Carby my carb won't fit!!!

Discussion in '2-Stroke Engines' started by danmarjon, Sep 14, 2011.

  1. danmarjon

    danmarjon Member

    very tight spaces on this bike, but I've got to make it work. wondering if I could put a 45 deg. elbow on the carb. tube to offset it just to the outside of the frame. has anyone done this?
     

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  2. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    yes, you can buy an offset intake manifold which is shaped like a Z.
    there is a place on line that sells them called jnmotors.
    you might also be able to get a billet aluminum intake, which is shorter than the stock one, but i have no idea what the actual length of it is...might still be too long.
     
  3. danmarjon

    danmarjon Member

    thanks, I'll look into that, I do not think shortening it will work. what about using copper fittings to make this offset? I think all I need is a 45 elbow and a way to attach it to the carb and manifold. I cant think of any reason this would not work, but I'm not sure
     
  4. heyscuba

    heyscuba New Member

    good luck bro,...
     
  5. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    well, yes you can use the copper fittings but you MUST use acid flux and silver solder to connect it to the intake tube to get a 100% seal.
    if you have ANY air leaks, it will make your engine run too lean (and like ****).
    It can work if it's done right....but you want 0 air leaks and a perfect seal at all joints.
     
  6. justinsidethegates

    justinsidethegates New Member

    ^he's right about the air leaks but short of soldering you could use 5/8" hose to connect the carb to the a copper 45 street elbow and 1/2" to connect to the intake. Lowes had that elbow for me while home depot didnt. the 1/2" is a very tight fit but is doable. 4 1/2" hose clamps and ur good. It needs to be the street elbow to fit one end over the carb.
    Or you can run a 2" piece of 1/2" of hose that allows it to bend slightly sideways and rest against the seat tube or long enough to get the carb just past it.
    Also the short intake does work if you want to buy it. it brings it towards the engine a bit and drops it about an inch.

    My first bike(recently sold) was a Raleigh M-80 that was a tighter fit from the top bar and about the same from the seat tube. I simply disassembled the intake so it had the plastic circle thing over the filter and the 2 bolts through it to hold it to the intake but not tightly so it can breathe. The bolts would rattle out so i also put a hitch pin on each one to secure them. Great if you want to just get it up and running while you think about the way you want to go with the carb to intake adapter...
    Good luck on you build and dont forget to load pics when done.
     
  7. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    well yeah you could do it that way with hose and clamps, but personally i don't think it would look as good done that way. and it may not last very long. The carb can and will vibrate back & forth with a peice of hose connecting it to the intake. trhis can cause issues with the float, needle and seat in the carb.
    Plus the weight of the carb will always be pulling down on the rubber hose.
    The hose can and will deteriorate over time because of constant contact with gasoline.
    If it were me, i woudl either buy an offset intake that is all one peice (less chance of an air leak
    ) or i would solder or weld my own intake tube together out of sopper tubing, or steel.
    But, that's just me.
    I'm all about how things loo as well as how they function and i think it looks bad when you see an intake tube or other parts that look all cobbled together with hose clamps and rubber tubing.
     
  8. danmarjon

    danmarjon Member

    well, at least I know I have some options, so I can continue with this thing. Here is what I am planning to do, once I get this soldered I'll paint it silver to match, I'll put a few slices in the reducer and add a hose clamp to the existing intake tube with some Teflon tape. I may have to put some type of hanger to help support it. Ill let you know how it turns out
     

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  9. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    that looks like it'll work.
    try to get the float bowl as level as possible. (vertically and horizontally). If it's at too much of an angle, it could cause the carb to run out of gas too soon or flood over.
     
  10. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    Carb fit

    Motorpsycho is right. Acid flux and silver solder. I tried regular solder and the vibration tore it apart. And get the carb leveled out. But it looks what you've got going should work just fine.
    Big Red.
     
