Sprockets Mounting the sprocket on the back tire.

Discussion in 'Transmission / Drivetrain' started by Muckem, Aug 1, 2008.

  1. Muckem

    Muckem Guest

    Is there a trick for getting the sprocket centered on the back tire? I just got a new bike and a new engine kit. The got the 80 CC I guess it is from fle bay.
     

  2. HI,

    To help keep my sprocket centered as I torqued the bolts in criss cross fashion, I wedge cut down paper clips between the center of the sprocket and the hub of the wheel....That way the sprocket won't shift as I tighten the bolts...You can use other things than paper clips but it is what I had handy and it seemed to fill the gap and center the sprocket pretty well (I left the small metal pieces in even after I tightened the bolts....just used an end nipper to cut them flush with the sprocket face....I could have taken needle nose pliers and tried to take them out but they are tight and I figure they will help keep the sprocket relatively well centered (the thought has entered my mind that if a piece fell out it could puncture a tire but they haven't gone anywhere yet.
    Hope this helps you.

    Andrew
     
  3. Muckem

    Muckem Guest

    Thanks Andrew

    This worked good.....
     
  4. softride

    softride Member

    for the future

    Just for future reference and to make it easier never mount the sprocket on the rear tire you keep getting flats and the gearing goes to pieces keep them sprockets on the wheel

    sorry just joking feeling happy tonight
    Royz
    :grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin:
     
  5. pedalpower

    pedalpower Member

    glad it worked. I true and remove rollout with the sprocket mounted semi-seated into the washers. I tension up the chain and lightly tap on the rear of the sprocket where it is tight until the tension is the same all around. the chain keeps the sprocket flat while complete the tightening process. I've got it within a milimeter and doesn't wobble at all. have fun, jon
     
  6. I stick my finger in the gap and spin my wheel. It it tightens down just a little,I loosen and tap. Then I use a box wrench on the inside and a drill that has reverse with a 3/8 drive adapter with the right socket on the other end. The drill speeds the constant loosen and tighten. Last time I did this it took an hour. It could have taken 10 minutes but I wasn't satisfied. My sprocket is so true my chain doesn't tighten up.
    I'm hearing another trick is to half tighten your sprocket and install the chain. Then spin the wheel squeezing the chain when it gets tight then bring the wheel back some more. When the chain don't tighten up again tighten the nuts all the way.
    Personally I think this is too much work.
    I'll keep to what I do.
     
Loading...