Need lots of help on a 1951 Schwinn.

Discussion in 'Antique Motorized Bicycles' started by mikesova, Sep 15, 2008.

  1. mikesova

    mikesova Member

    I recently attained this old Schwinn from my grandpa. He got it brand new at his dad's Hardware store (that our family still owns) when he was 12. That puts the bike at about a 1951. First I would like to tune it up a bit. The chain is really loose so i might need to remove a link or 3. Where can I get replacement bearings for the wheels and maybe a replacement bearing for where the handle bars swivel? I think I'm going to tear it apart and repaint it. I'm thinking either olive drab/black or flat black w/ red wheels. I'd like to get some smooth tires for it with white walls.

    As far as a motor goes, what one would be the best/biggest set-up for this bike. I think I would like a chain drive. Is there a big difference between the engine kits available online or are they basically the same? Sorry if these are super newb questions, but I have no idea where to start. It just seems like a neat project to work on. thanks.

    Oh, I'd also like to build a side car out of conduit to haul my kayak on. Has anybody on here built sidecars to haul stuff?

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    P.S. if anybody has any info about what this model is, I'd be curious to hear it. thanks again.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2008

  2. JemmaUK

    JemmaUK Guest

    Re the motor - biggest displacement would likely be the 138cc whizzer motor..

    Kit set up for CIF engine would be 80cc (67cc volumetric) with SBP shifter kit - although in that case you'd need to fit up a derailler/cassette and the relevant rear wheel..

    GEBE or Staton rack mounts - largest would be either a 40 or a 47 cc two stroke... most powerful would be the DDM 4.25hp 30CC motor which will fit both..

    Hope that helped

    Jemma xx
     
  3. terrence

    terrence Member

    My opion only. If its a family heirloom dont wreck it with a HT engine. Remove the rear
    fender and put a 40cc 2 stroke rear mount that you can replace the fender and make it
    like it was when it came from the store. There are plenty of old crusers out there that
    Don't mean anything to you. You may be sorry 10 years from now. :grin:
     
  4. JemmaUK

    JemmaUK Guest

    Not a bad idea actually - although it would be an idea to try and find the original paint details and fully restore the bike to its original configuration if you are going to go that route..

    Jemma xx
     
  5. JemmaUK

    JemmaUK Guest

    You might be able to find model details/sale price and date from the records at the store if they have been kept... this could be a great restoration project with all the information you have available.

    Your grandfather may likely remember the model name of the bike as well - and with that you can search sites online...

    www.oldroads.com
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 15, 2008
  6. mikesova

    mikesova Member

    I wouldn't call it an heirloom, but it does hold some sentimental value. My grandpa had repainted it, there are no badges, the fenders are dinged up. I want to clean it up, but I want to customize it...not restore. I don't want to do a lot of hacking things up. What engine do I want with the least hacking? I want the one that mounts below the rider, like a motorcycle, not the one that mounts above the rear wheel.
     
  7. terrence

    terrence Member

  8. mikesova

    mikesova Member

  9. Esteban

    Esteban Active Member

    I like old Scwinn bikes & it makes me " shivvvvver " when I hear of someone wanting to " hack " [ same as " butcher" it ] That is a nice bike from a good year. Keep it & hack another.
    Schwinn dates=http://www.bunchobikes.com/serialnumber3.htm
     
  10. mikesova

    mikesova Member

    to put the engine on, is there any hacking involved? I though it was just a bolt on kit? I was planning on replacing some bearings, painting it, putting new tires on, maybe a stronger chain, and bolting on the engine kit. Am I cuckoo?

    Also, I'm looking at engines from http://www.bluecollarbike.com/blclbob_002.htm He has the 49 cc and the 71 cc. In Michigan, to lisence it as a moped it has to be 50 cc or less. What kind of legality issues have people run into with these? Also what kind of speeds could be reached with a 230 lb guy? :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2008
  11. Esteban

    Esteban Active Member

    In my honest opinion, adding a motor to a vintage/antique bike, is hacking. Especially doing this to such a good bike ! Many Schwinns are highly desrireable !! $$$ You said that you also wanted to customize it, too. The wear & tear of a HT bike motor to any bike is damaging. " EASY Bolt-on kits ?" If you think that is what the HT kits are,, you need to read more. If you absolutely must put a motor on it, I suggest what " Terrence " said, above. A rear friction drive kit would be a better && easier installation choice & it can be reverted back to original. Read a little here, & get more info about your bike.
    http://www.schwinnbike.com/usa/eng/forums/index.php
     
  12. Rain City

    Rain City Member

    If you do decide to put any motor on it, make sure you put some good brakes on it (something in addition to the coaster).
     
  13. mikesova

    mikesova Member

    Also, the rims aren't original or the seat. I would consider this a resto-mod project.

    I have most of the paint stripped from the frame tonight. I need some new bearings for where the fork pivots. I don't know how they size them, would I be best off just taking the frame to a bike shop and find some that fit, or is there a specific size I need?

    thanks for the help everybody, this will be a fun project.

    P.S. if somebody wants to send me 500$ and rescue the bike from me... feel free. :grin:

    but seriously, I think Grandpa will think it's neat.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2008
  14. mikesova

    mikesova Member

    [​IMG]

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    it's currently a pile of parts now. I stripped most of the paint from the frame last night. I need new fork bearings and wheel bearings. I will probably prime the frame and fork this week. This is fun.
     
  15. mikesova

    mikesova Member

  16. Esteban

    Esteban Active Member

    To help you get the right parts, info, & everything else to get this bike in top shape,,,, go to the link I supplied above.
     
  17. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    new bearings -- yes - just to make sure you get the right size - first time

    a fast trip to the old bicycle shop would be in order

    I understand that many here on site -- order many parts through internet

    if the same parts can be had fast at a bicycle shop -- seems the place to go

    Ride That Thing - Mountainman
     
  18. mikesova

    mikesova Member

    did some priming.


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  19. HoughMade

    HoughMade Guest

    My man, I say go for it. There are some truly valuable old bikes out there, but to tell the truth, most old bikes are just old bikes. There are plenty of 50+ year old bikes that were used for what they were supposed to be used for- bikes. Those bikes have wear and tear- like something 50+ years old has when you use it as intended. These bikes have a market value possibly equal to a new cruiser down at Walmart (face it- unless it's both rare and pristine- a sign of regretful non-use, it's not worth any significant money).

    Add to that that parts are replaced over time- which they should be when a bike is used, and any collector value is long-since gone. I say that to say this- use it the way you want to use it. Restore it the way you want to restore it. Put the engine on it you want to put on it. Something like your bike has far more value by virtue of providing a hobby and transportation to you than it has just sitting around in its current state. Seems to me your grandfather and great-grandfather would get a hoot out of it being used and enjoyed, mine would.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 19, 2008
  20. mikesova

    mikesova Member

    Sounds good.
     
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