  11. danmarjon

    danmarjon Member

    well, I put the carburetor issue on hold until I get someone to silver solder it for me, thanks for your help on that, but now am coming up with a few more issues, first my kit did not come with any kill switch, I thought I read somewhere that the new kits do not need one as the throttle will kill the engine. Is this correct? If so, how does this work? The other problem is I seem to have lost the instructions to this, haven't even looked at em. not sure if that would have explained the kill switch issue
    also would it be advisable to tap some bolts into the frame to hold the tension bar in place? I don't want to take any chances of that coming loose
    I'll post more pics when I done
     

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  12. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    Kill Switch

    No button on the throttle housing? I've seen a few without kill switches but not many. You can just buy a momentarily on switch (horn button type) and put it where you can reach it easily in an emergency.
    I don't recommend drilling you frame. Take a look at the SHORT idler arm tensioner. It comes with four clamp bolts instead of two. And being shorter it takes more leverage to move it. It should work better and make you feel better about the strenght of the thing.
    Big Red.
     
  13. danmarjon

    danmarjon Member

    no button, so I guess the third wire (white) would be the kill wire? so I should either isolate this or run it through a switch to ground. thanks for your help. gettin ready to fire this mug up! I have not removed the head yet, should I for any reason?
     
  14. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    White wire

    NO. Just cap off the white wire. Using it can shorten the life of the electrical system. You don't have to take just my word on this, ask almost anyone on this site. Simply hook one wire,NOT the white, to the blue wire comming from your engine. The other wire, NOT the white, To a ground on the engine or frame. The manufacturer of these engines HOPE you break it and have to buy a new one, or at least parts. Don't fall for it. CAP OFF THE WHITE WIRE. If you want, you can TRY using the WHITE wire to run a small light, although this hardly ever works very well. It pulls too much power from the electrics needed for the engine. EVERYONE will tell you to cap it off.
    Big Red.
     
  15. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    Head

    On a new engine there is no reason to remove the head unless you're doing an upgrade.
    Big Red.
     
  16. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    no do not drill and tap the frame....it will crack.
    the only way an engine will shut off by the throttle is if the idle is turned down too low.
    you should have a kill switch or button just in case.
    do not hook the white wire to anything. Cap it off so there are no bare wires at the end.
     
  17. adrian101

    adrian101 Member

    Electrical tape works well as a cap :D wrap the white wire in electrical tape
     
  18. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    Yeah as long as you don't mind having to replace it when it falls off. (electrical tape). electrical tape works, but it's only for temprary repairs in my opinion.
    Do yourself a big favor and cut off all of the push together wire connectors because they will break or vibrate loose over time.
    Solder all of your wire connections and cover them with heat shrink.
    You can cap off the white wire with heat shrink, and it will stay on the wire until you cut it off.
    I have heard about and seen a lot of engine starting troubles with these 2 strokes, and a lot of the time it comes down to poorly routed wiring, loose or broken connections,and wires hooked up wrong.
    Do it right the first time (solder and heat shrink) and you will not have to worry about the wires coming loose or breaking at a connection.
     
  19. HeadSmess

    HeadSmess Well-Known Member

    "GRRRRR! whats that ANNOYING little COUGH i get at 75 km?"

    :eek: oops. ignition wire melting to the uber hot exhaust :eek:

    stupid lack of nylon zip ties at the critical moments! :shout:

    yes...take note of that " most faults come down to poorly routed wiring..." :p

    and also note that when your digital speedo says youre doing 90 and you most obviously arent, its mounted too close to the coil...

    it also makes LED flashlights turn on if you hold em close :eek:
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2011
  20. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    this is why you should replace the stock spark plug wire with a longer, real, resistor spark plug wire and boot.
    then you can re-locate the cdi behind the engine or under it like i did.
    this will keep the spark plug wirte far away from the exhaust because you can route it on the backside of the engine. This will also help you hide the wiring that goes to the cdi for a cleaner look as well.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2011
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