Old School Eye Candy

Discussion in 'Photos & Bicycle Builds' started by Scootmeister, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    It's been several months since I posted photos and a description of my first build, the "Red Hornet". That bike got mixed reviews, some people just don't appreciate Pee Wee Herman like I do! Anyway, since then I've been putting an insane amount of time in a Chrome Giant Stiletto with a 66cc Chinagirl, a custom springer seat, and custom springer front end. Actually, I should call the bike "Frankenstein" because I scavenged parts from OCCs as well as several other brands. The hard pan seat is fabbed from a heavy aluminum frying pan from my father-in-laws restaurant, the front wheel is an OCC wheel re-laced with ss spokes and converted to disc brake with the 3 inch tire that originally came on the rear of the Stiletto. The rear wheel is a 4.25" OCC wheel with a welded seam and re-laced with 12 gauge ss spokes and converted to disc brake. I also used a sprocket conversion in place of the freewheel. The rear fender is from an OCC, the front from a cruiser. Both chains are upgraded BMX (my chinese 415 chains started cracking). The controls are standard MB, but the cables are heavier scooter cables. The AMF Harley tank came from an old 350 sprint. It lifts from the rear and slides out of rubber mounts just like it was originally designed to do. It's held in place by a heavy rubber O-ring, so it comes off in 30 seconds for maintenance. I tweaked the Chinagirl to squeeze out a little extra power to handle the added weight of this build. Shortly I will add a LED headlight, a horn, and a Whizzer speedometer from my parts bin. The configuration on this bike makes it a blast to ride. I hope you like it.
     

    Attached Files:


  2. james65

    james65 Member

    I didn't see your Red Hornet but this bike is great. I am not a fan of more HP but if I had a bike like that I'd have to do it justice and up the Hp.

    Dam good build both artist & craftsman.
     
  3. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Thanks for your comments, James. I'm glad you like the bike. I took a chance and purchased the Chinagirl engine used on Ebay 5 years ago and it was pretty strong then. It seems like every time I change something it gets a little stronger. The compression is so high it's hard for an old guy like me to start it with a pull start. The free flow muffler which is acutally a standard Briggs and Stratton screw on, makes a big difference over the one that came with the engine which is quiet but restrictive. Anyway, the extra boost compensates for the Stiletto's heavy frame and the weight of the springer front which is made from heavy steel to reduce flex. Some might not care for the bling factor, all the chrome, but I like it because I'm not such a hot painter. Here are some photos of my first build which is totally different from this one.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    wow you have a lot of work in that chopper.
    The look is not what i'd call old school, but that's just my opinion.
    I don't really are for the seat design or those huge springs under it.
    the gas tank is huge on that frame!
    but, that's just my personal opinion.
    I'm not bashing the build at all, just offering my opinion.
    If it were mine i would have done some things different.
    I have a stiletto that i've customized, but it's just a pedal bike.
    I thought about putting an engine in it, but i'm not sure yet.
    Looking at yours, I like what you did for the engine mount. I was trying to come up with an idea that would work, and i see what you did.
    If i motorize mine, i'm going to do what you did with the chains, but i'm going to run the stock 7 speed rear sprocket to make it a shifter.
    I might gut my o.c.c. and pull the engine off of it to go on my stilletto now...lol
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2012
  5. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Hi Psycho. I think I've seen pictures of your Stiletto. Did you do some custom paint work on it? I agree with your comments, but I am not a designer, I'm an assembler!!!! Basically I work with what I have in my parts bin and on the shelf and whatever comes out is the final product (remember, it's not a job, it's an adventure). Sort of the Frankenstein approach to MB building. I fabricated the motor mounts from flat steel and connected them to the frame with 1 1/2" Kuriakyn clamps I got on ebay for a song. They are strong and fit snug. I'll take some closeups of my mounts and post them. In the meantime, I'd urge you to motorize, these frames are a near bullet proof platform and the ride is amazing!!!!!!
     
