaka and carry almost 500lb of GVW, so i know a good-running 48cc HT can do it. i recommend the 48 as having proven itself to not beat itself up as quickly as the larger ones that merely add a bigger bore & piston to the same basic crank. and in the event of total breakdown, you can achieve good pedalling by taking the engine-chain off the rear sprocket but leaving it on the engine for easy re-assembly later.
     
  8. Slackbiker

    Slackbiker Member

    Oops i meant "Sometimes i regret NOT just starting with the cheapest kit out there". A Staton friction drive is pretty cheap, but there are cheaper kits, which could be used as a learning/experience tool, at least.
    Augi's more interested in "living out of his bike", and travelling in harsher (more adventurous) climes than I am. So that's a kind of consideration that is important. I am contemplating MBing the Great Divide trail eventually (to get off the roads), but my current rig would be a joke for me, though some crazy young types have done it on a unicycle.
     
  9. augidog

    augidog Banned

    say WHAT!? hehe...

    whoa there, pardner...trust me, if i could afford a motel every nite, i'd be there. if i could afford to both keep a home & travel, i'd do it. everything i own in the whole wide world goes with me on the bike. i sure ain't no grizzly-man, and i carry a LOT of extra "comforts" no (sane) bicyclist would ever consider...and if the (30mph) ride itself wasn't so gosh-darn wonderous, i'd just take (shudder) greyhound or (2 thumbs up) amtrak to 'suage my wanderlust :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2010
  10. quay1962

    quay1962 Guest

    Photo I would use the Happy Time as a true learning experience. Trust me when Augi says as he, me my husband and a few others all had 1 n they were always breaking something look at my photo album of quays first build.. i cant paste the link on a cell.. But that bike fell apart quick.. a fiore the whole thing incl. the engine was $600 bucks, well I ended up spending 700$ on a bike made by augi using the 4stroke robin/subaru 33cc.. i have used it as a comuter over 8000 miles got a flat once but never engine trouble so all I can say is don't count on it as a comuter but as a sunday drive kinda thingy. Good luck n enjoy the ride.
    PS..you do get what u pay for
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 16, 2010
  11. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon Active Member

    You know, I look at the discussion of in-frame mounts vs GEBE rack type mounts, and I have to ask - WHY?

    In-frame makes a lot of sense. It gets the engine mass low, it puts it in a semi-protected spot in the event of a spill, and it leaves the rear rack space for cargo. The GEBE ring doesn't care what angle the engine is at - what matters is that it be properly aligned and snug, to prevent belt jumping.

    The tadpole I am working on is going to be GEBE powered, with the engine right at hub height straight ahead of the wheel, and the whole thing monoshock suspended. By putting a pair of identical sprockets on my pivot axle for the rear suspension I avoid the need for a chain tensioner, and the rear hub will be a 3 speed Shimano internal rear end. The seat will be on a short suspension rig, able to absorb yet more of the road shocks. A pair of front disc brakes, and a pair of headlights that mount to the upper ends of the kingpins will give me good visibility that steers with the trike - I figure on using a pair of 12 volt gel cell batteries in parallel to give me at least 8 hours of lights front and rear.

    I was planning to construct an integral rear rack as a part of the rear suspension, but have decided that isn't necessary immediately - if my health ever gets to where I can do some long distance touring that will be time enough.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2010
  12. augidog

    augidog Banned

    firstly, it's my opinion that these engines weigh so little that c-o-g just isn't an issue. shoot, my butt weighs more than the tanaka, what do i care where the engine is? imo.

    having said that, i agree with you...if my frame was a tad longer (a matter of pedal clearance) my gebe mount would be anchored on the chain-stays. cargo-master's considering an extracycle extension for his puegot and just this afternoon we discussed using this method for his gebe setup.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2010
  13. wbuttry

    wbuttry Member

    well if i got the motor with the belt or the rollers i wouldnt be able to put my panniers on my bike in the back and i would half to run a trailer or something or i guess i could get a push trailer instead but i use comfort bike in stead of road bikes road bike seem to fragile for my 200 lb body and 60 lbs of gear by the way i was photo245 lost my log in so had to re sign up but any way this cruiser i got is my learning curve bike it is a lot different than peddling to balance yourself and the motor weight isnt to bad my problem comes in on clutching and braking all at the same time i try to apply my clutch then brakes but since my coasters dont work good with out the handle attached to the frame i gotta get some clamp brakes and hope that works i've had it for a good month and just now getting it to where i can ride it with out much problems im 37 and never rode a motor cycle so this is my iniation in to the world of motorized to wheel hotrods:bowdown:
     
  14. wbuttry

    wbuttry Member

    here is my touring bike i used im going with something different soon
     

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  15. Slackbiker

    Slackbiker Member

    I went non-motorized tour biking for 2 summers (~5-6 months each), before switching to MB. I think non-motorized is a good experience. I didn't lose too much "storage" by going with a Staton friction drive. I roped a basket on the mounting bracket and U-bracket, so i only lost the one side. Plus you can use the top of the Black housing. One year i had a real Jed Clampett bike with a childs golf bag with a guitar bungeed to the top of the housing bracket.
     
  16. wbuttry

    wbuttry Member

    heres my motorized bike. rode it all day today tighning up every thing and adding thick foam rubber in places that vibrated. I got all the rattles stopped and actually hit 33 mph with it today. Never gone that fast on a bicycle before the cops never said a word. I even sat there and talked to two of them . Talked about mileage and type of oils and general chit chat. Then fired up and went riding again .They told me to be careful and keep on my helmet .
     

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  17. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    Don't starve it for oil, and use good plugs. It might last longer than you expect.
     
  18. wbuttry

    wbuttry Member

    oh yes it gets 8ozs of oil to every gallon of fuel and i mix it in the jug real good before i even pour it in my gas tank i wanna have it for a long time and i got a extra plug for it in case i need it i love it it is a lot of fun im wanting to build a non powered trailer to add to it i got a great idea how im gonna do it to it will be a single wheel trailer to ride this thing to go camping on this year with 4.00 gas i will leave the van home and just use this bad machine thats one reason i wandered how how good and dependable they were my camping spots are at lake wappapello mo im 50 mile one way from it and wanna have fun this spring
     
  19. wbuttry

    wbuttry Member

  20. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    It looks like your computer reset bc. of the electrical interference. I had the problem for a long time. I think I have it solved now, by mounting the computer on a swath of electrical tape and using an RF choke (those magnets that go on TV cables and old computer monitors). I didn't like the fuel line that came with the kits. I think its just a temporary fix. It looks flimsy.

    Thanks for the video. The motor sounds pretty quiet. Many of these bikes are quieter than pickup trucks and weedwhackers. Mine is kind of loud though. It keeps most animals out of the way but dogs have a taste for it.
     
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