If you ever ride a fixed gear bicycle... DON'T forget what you're riding!!

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by sparky, Aug 13, 2011.

  1. sparky

    sparky Active Member

    I was going downhill.

    Been on this bike for a good long time now... And I remind others when they hop on it that: "It's a fixie!"

    But I still forgot about it for just one instance while dreaming downhill. What was I dreaming of? I wish I could remember.


    If you have a flip-flop hub, tho, I'd designate the track sprocket for the track and the freewheel for the road. If you ride long enough, you will forget that you're riding a fixed gear.. and all it takes is half a second..


    :cool2:
     

  2. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Well-Known Member

    Continue to pedal through the turns or wear long sleeves. I recently helped a friend of mine build a fixie. He is a strong rider (I did the MS 150 with him). After hitting a good headwind on the FM road, he is looking into a 2 speed kickback hub.
     
  3. sparky

    sparky Active Member

    Since my fixie is a 29'er, I have no problems around turns, but others should definitely pay attention to their angle around turns!!

    I've never heard of a kick-back hub until today! Thanks!!

    That "blue band" Bendix looks like what I want. I have the problem with headwinds every once in a while, but there's an easy enough solution to that -- bend down. :)

    My major problem seems to be keeping up with road bikes when going downhill. I argue with them all the time about how their wheels are too narrow and their pedaling is too sloppy... but they always laugh when pulling away from the top of a bridge.

    I've never liked coaster brakes, but I guess I could get used to it for the safety aspect when "coming off" a "fixie high".
     
  4. srdavo

    srdavo Active Member

    I have an old yellow band Bendix.

    044.jpg

    It's missing a spoke & the tire size is 1 & 3/4" (not 1.75).

    Makes a difference... fractional sized tires are sometimes harder to find.

    This would be easier to lace into a modern 26" rim. (in order to find a variety of common tires)
     

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  5. lowracer

    lowracer Member

    I've got 6 bikes now, 3 of them are 'Motored' & 3 are 'Pedal only'.
    2 out of the 3 'pedal only' bikes are fixies set up with aero bars & Adamo tri saddles.
    I love riding fixed gear & believe it makes one a stronger rider, having to muscle & spin instead of gearing down for hills or speed.
    -Lowracer-
     
  6. sparky

    sparky Active Member

    I love fixed gears, when I'm not daydreaming.

    I ordered a Sturmey-Archer S2 kick-switch / kick-back hub for my fixed gear. It adds a 138% larger high gear for only $60 (plus about $200 to get a new rim w/ new spokes trued :-/).

    Might be a while before I actually get around to lacing it, due to other projects, but it'll happen.

    I have always wanted two speeds. And I've never liked derailers, cables, levers, etc.... so this is just perfect.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2011
  7. sparky

    sparky Active Member

    I wonder if I should lace the Sturmey Archer S2 up to a motorized bike with jack shaft kit!!

    :tt1::tt1::tt1:
     
  8. retromike3

    retromike3 Member

    fixed gear are cool

    I have a fixed gear because they are very simple. I do go with a front brake(I like to stop when I have to) but other than that it has nothing extra.

    Even though my motor bicycle is much more complicated it can get me to places I just can't do on my fixed. Now that I am over the hill I can still hop on my motor bicycle and actually get to were I need to go and not be wiped out physically when I show up.

    Lately I have been riding my fixed inside on rollers. I have a set of "ride" tunes on my MP3 player and I just go at it.

    I do have a set of Scott aro clip ons that work really well outside but look kind of silly riding on rollers.

    mike
     
  9. lowracer

    lowracer Member

    retromike3,
    I go with the front brake too...
    Gotta stop...lol
    -Lowracer-
     
  10. lowracer

    lowracer Member

    Fixie

    Here's a pic of my training machine
    -Lowracer-
     

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  11. retromike3

    retromike3 Member

    nice bike.

    looks like a nice bike, the only thing I might look at is the saddle position. looks like it might be tilted down a bit to much. Back when dinosaurs ruled the earth the track coach of the US ream told me to set the saddle so that top was level. if you do that you might have to lower you seat a bit to compensate.

    Here's my bike Its set up a lot like yours, its got a old set of Cennelli bull horns with an Original set of Scott clip-on's that Greg Lamond used to win the tour back in 89.

    mike
     

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    Last edited: Aug 30, 2011
  12. lowracer

    lowracer Member

    retromike3,
    Sweet bike...
    I can't tell you how many times I've adjusted the saddle on my 8 bikes but its been a bunch. The one with the saddle slightly down is actually perfect for the position I am in 90% of the time. I ride in the aerobars and when the body is that low & forward, the saddle has to accomodate. I also use the Adamo Race saddle which has a forked frontal area to eliminate numbness...works like a charm.
    Here is a another of my bikes I ride, but in a different more upright position...
    -Lowracer-
     

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  13. retromike3

    retromike3 Member

    another sweet bike

    looks like you have got the answers for your riding. Sometimes I just can't keep my mouth shut :whistling:. When I built that frame I set I up to ride like the guy who set up the "Superman" position. Its got a really long top tube and super short chain stays. I built it with Tange number one tubes and Columbus lugs I also set it up with the last pair of Campy rear track ends I could find. I also set it up with Campy Record hubs (pre-super) and Victoria sew-ups. It does have a SR aluminum front fork. But for some reason it will not go as fast as I used to go when I was thirty five(gasp-choke)

    I still ride it, but with those wheels I have them mainly for rollers. I have a pair of heaver clinchers for riding on the road. There is nothing like the feeling you get when you can spin up a fixed and get that "direct" contact to the road. Its just you and the bike. Not exactly the same felling I get when I ride my motor bicycle.

    Back when I thought I was fast I learned that there were levels that I couldn't even touch and they had folks that could clean their clocks. Thats when I retired to the home for the perpetually slow and got a recumbent and now a motor bicycle.

    mike
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2011
  14. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

  15. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

  16. lowracer

    lowracer Member

    retromike3,
    We have a similar history. I raced mountainbikes & then got into recumbents, then racing recumbents (hence the nickname Lowracer), then faired recumbents & trikes, then road bikes & fixies, & most recently motorized bicycles. Who knows, maybe adding an engine to a fully faired trike would be the next step in this progression? I think it would make a wonderful hybrid velomobile if only traffic lanes were wide enough for cars & trikes...
    -Lowracer-
     
  17. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    I think a faired trike would be awesome! I expect ultralight vehicles to be the future of American urban transportation, like Asia before they got all our jobs. Stuff that gets high gas mileage and goes 30-60mph. Who really needs to go faster, esp when you are trying to save gas?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djLZ4i4rq_o Ecomobile Swiss recumbent 2 seat motorcycle with fully fairing covered body/cockpit. It's like a plane with no wings! (120mph max)
     
  18. lowracer

    lowracer Member

    happycheapskate,
    Cool video.
    I had a 3/4 faired Greenspeed GTR trike (just my head stuck out) but back then, it was only Human powered. Was fairly fast (compared to an unfaired road bike) & was great in crosswinds which a two wheeled faired recumbent is not...(had a Lightning F40 for awhile too). I think a gas engine on the mostly faired trike would be ideal except for the extra width.
    -Lowracer-
     
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