Noob builds hybrid 49cc gas+ 2000 watt electric Felt MP. I tried my best.

Discussion in 'Photos & Bicycle Builds' started by miked826, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. miked826

    miked826 New Member

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    This bike is a project/ordeal I started about 6 months ago. Originally a 2012 Felt MP beach cruiser , this bike had the gas motor installed and a few months later the electric hub was installed. Bike is capable of operating by pedal, gas or electric or all three at once. The electric hub provides the torque and the gas motor provides the top end speed. A 50 tooth rear sprocket gives the gas motor a top speed of 35-40mph with a 200 pound man in the seat on level terrain. Top speed for the electric hub alone is 25-30mph. When both motors are used simultaneously, it is capable of climbing the steepest hills without pedaling and able to pull away from a dead stop at car speeds. I wish the gas engine fully recharged the batteries on the fly but it does not. It does, with brake regen and gas motor running, extend their range by over 300%.

    Bike:
    2012 Felt MP

    Motors:
    Huasheng 49cc 4-Stroke C.A.R.B. Approved
    Crystalyte HS3540 Direct-Drive Hub

    Clutch:
    Fully Automatic Centrifugal EZM Q-Matic

    Batteries:
    AllCell - Lithium Nickel Manganese Cobalt 48V 12.9Ah (Housed in right hand ammo can)
    Phantom - Lithium Ion 12V 14Ah (Housed above front fork)

    Controller:
    Crystalyte 40A 12 Mosfet Sensorless (2000 Watt)

    Front Brake:
    Tektro - Auriga E-Comp Caliper (hydraulic)
    Tektro - Hard Ceramic Brake Pads
    Shimano - Ice Tech Front Disk (203mm)

    Rear Brake:
    Crystalyte (internal electric, voltage regenerative)

    Front 3 Speed Derailleur:
    Shimano 105

    Tires:
    Geax - 24" x 2.3" Tattoo Rigid

    Lights:
    Rear Dual PDW - Danger Zone
    Front 20 Watt CREE LED light mounted inside a Hella 500 light housing

    Horn:
    Wolo 139 Db 12V Air Horn

    Throttles:
    Electric - Left Hand Thumb Throttle
    Gas - Right Hand Twist Throttle

    Seat:
    Harley Davidson bobber style, genuine leather, motorcycle seat

    Seat Height:
    28" (fixed)

    Battery Range:
    Batteries alone: 25 miles (no pedaling)
    With gas engine running: 75+ miles (no pedaling)

    Fuel Capacity:
    3/4 Gallon

    Weight:
    100-120 pounds (estimated)

    Combined Horsepower:
    4.7 Horsepower (2 Gas + 2.7 Electric)

    Combined Mileage:
    1500 miles

    Top Speed:
    35-40 mph (level terrain, no pedaling)
     
    MotorBicycleRacing likes this.

  2. mainstreet

    mainstreet New Member

    Awesome build!
     
  3. miked826

    miked826 New Member

    Thanks much. It's been through many variations and this is the final version. I think.
     
  4. mainstreet

    mainstreet New Member

    Actually, "awesome build" is an understatement! What you have created is not only a thing of beauty, but an engineering marvel. Your bike is the most beautiful and creative build I have ever seen. I don't know if Jay Leno lives near you, but I can guarantee that if he ever sees your bike, he will pay you anything you ask to own it. WOW!
     
  5. miked826

    miked826 New Member

    Thanks. It was nearly a 6 month ordeal of trial and error to get it to this point as I had no instruction manual or anyone to turn to for this specific hybrid design. All I had was an idea in my head. Luckily it all works right. Jay lives easily within range of this bike from my house and I was thinking about trying to get it on Jay Lenos Garage website.

    I got all kinds of videos of this thing in action on my youtube site as well.

    http://youtube.com/miked826
     
  6. jefuchs

    jefuchs Member

    That's truly amazing. Seems very expensive, though. Did you buy all new?
     
  7. miked826

    miked826 New Member

    It was expensive. $4000 just for the parts that were all new at the time and everything but the bike was bought online from a dozen different websites. Was it worth it? It's just not the same bike with either the electric or gas side being left off. They both need each other for numerous reasons. Pedal, gas and electric are all independent from each other or can all be used at once in any order. It does not matter.
     
  8. miked826

    miked826 New Member

  9. jefuchs

    jefuchs Member

    I see you have it for sale. Are you planning to build another?
     
