My third build : Doing it right

Discussion in 'Photos & Bicycle Builds' started by cmb271, May 30, 2016.

  1. cmb271

    cmb271 Member

    My previous motorized bicycle builds where poorly thought out and built but due to some circumstances I'm currently facing I've decided to renew my interest into motorized bicycles since I'm 100% positive my car insurance company hates my guts and plans to drop me the moment they can (I was in a car accident and have been without personal transportation for two months and have been using family to get to work).

    I've decided to build a 2 stroke, the simplicity of the 2 stroke engine on top of it's customization abilities and it's curb appeal have made it my choice (and I can't go back on it since I've already ordered and received the kit). The bike I'm going to use is going to be a (and don't hate me for this because right now I have to watch my money) a Kent Bayside 2600 7 speed bike (I know I should avoid walmart bikes but it's readily available and it's really nice looking). I'm going to pack the bearings with automotive grease to prevent early failure.

    I have a 49cc engine kit already and I'm going to replace all the hardware in the engine with this. I'm also going to replace the mounting bolts because that's what snapped on my first one. I'm considering a CNC milled sprocket and adapter instead of the bolt on sprocket that came with the kit but I need feedback on if it's worth the money. I have a speedometer and a basic bicycle light kit but I'm going to replace the rear light with one with turn signal capabilities.

    I had another issue where my old chain tensioner fell into my spokes and ruined a perfectly good rim so after I tune the tensioner to the right location I'll mark it and drill a hole in the center of the tube the chain tensioner will be attached to and bolt it on.

    I'm going to carry around a tool kit as well that'll fit the bolts, screws and nuts on the engine and bike, I need feedback on how to improve the bike beyond what I've already mentioned because I plan to be riding around 22 miles per day (44 miles round trip) in the Georgia summer heat (90-100 degrees) and I don't need break downs on side of rural roads that I have to travel on (I have to commute to a different city and can't take the highway obviously). I need suggestions for reliability for long rides in the heat, security suggestions because I might stay a few nights at a friends house who lives in the city I work in and they live in a bad neighborhood (I'm thinking of buying multiple locks and a tarp to cover it so no one sees the bike besides when I ride in), better light suggestions because I maybe driving in pitch black darkness since I sometimes get off work at 11 at night.
     

  2. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    Regarding the chain tensioner, many here have used old bike tire tubes and wrapped that around the bike bar and had no problems. I double nut the chain tensioner with friction nuts and haven't had any problems. I think if u really wanted to make it reliable you would get a torque wrench to apply the right torque to the nuts instead of feeling it out. The two places that really need frequent checking and adjustment are the engine head bolts (due to heat, wear) and rear engine mount bolts (sustains most torque stress). If you keep these two guys well managed I think you will have a reliable bike. Others can chime in for frequency of checking.

    For lights you want at least 300 lumens and you can buy rechargable kits for like $15 of off ebay for 300+ lumens. Keep two, one 300+ lumens and another just a cheap LED just incase the 300+ lumens fail. For security, get kyprotonite ulock they have an economic model for $13 and a security wire to loop the front tire. The best is to just keep it inside your work or your friends place. tbh, you might also want to carry one of those bright neon reflective vest if you are planning to ride late at night. i mean its dangerous enough already so the vest will help cars see u from the front and behind.

    For upgrades, do it peace meal. one at a time to test if it works or to fix problems. many upgrades at once and problems = headache.

    If you are to keep it out for extended periods outside, you probably want to get a cover incase it rains. this sh*t will rust up like hell.

    clean and oil the chain every 200 miles or so.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2016
  3. cmb271

    cmb271 Member

    When the tensioner failed it did have a bicycle tire wrapped around the tube. I'm going to glue cut up bike tires to the walls of the tensioner bracket for more security but I feel like finding the sweet spot and bolting or gluing it in place. I'll look into the lights, thanks for the tip.
     
  4. cmb271

    cmb271 Member

    Update, I bought the Kent and the bottom tube was to big for the 49cc engine mounts, I want a cruiser frame because of their ability to handle the weight and torque but I can't stand coaster brakes because I always mess up the bearings when I repack them. Based on previous experience free wheels are less likely to seize up based on the fact that I've gone through three rear coaster tires (for bearing failure and one where my tensioner hit the spokes), but the front freewheel tire is still the original. what's your opinion(s) I put handlebar brakes and changed the back coaster tire to a free wheel and just used a (run, jump on, pop the clutch) or pull start kit because I honestly cant find a decent bicycle under 150 that'll work with this engine. Sorry for any errors, I typed this at work on my phone
     
  5. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    i doesnt fit with the original mounts? did u buy the universal u-bolt mount adaptor? that should fit bigger tube bikes, which tbh are most bikes in the USA. if you can afford it get a cnc hub adaptor to mount the rear sprocket; it will save on tires and bearings.
     
  6. cmb271

    cmb271 Member

    I have a heavy duty universal mount on the way but how exactly does it work because the engine mounts won't clear the frame so how would it help, a picture would help show me how it'll work
     
  7. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

  8. cmb271

    cmb271 Member

    I feel silly now that I didn't wait for the Universal mount to arrive before I took the bike back, I might be-able to buy it again now that I was able to pull the motor mounts out but I won't do it till I get the universal mount mounting on the engine and new mounting bolts for the rear portion in the mail.
     
  9. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    take it slow and learn from your prior missteps and you be fine. and. ask forum questions if you have any. :)
     
  10. cmb271

    cmb271 Member

    Considering this is suppose to be my daily rider, I'm definately going to try and do it right, and doing it right involves asking question.
     
  11. cmb271

    cmb271 Member

    I repurchased the old bike, they just put it back on the shelf, still had the tiny scratch it had when I first tried fitting the engine, the heavy duty universal motor mount has been attached to the engine with loc-tite blue, when the motor mounts come I'll seal them with loc-tite red for the heat. I plan to attach the lights, pack the wheel bearings with SuperTech multi-duty complex hi-temp grease, start adding rubber padding to the engine mounts and wheel tensioner and bolt on the gear. When the engine's hardened nuts and bolts come ill seal them in with loc-tite blue.
     
  12. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    i think most folks here will agree to not add rubber padding to the engine mounts because it simply provides an almost guarantee opportunity for your engine to find more space to vibrate. even if it is on there, the motor vibrations will shred it to bits. you want ideally a flush and tight mount. wolfshoes showed a custom additional wood mount to secure more of the motor than two areas but that is pretty advance.

    here is my list of key items:

    - replace rag joint sprocket with hub adapter sprocket
    - replace rear engine mount bolts with high grade steel bolts (most expensive and high grade possible)
    - configure rear wheel sprocket and drive sprocket to have perfect alignment while wheel is turning
    - check engine bolts and rear engine mount bolts for correct torque periodically (not sure how to do this without a torque wrench)
    - have good brakes (LOL)
     
  13. Dustmonkey

    Dustmonkey New Member

  14. cmb271

    cmb271 Member

    Update: I have the engine put back together after JB-welding the engine head studs, I attached the new engine mounts and sub-mounted it to the frame, I attempted to mount the new 0.8 gallon fuel tank to find my mounts are to small for the frame and the larger studs on the fuel tank so I just ordered bigger mounts. I also bit the bullet knowing I hate the rag joint and ordered a 40 tooth hub adapter sprocket. I have the speedometer and lights hooked up, I need to reroute the brakes to a single handle lever, pack the wheel bearings which I plan to do when I get off work tonight.
     
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