Mundo utility bike / Staton Honda gxh50 nuvinci ???

Discussion in 'Rack Mounted Engines' started by Tylden, Jul 12, 2008.

  1. Tylden

    Tylden New Member

    I've got a Staton Inc rack mount kit on the way (Honda gxh50, gear box, 26" wheel with the NuVinci hub). I planned on putting on my Raleigh Retro Glide 7 cruiser, but learned the Nuvinci hub (even with the tortion bars) doesn't play nice with aluminum frames. So....back to the bike search again. I did come across the Yuba Mundo utility bike and it looks like a great candidate for what I need. (fun ride, grocery hauler, versatile errand running bike) I'm not sure about the dropouts on this bike or the mounting legistics though.....anyone have any thoughts or opinions ? Is this set up doable ?? You can check out the bike at www.yubaride.com
     

  2. ocscully

    ocscully Member

    I agree a very interesting bike. BUT You will lose most of its cargo/rack space with the installation of the motor and gearbox. I'm assuming the optimal place to mount the motor and gearbow will be directly above the center of the wheel and that puts it right in the middle of that beautiful cargo rack? I suppose you could move it to one end or the other and angle the drive chain forward or back and maintain some rack space for cargo. Maybe the loss of the top rack isn't a problem for you since you will still have the side platforms available?

    ocscully
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2008
  3. Tylden

    Tylden New Member

    I was hoping to mount the motor and gearbox forward of center just behind the seat IF it will work properly like this. If not, well it still has the ability to carry a good load on the side boards and keep the load down low. I think there may still be room for a milk crate or something on top even if it is mounted in the center ? It is kind of a homely looking bike but pretty cool nonetheless. I was also thinking about still being able to pedal with the motor off through crowded pedestrian areas or if I broke down which this bike is designed to do (hills won't be fun lol)
     
  4. duivendyk

    duivendyk Guest

    I have not heard anything about properly installed NV hubs playing havoc with aluminum frames.I have one with such a frame,no problems.The NV is a bear to install but that has nothing to do with the frame as such.Having horizontal dropouts certainly makes chain adjustment a lot easier.Steel frames are no doubt stronger,so you could possibly dispense with the torque reaction bars.At lowest speed the torque reaction from the rear axle, transmitted to the frame via the dropouts can be close to the total input torque to the hub!!
     
  5. Tylden

    Tylden New Member

    Thanks Duivendyk....it's funny, I just re-read the post I was talking about and it was your post lol, "Installing the NuVinci hub...things to watch out for". I'm a little clearer now that I read it again. The tortion bars seems to address this problem with aluminum dropouts. The dropouts on the Raleigh RetroGlide 7 frame point downward at a slight angle but nothing like the straight vertical dropouts on my mountain bike. I may be okay with this bike...I guess I just need to wait until the Staton kit gets here and see. I do like the prospects of the Mundo utility bikes though....a bit pricey, but would make a fantastic grocery hauler, and perhaps a better configuration for peddling without the motor running. If the Raleigh works out I'll probably just save some money and go with a bike trailer to haul things when needed.
     
  6. duivendyk

    duivendyk Guest

    I had one **** of a time with these infernal torsion bars,you need to bend the **** things 180 degrees it's 1/8 " steel.Get in touch with SirJakesus? he heated them up to bend them.I cut them in two and fashioned some aluminum blocks to fit them,worked OK but a lot of fiddling around.Read my other post about axial clearances,a sneaky gotcha for the unwary.
     
  7. Tylden

    Tylden New Member

    Hmmm....oh boy, I can't wait ! LOL Actually I was thinking of using an acetalyne torch to heat them too. Fortunately at work we have plenty of stock steel to work with as well as the necessary tools/equipment ....might be easier to just fabricate a one piece tortion bar for each side. I see it as one of those things you just don't know until you get into it. Now, if only the guys in the shop knew how to fabricate custom fuel tanks :D
    I appreciate the heads up on the axial clearances as well.....oh well, it wouldn't be a true project without a few curve balls would it ?
     
  8. duivendyk

    duivendyk Guest

    The one good thing about that Staton jewel is that it has impressive fit on the hub flats.When I retired I lost my acolites and model shop facilities,quite a comedown.
     
  9. SirJakesus

    SirJakesus Guest

    Yeah I heated the torsion straps with a propane torch while it was on my bench vise and bent the sucker a little bit at a time. Acetalyne is going to be a lot hotter and make the job easier for you. I would suggest using the side with the pre-drilled hole as the "top" of the torsion bar where it'll bolt around the frame. It's just time consuming more than anything and was probably the piece of the kit that took me the longest. That stuff is tight though the hub isn't moving anywhere. It's going to be an amazing ride with the honda 50 engine im sure you won't be disappointed.
     
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