I love this Shift Kit

Discussion in 'Spare Parts, Tools & Product Developement' started by Macon, Dec 5, 2008.

  1. Macon

    Macon New Member

    I finally got around to installing my shift kit from Sick Bike Parts , and I must say it adds a whole new relam to motor biking. I put my motor and kit on an old ten speed touring bicylce, with back sprockets from 14 to 28 teeth which gives me a nice choice of riding ranges. The bike has 1 3/8's X 26" wheels which makes for smooth rolling resistance. I was surprized to see how well my bike climbed up a steep hill in Fremont , CA. , and I weigh the better part of 225. Jim has been very helpful with the few technical questions I had about the installation. Now when I go riding its nice to know that if I want to go faster than 15 mph I don't have to deal with the high rpm's and vibration plus the fun of shifting makes for a more interesting ride. Learning to start the motor from a pedal startup is a little tricky at first, but it is a skill you quickly master as long as your motor is in a good tuned up state. For the first time I can truly tell someone that my bike will really go 35 mph, although I rarely take it passed 28 mph. If anybody has any question about the shift kit's proformance feel free to ask. Macon
     

  2. Pablo

    Pablo Motored Bikes Sponsor

    Good going, and glad to get the feedback!!:helmet:


    Ride on :jester: and have a great and festive :santa::santa3::elf: Holiday Season!!
     
  3. ollicat

    ollicat Member

    Can you tell me how many of your gears the shift kit actually uses? Do you find yourself skipping gears during the acceleration process? What about slowing down?
     
  4. Pablo

    Pablo Motored Bikes Sponsor

    I can't speak for Macon, but I use all my gears most of the time, but sometimes I skip gears. Not as much as Jim does in our video. I live in a pretty hilly area so I run through the gears without skipping, to keep the RPM's as even as possible. Slowing down, if I'm coming to a stop, I just put it into first from whatever gear I'm in.
     
  5. ollicat

    ollicat Member

    Thanks for the info Pablo. Also, how does one shift? Do you need to let off the throttle to shift?
     
  6. Pablo

    Pablo Motored Bikes Sponsor

    Like riding a bicycle. Just click the shifter (I like a grip shifter). Yes - It is best to let off power (no need to clutch). I have power shifted to hammer on my deraileur - just to see if it would explode or something. It didn't. But speed/power shifting under full throttle is a bit jarring and eventually it must be pretty hard on the whole drive train.
     
  7. ollicat

    ollicat Member

    I see. Sorry for so many questions Pablo. I am still quite new to this. One more question about the clutch. If a guy wants to ride around with the engine off, I think one pulls the clutch in. Is there a way to lock the clutch in for a longer ride? I would think your hand would get fatigued after a while otherwise.

    Thanks for the practical help.
     
  8. Pablo

    Pablo Motored Bikes Sponsor

    So you don't have a MB? There is a push button lock for the clutch lever.
     
  9. bikebum1975

    bikebum1975 Member

    I have an old Schwinn Continetal ten speed I am going to put an engine on it in the spring. It has down tube style shifters on it but the are on the head tube will the shift kit work with those type of shifters? I would really like to keep them if possible. Once I get the bike built I will be putting up some photos for every one. I have to say this is one of the best sites on the internet. Thanks for you help in advance
    Jim
     
  10. Pablo

    Pablo Motored Bikes Sponsor

    It will work fine with any shifter style you like.
     
  11. Skyliner70cc

    Skyliner70cc Active Member


    All MB kits come with a locking clutch. There are 2 styles of locking clutch lever. The older style locks automatically when you pull the lever in to disengage the clutch, the newerstyle requires you to push down on a "button" to lock the clutch lever but releasing the clutch is automatic.

    Riding the bike with the clutch lever locked out (disengaged) does result in some frictional losses and noticeable effort in pedaling since you are spinning extra rotational mass and do have some very minor clutch drag even with clutch locked out.
     
