lighting problem

Discussion in 'Electrical' started by motorbike-scubaguy, Feb 5, 2013.

  1. motorbike-scubaguy

    motorbike-scubaguy New Member

    so I have a 12v lighting system and its not working. I have

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/380455969562?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/261042996891?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/150967964107?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/400108733087?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649

    all the connections are tight. the blinkers and horn are run off a 12v battery and are wired into my multi switch. the led lights i am tring to run off the generator. i checked connection with a multi meter and all was good. but when the motors on the led lights wont work. when they are hooked to the battery they work good. im thinking that because the generator is putting out ac it wont run my led lights. so i am thinking i should eather get a rectifier or run a charging setup for the battery. its about the same cost. what are your guys thoughts on this? i can post a few pic in a day or two.:helpsmilie:
     

  2. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

    The LED's are set up for DC. That "generator" puts out AC.
    While the actual LED's themselves don't really care if they are getting either AC or DC, the circuitry inside the lights most likely do.
    Also the lights are rated at consuming 9 watts each.
    The Mini Gen Max is rated at 5 to 10 watts. Considering that it is advertised to be used with either a 6 or 12 volt output, most likely it is 5 watts with a 12 volt load, 10 watts with a 6 volt load.
    I believe that you are asking more from the Mini Gen Max than it is capable of producing.
     
  3. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Member

    For a period of time, I ran three LED (4 watts each) lights off a 12 v ac 6 watt dynamo/alternator, but these LED lights do not have an integrated circuit and seemed to care less if ac/dc or how +/- is hooked up to them so long as juice flows. But I know some LED lights will only function if the +/- is connected correctly.

    I have since purchased a small 12v dc 7 amp sealed lead acid battery for $17.00 with free shipping from Amazon, so will now be using it for lights. I have been told that one of the little $22.00 Wal-Mart small battery charger/maintainers wired to the ac dynamo/alternator will change the ac in to dc out and charge the battery I bought. Don’t know if for true, but I am going to give it a go and see.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2013
  4. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Member

    So much for the Wal-Mart small battery charger/maintainer working, no go, must require 110 ac in.
     
  5. motorbike-scubaguy

    motorbike-scubaguy New Member

  6. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Member

    I went for a $3.00 Radio Shack full wave rectifier for charging battery. Don't need a capacitor, as the pulsating DC charges the battery just fine.
     
  7. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Well-Known Member

    I tried running 6v lights from my engine white wire for a spell. I blew bulbs often and tired of tending to the wiring. To me, it is simpler to just run battery powered lights. Today's battery powered lights can be very inexpensive and give long battery life for the amount of light produced. I carry a backup set of lights at night whether I am running on battery or white wire power.
     
  8. Stoltzee

    Stoltzee Member

    From what I've been researching I've discovered that to charge a 12 volt 1.2/.3 Ah battery you need to add 2.45 volts off the alternator, or 14.45 volts. More than that and the battery may possibly explode. Luckily for me I've found an adjustable AC voltage regulator. It adjust between 12 volts to 16 volts by the turn of a screw.
    If you use one on both sides of the battery you can adjust the brightness of your lights, or at least in theory. HA HA! trail-tech-regulator-2T.jpg
     
  9. KCvale

    KCvale Motorized Bicycle Vendor

    My philosophy concerning MB lighting is pretty simple.

    1. You want every ounce of power your little 2-stroke motor can produce to the wheel unencumbered by anything correct?
    Anything you attach to share that power be it the Aux magneto wire or any tire rubbing or hub generated power is robbing you of that motion power with a load to generate electricity because unless you have some system to generate power using a gen as a brake you are using your gas and power to do it.

    2. Lithium Ion Re-Chargeable Batteries are cheap now, hold a big punch, and can power all your lighting needs for weeks if not months with 'blow you away' 1200 Lumen lights before they need a simple AC quick quick connect AC pack charge.

    Just food for thought for you but that is how I do it.
     
  10. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Member

    If power was my thingy, I would have a full blown crotch rocket. But, so long as it gets me down the road at 10-12 mph with good mileage, I am satisfied.

    For last month, my 12v ac 6 watt bottle dynamo appears to be doing it's thing as to charging the 7 amp SLA battery with no problems. It started at 13-13.5 volts and still maintains that voltage. I have read that resulting rectified pulsating direct current, does a better job of charging a battery than a capacitor/regulated direct current.
     
  11. Stoltzee

    Stoltzee Member

    So your using the rectifier between the dynamo and battery?
    I'm like everyone else; I want to know if somethings going to work, or how it works before I start spending. You didn't state how long you've been running with a rectifier, and I'll admit I'm slightly weary of using something from radio shack on a motor vehicle, but I am motivated by both legalities, and the one night I was riding home from work on a long stretch of dark pot hole ridden street not knowing what was in front of me until it was to late.
    I may have just wasted 28 bucks too, and I have to budget this hobby a bit at a time also. I may end up getting the rectifier after all.

    This is what I found.
    https://www.treatland.tv/trail-tech-voltage-regulator-p/trail-tech-regulator.htm
     
  12. Stoltzee

    Stoltzee Member

    Thanks for the tip. I will look into lithium batteries now.
    I wanted something for transportation and durability to and from work, so I went with a steel frame, and a 4 stroke. Yesterday I cruised at 30 mph on a slight upgrade. I have saddlebags for groceries, and I notice the difference in the load. With the EZM tranny I know I'm getting over 125 mpg. Its not as nice as your builds though.
    20130323211346.jpg
     
  13. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Member

    Yes, the rectifier is installed before battery, otherwise would be ac going to battery.


    As stated in post #10: For last month, my 12v ac 6 watt bottle dynamo appears to be doing it's thing as to charging the 7 amp SLA battery with no problems.
     
  14. motorbike-scubaguy

    motorbike-scubaguy New Member

    I solved my problem guys, will post pics as soon as I can.
     
  15. Stoltzee

    Stoltzee Member

    I ordered the 3 dollar rectifier from Radio Shack, thanks.
     
  16. bigoilbob

    bigoilbob Member

    Good find. I use one as well, and it rectifies at least 5 amps at 12-14 volts, and has for over a year. Install it, forget it, and fuss over something else.
     
  17. KCvale

    KCvale Motorized Bicycle Vendor

    Just a note about rectifying AC to DC...

    You turn AC to DC with a DIODE.
    In short a diode only allows current to pass 1 way.
    1 diode in line with AC and you get pulsed DC, with 4 in a 'full rectifier bride' configuration you get continuous DC.

    Now LED stands for Light Emiting DIODE.
    Though there are LED bulbs with 2 diodes each that will light a different color for each polarity the point is these lights are diodes themselves.

    You could hook 4 LED lights direct to the dyno in a bridge configuration and 1/2 the lights would get full power all the time.
     
  18. bigoilbob

    bigoilbob Member

    KC, you are obviously right about AC/DC conversion. But that's all the RS rectifier is. Just diodes connected for full wave rectification. For $3 RS relieved me of the inconvenience of making those connections - and in my case perhaps mis-wiring. FYI to all, you want a full wave rectifier or your alternator will only be working half of the time.
     
  19. KCvale

    KCvale Motorized Bicycle Vendor

    Exactly, one cheap little package with the 4 diodes in it with two ~ AC inputs and a + and - output, perfect for most applications.

    My point was more for do-it-yourselfer's rigging their own LED's making it clear that the lights themselves are diodes and configured in a bridge work just dandy.
     
Loading...