Look, a hole in my tank.

Discussion in 'Frame Mounted Engines' started by brian h, Nov 9, 2009.

  1. brian h

    brian h New Member

    I was installing my new fuel petcock when, what should I find? A hole in my fuel tank. you can see it in the picture below. So, whats the best solution? Is this braised or welded.Looks like a crappy job either way. I am gonna fix this, time to start learning a new skill!!! ALso, my supplied shut off valve only stopped the fuel flow while in the half way open position. It was letting fuel through full open and full closed.

    CHECK YOUR TANK!
     

    Attached Files:


  2. TOTAL CARNAGE

    TOTAL CARNAGE Member

    I had a leak in the same place but it started about a week after my build.
    I didn't feel like washing out the tank so I bead blasted the area and used J.B. weld and repainted. It's been holding for over a month now.
    If you haven't had fuel in it yet I would clean the area well and braze it.
    I think that's how the valve works.....mine is on when in line with the hose and off when side ways.
     
  3. brian h

    brian h New Member

    i have had fuel in the tank. there must be something to clean/clear it out for repairs. What do i use to braze it. I know how to solder copper pipes, but what do i use for my filler and can i use map gas?

    I will google all of this but I will check back here if you want to leave some info
     
  4. TOTAL CARNAGE

    TOTAL CARNAGE Member

    soap and water will wash it out just fine.
    I use a plain rod and flux but you can also get a rod with flux coating.
    Map gas should get hot enough to braze. Just remember it must be clean just a little dirt or paint and it will not flow out and seal....
     
  5. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    flush the tank really good with soap & water and let it air out for a day or so. remember it's the fumes that will explode.
    The fitting on the tank is brazed. Brazing is pretty much the same as soldering, but you need more heat, and you use brazing rod (which is brass) and it needs flux to stick to the area. you can probably get brazing rod at any auto parts store. get the kind with theflux coating...it makes it a lot easier. Make sure you clean the area very well before you try to braze it back up. Don't get the tank too hot or the metal may warp.
     
  6. Flapdoodle

    Flapdoodle Member

    Hot water and soap is no guarantee of safety. I had a lawnmower tank fly across the garage because there is a small amount of gas left in the seams. Better to fill it with sand after washing it.

    My HT tank had a hole where yours is, but mine was smaller. A hefty soldering iron and 50-50 solder cured it after cleaning the outside with acetone.
     
  7. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    Drain tank and use rag to clear as much gas out of it that you can. Crank up your lawn mower or some other small engine (you can even use a car/truck). Run a hose from the running engine exhaust into your tank. When your tank is warm the fuel will be dead. I have done this to tanks as large as 30 gallons...just takes longer to get warm. Repair as you like...I'd use silver solder or braise it.
    As far as the fuel cutoff.. the fuel is cut off when the wing is perpendicular to the supply lines.
     
  8. brian h

    brian h New Member

    the shutoff i figured out(got a new one anyway). the stock part is ****. it leaked anyways.

    i have decided to just use jb weld on the tank. i would like to solder it but i already have some jb weld in the shed.
     
  9. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    why is it that a lot of people seem to think that j.b. weld is THE fix-all product?
    it's nothing more than an epoxy with the word "weld" in the name.
    Good luck with it...gas will eat jb weld over time.

    well, i'm going to correct myself here.
    it says that jb weld is impervious to gasoline on their website.
    But from personal experience, i have seen jb weld literally melt away after being exposed to gasoline over long periods of time.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2009
  10. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    I agree with you. If whatever you are working on is worth fixing then fix it both correctly and to last. With JB..one day you might (might never too) be down the road and what are you going to do should it decide to let loose?
     
