How much will the HT chain stretch?

Discussion in 'Frame Mounted Engines' started by macarollo, Aug 27, 2008.

  1. macarollo

    macarollo Guest

    I have almost put an enitre gallon of gas through my happy time engine. The chain has stretched quite a bit.

    Is there a point where the chain stops stretching? Or will I have to adjust the chain tensioner the whole life of the bike?
     

  2. Simon_A

    Simon_A Member

    It will settle and stop stretching, but yeah the stock chain stretches like elastic when first used.
     
  3. stude13

    stude13 Active Member

    the fix is #41chain
     
  4. HoughMade

    HoughMade Guest

    I have a tendency to agree with that.
     
  5. It's not just the chain that stretches,mind you. The sprockets settling down with the chain is a factor. The stock roller wearing down is another rather big factor.
    Get in the habit of checking your chain,adjusting your tensioner,and grab that oil squirt can and put some here and there before EACH RIDE and you won't have a chain failure.
    Sometimes the stretch from those three factors may warrant you removing a link so check that every time before a ride.
    That will avoid 90% of your breakdowns down the road.
     
  6. Skyliner70cc

    Skyliner70cc Active Member

    The fix is to make sure the chain is shortened so it is very tight when first installed. It will then naturally stretch a bit which will be perfect with a roller. I used to setup my chain so it was a little loose and then end up cutting the chain twice to shorten it.
     
  7. Honda50

    Honda50 Member

    I too was wondering how long the stretch-in period lasts. I have kept my chain clean and lube it up with Teflon chain lube. When I adjust mine, I'm careful not to place too much tension on the drive train, maintaining a little slack. When I accelerate, I tend to go easy at throttle opening from idle speed as not to rapidly and violently 'jerk' the slack out of the chain. I have already removed a link since the initial ride.

    I have a Staton Chain drive. As time goes on, the stretch rate does seem to subside. I always give the bike a pre-flight check before I get on it and roll.

    I'm hooked on my MB!
     
    sactownie likes this.
  8. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    Hi Honda50 - that's some SOUND CHAIN advice

    yes - all chains are going to stretch - more when new - far less later

    one can adjust a chain pretty darn tight when new
    knowing that it is going to stretch out anyway
    this is NOT THE BEST - in my opinion
    would rather make more adjustments -- less stress on drive train

    don't want that chain in the spokes ----
    slight lube on chain
    chain adjusted just right - tension
    chain and sprockets all lined up ?

    should make for a -- Ride That Thing - Mountainman
     
  9. Honda50

    Honda50 Member

    Indeed, sprocket/chain alignment is a very crucial factor when it comes to chain life. I'm toying with the idea of fabricating a simple functioning tensioner assembly to be mounted on the 'slack' side of my drive chain.

    We'll see how this stretches out before I add a tensioner assembly.
     
  10. BSA

    BSA Guest

    Thread moved.

    BSA
     
  11. s_beaudry

    s_beaudry Member

    Since installing mine, I have retightened it 5 or 6 times, including moving the tensioner 1 time....

    Never knew metal stretches that much!
     
  12. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    well let's see here
    it's not really the metal stretching
    more like the connecting parts of the chain are wearing together
    we find more of this (faster wearing) in less expensive chains

    I think s_beaudry -- your chain is almost broken in
    shouldn't have to adjust it as much from now on
    but - if you do ---
    might want to think about upgrading chain

    Happy Riding from - Mountainman
     
  13. Honda50

    Honda50 Member

    I'm wondering if there is a general rule for the proper amount of 'deflection per foot', similar to a drive belt deflection, that we could use as a guideline.

    For example: 1/4" per foot, etc?
     
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