LandRider Hill Rider

Discussion in 'Video Gallery' started by LR Jerry, Apr 7, 2013.

  1. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    This was shot on a very steep hill.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 15, 2015

  2. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    You've got to be kidding me - a steep hill - where - where is the steep hill?

    Now point the bike up a 22% gradient and accelerate from a standing start with 100 lbs of bicycle trailer behind you, because that's my benchmark baseline.
     
  3. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    This was shot from a cellphone. So its hard to tell how steep the hill is. I can coast to over 30 mph going down it and probably would be able to go faster if not having to stop for a stop sign. I live in a valley I could go about 10 miles down the road for even steeper hills.

    Another thing to consider is I'm only using a 33 cc 1.6 HP engine. My bike weighs 89 lbs and I weigh 250 lbs. The next video I make I'll place a 8 foot 2x4 on the road with a protractor on it.

    Here is how deceptive a camera can be.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 15, 2015
  4. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    Here is how deceptive a photo can be: must be about a 100% gradient but it only looks like a 45% gradient - no need to get out an 8 foot 2x4 on the road with a protractor on it.

    Now we are talking turkey !!!


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  5. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    IMAG0096.jpg

    My back yard is on a 20% grade. The only way to see that is by looking at my neighbor's porch.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2013
  6. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    Better you go out there and get that 8 foot 2x4 with a protractor on it.
     
  7. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    Used a piece of unistrut instead of a 2x4.
    IMAG0098.jpg
    IMAG0097.jpg

    Slopes vs. gradients vs. % grades are indicated below:

    Slope (degrees) !Y ! X ! % grade
    11° ! 1 ! 5.145 ! 19.4%
    12° ! 1 ! 4.705 ! 21.3%

    % grade is 100 * Y/X (vertical rise / horizontal distance)

    As you can see 11.5 ° is a 20% grade.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 18, 2015
  8. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    I'm not so sure.
    Maybe the is a bit of cheating going on. The first photo is not clear enough to read the number scale and the second photo is a closeup that does not show an 8 foot 2x4 with a protractor on it.

    A Unistrut might be giving false readings and it doesn't qualify because it's not an 8 foot 2x4.
    When was the last time you seen a Unistrut growing on trees, and when was the last time you seen a Unistrut being defended by environmentalists; preventing the lumberjack from cutting it down.

    I've never seen a cabinet maker working with Unistruts to make a set of stairs or a door or a crystal cabinet, because it's not made of wood, and this may very well affect the result.

    I'll believe it when i see you use an 8 foot 2x4 that has been certified by the American Lumber Foundation, complete with a photo of the certification documentation and a photo of the certifier holding a copy of the local newspaper with the date clearly visible, as well as the documentation being signed by a justice of the peace.

    In this day and age of cheating, you can't be too careful.
     
  9. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    IMAG0097.jpg
    There's a right triangle right above the protractor. Some 8th grade level math is all it would take to figure it out.
     
  10. sdframe

    sdframe New Member

    Very impressive, Jerry! Where do you get a freewheel crank? That is cool!
     
  11. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    Staton Inc is where I got mine.
     
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