  10. miked826

    miked826 New Member

    I'm done building hybrid bikes. This is the first and last hybrid bike that I will ever build. It's too expensive, too time consuming, it's not 50-state legal and most importantly you can't ride that bike, with those tires, on a public beach.....even if I removed the gas engine. There is no federal or state law against riding an electric bike on a public. No electric bike currently exists that can effortlessly ride on the beach without having to pedal at some point. The Hanebrink comes close but it looks too much like a mini-bike for my tastes. The next bike I build will be able to hit a street curb head-on at under 10mph and just harmlessly roll right over it. It will have an electric motorcycle engine mounted in the frame rated at 6hp with 19hp peak. I'm done with electric hubs as well. E-hubs work great for what they do on the street but it's just not enough to handle loose California beach sand for an extended distance.
     
  11. miked826

    miked826 New Member

    I can say that I was riding my bike one day and my gas throttle cable broke right in front of a house with a bunch of kids playing in the yard. They all looked at me laughing loudly and one said, "Look at him, his motorbike broke, ha ha!" I shut the gas engine off and they continued to laugh at me. I looked back at them and gave them a sad look, then I floored the e-hubs thumb throttle and rocketed away in near silence. The laughing ceased and their mouths just hung open with nothing coming out of them. That was a priceless moment. I was laughing all the way home. LMAO
     
  12. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    I've got the only bike in the world that uses a shift kit and the rear wheel shifts gears automatically. I built this bike to have the versatility of shifting gears but meet the legal requirement many states have of must have automatic transmission. Other states also state the operator can't shift gears after primary drive is engaged.

    What do you think about this? There's a 14 cc 4 stroke engine used for model planes. Using one of them to power a 48 volt alternator. This mini generator could come on to power a 1500 watt electric bike motor when the battery runs low as well as recharge the battery. Then cut off after the battery is charged. I know a circuit board would have to be made to turn on/off the engine. You could even make the small engine run on propane.

    I think this system would work great with the autoshift shift kit system I've developed. Such a bike should be legal in most states. Would like to hear what you think about it.
     
  13. Stoney

    Stoney Member

    Why don't you stop telling everyone about it and build it! It sounds great! Now shut up and build it!!!
     
  14. miked826

    miked826 New Member


    Personally speaking, any MB with a transmission that is hidden to the common cop eye is ok by me. I could care less if it's technically not legal. I just want to be able to go uphill in traffic at a reasonable and safe speed.

    The model plane engine/alternator idea is an excellent idea. My battery takes 6 hours to recharge and it quickest charge time is 3 hours using a different charger. Because of it's specific Lithium chemistry, it can't recharge any faster than that.

    I can also say that in Los Angeles, where most streets are in 3rd World condition, riding hybrid MB that weighs over 100 lbs. forces me to ride at max pressure in my tires. No big deal for the front tire because of the suspension but the bike tire feels like its made of concrete when I hit any bumps and of course the whole thing then gets airborne with me on it pretty easily. Riding in Los Angeles: Not for the Faint of Heart.
     
  15. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    I like to gather information from others who've made similar builds to avoid expensive mistakes before I build.
     
  16. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    So if three hours is the quickest charge time, the mini generator would have to power the bike for that long before it cuts off. Have you heard of any faster charge systems?
     
  17. miked826

    miked826 New Member


    If you have built an auto shifting bike hub that makes the NuVinci N360 look silly in comparison then you should mass produce that thing. My bike started out with just a gas engine. The electric hub was added later to cope with the hills in Los Angeles. It copes quite well with any hill but it is also a crazy expensive setup for the average Joe like me. I was in shock after I added everything up when I was done building it. I'm still in shock to this day. LOL
     
  18. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    I'm using a Land Rider derailleur. Much less expensive than he Nuvinci 360. Just recently did upgrades to my bike and will be posting pictures and videos soon. I now use a Staton hub and a Rino Lite double wall rim. The Staton shift kit has a 44 t for the engine. I use a Surly stainless steal 34 t chainring to drive a 8 speed DNP 34-11 freewheel. It works great been riding the bike for two years now.
     
  19. miked826

    miked826 New Member

    I didn't have the luxury of gathering information on a "hybrid gas/electric bike" nor did I make any expensive mistakes. I made a few cheap mistakes though but nothing huge.
     
  20. miked826

    miked826 New Member

    The mini generator would only have to run that long if the battery was completely drained at the time it was turned on. They key is to never let the battery reach that level. Lithium Nickel Manganese Cobalt doesn't like quick chargers for some reason. Lithium Ion may be a different story though. Lithium Nickel Manganese Cobalt is the most powerful battery (pound for pound) you can buy at the moment though. Nissan invented that Lithium chemistry for their Nissan Leaf car.
     
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