  11. TOTAL CARNAGE

    TOTAL CARNAGE Member

    I NEVER said J.B.Weld was a fix all anything. I KNOW exactly what J.B.Weld is.
    I have been doing this stuff for a long time and know what stuff will and won't do. I also laugh at some of the stupid things people try to fix with the stuff.
    I would not have given someone information unless I have done it and know that it works. I have a 58 sportster that was repaired at least 15 years ago.
    More than a few big rig tanks repaired where the aluminum tank corrodes under the steel strap...and my current MB that had the same exact hole and all are still holding fuel.
    I don't pull info out of my a s and don't take the time to type if I'm not sure of what I'm talking about.....
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2009
  12. TOTAL CARNAGE

    TOTAL CARNAGE Member

    I'm kind of sorry for that little rant but come on people.
    I'm a reader, not a typer....I search and search for an answer to a problem. When I just can't find it I ask......And I get DO A SEARCH DUDE......
    THEN some one asks "Which end of a screwdriver do I hold onto?"and gets three pages of replies !!!!!!!!
    I try to be helpful and share some of the knowledge I have acquired and I get noooo you're wrong..........
     
  13. brian h

    brian h New Member

    Well, if I should someday be putt putting along and my tank starts leaking. then I guess I will have to bust out my cell phone and call my wife to pick my a** up.

    Look at it like this. it has been done with jb weld and there is no going back, so lets see how this experiment works out. I will take one for the team if I have to. no biggie.

    here is the completed repair.


    Thanks All
     

    Attached Files:

  14. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    I never said that you think jb weld is the fix all product. I am just stating that because it always seems like when someone breaks something, the first thing that gets said is "use jb weld".
     
  15. Solder, leaded solder, or pure lead will work. The hole is small and soldering to the brass braise is no different then soldering to copper. Just make sure it is absolutely clean, paint free, well fluxed, and no fuel remains in the tank. Personally I'd use Dawn soap and water to clean the tank, shaking it well with the soap and water mix inside, rinse it well several times with water, drain thoroughly, dry as well as possible, then wash it out with alcohol or acetone, available in any drug, hardware, or paint store, shake well completely coating the interior, drain completely, and let it dry in a very warm area for a day or two, make sure to blow any fumes out of the tank before applying any heat. The alcohol or acetone will combine with any water, gas, oil, etc, leaving a very clean tank and evaporate away more quickly(it is important to do this in a well ventilated area away from any open flames, heat sources, etc). If you are in a hurry, once the alcohol or acetone seems thoroughly dry, heat the tank with a hair dryer for an hour or so. Slightly larger holes can be fixed with a cleaned, fluxed, unplated brass or steel sheet metal screw driven into the hole and then solder around the screw. You can solder plain steel by cleaning it well, fluxing, and tinning the surface with lead or 50/50 solder. Other solders than lead will work, but lead or 50/50 lead-tin solder is just so much easier to work with. If the tank explodes, don't blame me. It means you didn't clean, dry, and blow out any fumes in the the tank well enough. :-O
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2009
  16. MikeJ

    MikeJ Member

    Getting fumes out of a tank.... I learned from professional welders a long time ago that most of them will not put a flame to a tank if it held anything potentially explosive. But they would after the tank was completely filled with water to overflowing. That forces volatile fuels out of the tank; the fuels would all float on the water surface and out into the street. After emptying the tank, they would start welding. No need to wait until dried out; the heat will make the drying process happen.
     
  17. Danny3xd

    Danny3xd Member

    How is it holding up Brian?
     
  18. brian h

    brian h New Member

    I let the repair sit for about 24 hrs. I have the tank on now with the new shut off from SBP and so far so good. I went down to the beach today on the bike sat at the tiki bar and had a beer. I rode it home and still no leaks. I will let you know if things change.

    Dont drink and bike.

    Do as I say not as I do.
     
  19. Danny3xd

    Danny3xd Member

    LOL Brian. My MBs often ask to go get a cold one. Have a very old bar right around the corner. Lots of tourists happen past. I really, really enjoy watching the reactions. Some times they come inside and ask who owns it. Always the usual questions. "Did you build it, where can I get one, speed and mileage?" But watching them look is a joy. Hehe, folks in the bar ask if you can get a DUI on one (YES!, can get one on a horse, lawnmower, bicycle or any thing. If you are on their road, you are subject)

    Glad to hear your repair is working! Great info, thanks
     
  20. Turtle Tedd

    Turtle Tedd Member

    Read This Again

    Everyone should read this above post ...JB WELD does not weld anything...period...as a welder I have seen this stuff used on everything that should have been welded in the first place...if it gets into a seem or joint and you cant clean it out, . its pretty hard to weld over it.....and yes gasoline will eat it up, quickly.
     
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