  12. Macon

    Macon New Member

    Ollicat, I like the 5 speed rear gear setup the best. The ratio is 14 to 28 tooth sprockets and I don't skip gear that often on the up shifting. When I slow down I to stop I will most of the time let off on the gas to an idle and let the gear sprocket go to the largest one the same way I would if I was just normally pedaling. This was the 3rd bike that I built. The 1st one had a 44 tooth sprocket, which rode nice on level ground but over 18 mph there was to much vibration. Also I had to pedal hard to make it up most of the hills. My 2nd bike I installed a 50 tooth sprocket which helped on the hill , but over 14 mph there was to much vibration. This is why I was so glad to see that Pablo and Jim designed this useful modification. Someday I would like to install a rear spocket setup 6 speed 11 to 34 tooth. Pablo if you read this what does the 14 to 28 = in a 415 sprocket size and how about the 11 to 34 size? Or would that just be over doing it alittle? There another thing that I enjoy about this kit and that is when you're normally pedaling, there is about 1/3 less resistance.
     
  13. Ghost0

    Ghost0 Guest

    Macon,
    A 14-28 rear cassette gives you a range in sprocket sizes in the stock terminology of a 29 to a 58. The 11-34 would give you a 23 to a 70 range. I run a 13-34 six speed which gives me a 27 to a 70 range.

    And I agree it makes pedaling much easier. Not only is there less rotating mass but you can actually coast which can make each pedal stroke more efficient.
     
  14. Skyliner70cc

    Skyliner70cc Active Member

    My Schwinn Skyliner has a 11-34 Mega range cassette and it is perfect for mountain climbing and cruising and helps squeeze as much of the engine's available (decreased) power at my altitude (about 1% loss in horsepower for every 1000 foot gain in altitude). I live at 6600 feet and often cycle at much higher altitudes.
     
  15. RedGreen

    RedGreen Member

    Disc brake for Nuvinci?

    I noticed that Pablo's site mentions the use of a nuvinci which sounds just perfect. Problem, I am currently using a coaster brake. Can a disk brake be fitted to a nuvinci? I would have to build brackets onto the frame to mount caliper type brakes.
     
  16. Pablo

    Pablo Motored Bikes Sponsor

    I'm no Nuvinci hub expert, but I would think a disk brake would be quite doable. Maybe ask clotho.
     
  17. mabman

    mabman Member

    The Nuvinci will handle any standard 6 bolt pattern disc.
     
  18. Pablo

    Pablo Motored Bikes Sponsor

    Thanks mabman!!! You are the man.
     
  19. RedGreen

    RedGreen Member

    Can you provide anymore info on this? I have never dealt with disc brakes before.
    Any thoughts on which disc brakes would work the best? I assume that you would have to weld a couple of mounting points to the frame for the brake calipers.
     
  20. mabman

    mabman Member

    Sure. There are several ways to convert over to disc on a frame. What you need is something that provides a mount for the caliper down at the dropout that will interface with the disc mounted to the wheel.

    http://www.therapycomponents.com/conversion.htm

    This one is nice in that it provides extra support via the mount to the brake brazeon on the seatstay.

    http://www.a2zcomponents.com/OLD-web/Adapter/adap01.htm

    This one is simpler without the extra brace and thus cheaper. Look for both on eBay for the best deal?

    There is another even cheaper solution that is available but I can't seem to find my link to it right now.

    As far as the brake itself go with a good mechanical like the Avid BB7. I have had good luck with the Hayes MXIII also but none of the other Hayes models. Shimano also makes a mechanical disc brake but I have no experience with them.

    A good site to find out more about these is MTBR.com. Go to the review section and you should find some info there.

    One thing for sure is that disc's are the best stopping power available for bicycles at this time, rain or shine, and even work with a warped wheel well enough to get you home. As much weight as our bikes are carrying we need all the help we can get! But a well tuned set of V brakes will get the job done also.
     
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