I have to pedal my HT build for 1-2 mins before the motor kicks in! He

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by jamesloper, Oct 7, 2010.

  1. jamesloper

    jamesloper New Member

    Making this bike has been AWESOME. It's just getting broken in (got 30 miles on it so far) but one problem:

    When I haven't ridden it in a few hours, I'll start pedaling, release the clutch, then for about 1-2 mins I have to pedal like theres no tomorrow. While the clutch is released and I'm pedaling, I hear the engine doing *something*...The pitch of whatever puttering sound its making changes as I change the position of the throttle but the engine doesn't actually propel me at all. It just makes noise. Now eventually it will start lunging forward for what seems like 1 revolution of the engine. Little blasts of power. And the frequency of the lunges will increase over the next 15 or so seconds until the engine is all warmed up and BAM high power awesomeness. From then on out, its AWESOME but I want to know how I can make it start up/warm up faster so I don't have to exhaust myself pedaling like crazy in the beginning.

    TL;DR: I have to pedal for 1-2 mins before the motor kicks in.

    Thanks MBc!
     

  2. Sgt. Howard

    Sgt. Howard Member

    I will start with a stupid question- are you familiar with the choke?
    the Old Sgt.
     
  3. jamesloper

    jamesloper New Member

    Haha I hope its that simple. The choke is set all the way down...is that the problem?
     
  4. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    Try using various positions of choke, although I don't ever have to touch mine. Also there is a small button on the top of the carb. Sometimes it's helpful to press it down a few times. That button moves the float so the fuel bowl can fill up.
     
  5. Sgt. Howard

    Sgt. Howard Member

    Actually, pull it all or most of the way up- do your start-up. Once you hear it start to kick, play with the throttle while you lock the clutch in disengage. Then reach down and slowly push the choke lever down by degree untill it hits the higher RPMs- then pedal up to speed and engage the clutch. How fast you can turn it off depends on local temperature, humidity, the number of cats that have wizzed on the tire and the fluctuations of the Dow-Jones. Just play it by ear... Here in Eastern Washington at this time of year it tends to get a bit nippy in the AM, I crank it all the way up and turn it about half-way untill I've gone about 150 to 200 feet and then turn it off.
     
  6. jamesloper

    jamesloper New Member

    I've tried tickling the choke and I can visibly see the gas goin in but it didn't seem to help. Maybe it lessens the time needed to warm up. I will check tomorrow. Thanks for the help.
     
  7. jamesloper

    jamesloper New Member

    Hmmm up all the way...I'll try that too.
     
  8. RedBaronX

    RedBaronX Member

    mine was that bad when it was new. now that I have a couple hundred miles on it, it starts within a block or so from a cold start. About half choke works best for me for starting
     
  9. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member


    what you are talking about "tickling" is the carb primer probably.
    you push the primer button down a few times, which makes the float go up & down. this in turn "floods" the cylinder with some extra gas to help get the engin estarted.
    flip the choke lever all the way up (choke closed) and try to start it. when you hear it fire, flip the choke lever down a little at a time and work the throttle. eventually you should have the choke lever all the way down (choke open) once the engine gets warmed up a little.
    you need the choke in colder weather or it will take a long time for the engine to fire up. in colder weather, you need the choke because it richens the fuel-air ratio, (more gas than air)which makes it easier to start.
     
  10. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    it takes a block or so for you to get your engine running on a cold start?

    wow, i can get my engine running on a cold start (below 50 degrees outside) in my driveway which is less than 30 feet long.
    pump the primer 4-5 timers, flip the choke up, coast down the driveway about 1/2 way, pop the clutch and pow...mine is running. flip the choke down and i'm good to go.
     
  11. jamesloper

    jamesloper New Member

    Alright here's what happened: Went outside, cold day in Michigan. I flipped the choke all the way up and poked the primer about 5 times. I released the clutch and pedaled. Pop! Got some immediate lurches. But they didn't last and I pedaled for about 2 more mins until finally I decided it wasn't going to work and so I flipped the choke all the way down and it immediately started working.

    By the way, I never really have gotten the bike to work with the choke in the top position. I think it starves the engine of fuel/air too much.
     
  12. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    the reason that it immediately started after flipping the choke down is because when you were trying to start it with the choke in the up position, it loaded the cylinder with fuel.
    with the choke in the up position, it does not starve the engine of fue/air...it makes it so the engine does not take it too much air.
    more gas/ less air makes for easier starting. when you flip the choke down, you are "adding" more air to make it run right.

    you will have to play with the choke and it's settings to get the hang of it.
    i mean seriously, i flip my choke up, push the primer 4-5 times, coast down my driveway, pop the clutch and the motor starts. before it does, i reach down and flip the choke all the way down and work the throttle.
    it's just that easy...and i NEVER have to use the choke if the air temp is about 60 degrees.
     
  13. Sgt. Howard

    Sgt. Howard Member

    it is also possible that my choke won't fully close off the throat of the carb- quality control on these things is no better than it ought to be- motorpsycho's regimen might be just the ticket, play with it until you find out what works. In fact, once you get a pop, turn the handle either half-way or all the way down and see if that doesn't settle the issue.
    the Old Sgt.
     
  14. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    well, if you take off the air filter and close the choke, you will be able to see the choke plate. you will be able to see if it is fully covering the carb throat when you have the choke closed (lever in the up position).
    the choke plate has a hole in the center to allow a precise amount of air through, so even when the choke is fully closed, you are still not blocking off all of the air. by closing the choke you are reducing the amount of air, but increasing the speed of the air that is being sucked into the carb. the hole in the carb plate creates a venturi effect. the smaller the hole, the faster air will move when it's sucked into the carb.(a venturi looks like an hour glass)
    think of it the same as when you have a garden hose with no sprayer on the end of it., the water just kind of lazily flows out of the end, as soon as you put your thumb over the end of the hose, you have reduced the flow, but increased the pressure or speed, which makes the water spray out of the hose.
    it's the same thing when you close the choke. the choke plate is acting as your thumb over the end of a garden hose.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2010
  15. Skyliner70cc

    Skyliner70cc Active Member

    A lot of the HT carbs chokes are flimsy and will not work, e.g. actually more the flat slide that covers the intake to perform the choke function.
     
  16. jamesloper

    jamesloper New Member

    Well I filled up my tank, gapped my sparkplug to .026 mm (it's mm right?), had the choke all the way down, and ***on the first cycle*** the engine kicked in full blast. Crazzyyyy!! I think it's because the tank was fuller and hence wanted to push more gas into the carb. Anyway, my bike now starts up immediately! Thanks for all the help :)
     
  17. Skyliner70cc

    Skyliner70cc Active Member

    Glad to see you got it figured out. None of my engines start at full choke. Its always 1/2 to 3/4 chocke. What I do now is drill the hole out slightly larger on the choke valve so full choke allows engine to start. Otherwise I would fiddle with choke as I pedaled.

    New engines are sometimes harder to start and a little bit of breaking helps rings seal a little better.
     
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