  6. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    yeah my stilletto has a custom paint job, the original 24 x 3 rear wheel and a 700 c roadbike front wheel.
    I put a stick shifter from a muscle bike on the frame and it comes through a slot in the fake gas tank.
    I put a nice 3.25 inch wide slick tire in the rear and a very low profile road bike tire on the front. I'm using the original seat, and i put on a set of polished aluminnum drag bars, chrome and black grips. and a polished brake lever.
    Mine still has the stock disk brake in the rear and no front brakes at all.
    as a peddle bike, it's fast, but I can only imagine it set up with a 2 stroke and the capabilty to shift.
     
  7. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Configuring a shift arrangement could be a challenge if you use the built in jackshaft. I guess if you use a SBP kit you could bypass the jackshaft. The other solution would be to use a multi-speed hub and eliminate the original Shimano setup. I have a Nexus 3-speed hub on my other MB and it works great, no chain skip or delay in shifting. If you come up with a good solution, let me know. In the meantime I'm gonna just enjoy a slower takeoff and lower high end!
     
  8. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    but why would it be a challenge? use the built in jackshaft (it has sealed bearings already), weld or bolt a sprocket to the left side of the shaft. (you have an extra sprocket on the left side of your built in jack shaft) then use the right side sprocket on the jack shaft to run the chain back to the 7 speed cassette that's already on the rear hub. basically just do exactly what you did with your set up, but run the 7 speed cassette in the rear rather than a single gear like you have.
    by rights it should work just fine, and the original cassette has the mega-range, super low 1st gear for excellent take off torque.

    why do you say "slower take off, and lower high end?
    usually you end up with one or the other...not both.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2012
  9. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    You're right, what was I thinking?
     
  10. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Well-Known Member

    The seat pan fabbed from a skillet is priceless. Well done.
     
  11. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Thanks, Wheelbender. The seat is surprisingly comfy, it's like my hams belong there.
     
  12. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    Just curious, what size sprocket did you put on the left side of the jackshaft?
     
  13. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    It's a 20 tooth sprocket.
     
  14. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Psycho, I should have mentioned that I couldn't find a sprocket to fit the jackshaft and still align with the engine sprocket, so I had to make one from a keyed collar and the housing of a freewheel. It wasn't easy but it worked.
     
  15. dbscrapper

    dbscrapper New Member

    Very very nice build. I can see why the tank needs the quick removal just to get at the sparkplug.

    dbscrapper
     
  16. shawnshank

    shawnshank Member

    You are obviusly a skilled fabricator. Nice job making those random parts work together.
    You need to change the name on that tank to Franken-Davidson :grin5:
     
  17. professor

    professor Active Member

    Great job Scoot. Innovative too!
     
  18. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Hey Wheelbender, just saw your post. I'm glad you like the seat. It's comfy and shines like crazy! Check out my new post, some recent updates that might interest you.
     
  19. birdmannn101

    birdmannn101 Member

    Hey Scootmeister,

    I love that Harley tank. How did you mount the front of the tank? I am thinking about putting a Honda S90 tank on mine which mounts on 2 rubber round things which will probably be connected to a steel bar mounted horizontal to the cross bar.
     
  20. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Hi Bridmann. Yeh, the tank mounts just like it did originally. I made a frame out of aluminum strap and bolted the round rubber mounting thingies to it. The rear of the tank slides down on the rubber holders and the front of the tank slides forward to engage them. So to remove the tank you just remove the heavy rubber o-ring that holds the rear of the tank down, raise the rear of the tank 2 inches or so, slide it rearward 2 inches and it lifts right off. It comes off in about 2 minutes and the CDI and wiring can be hidden in the tank tunnel. Lucky for me, the Stiletto had two threaded holes in the top frame tube perfectly spaced for my aluminum strap frame. How is your Honda tank set up?
     
Loading...