Recession affects on motorized bikes sales

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by jaguar, Mar 23, 2013.

  1. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    This is my take on it: Although in inflationary times the people are in more need than ever to have cheap transportation I don't think sales will increase very much due to the fear factor. When the human animal feels threatened he/she goes into a defense mode that is ultra conservative. They don't want to spend money although such expense may save them money in the long run.
    In my electromedicine business I see that again and again. With every downward step in the economy the people stop buying although a basic electromedicine device can save them many doctor visits.
    If you have any contrary viewpoints based on experience (not far-flung theory) then please share them.
     

  2. Dankoozy

    Dankoozy Member

    I always thought of the MB as a bit of a recessionmobeel. During the Celtic Tiger people here bought 3L jeeps, mercedes with huge engines that people now can't sell but most new cars I see on the road now are Diesel MPV's and small basic cars. There is an increase in new scooters being bought in the Youkay http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16844525 but you just don't see many 2 wheelers in Ireland. Part of the reason for that might be that the road surface is too bad, people think its too dangerous. Most people aren't very technical so the friendly CVT based scooter from a dealer in the city will be the first port of call for people wanting to give up the car (and an ordinary pushbike won't do). There are very few MB in Ireland as a result of the general lack of two wheelers but I'd say it's only going to get more popular even if 90-99% of the people will go for commercially built scooters instead
     
  3. Richard H.

    Richard H. Member

    My dad refurbishes vintage bicycles and builds and sells a few MABs as well. He's always saying if you build the cheapest bikes you get the cheapest customers. His customers are more high end. The recession hits the lower end market the hardest, those more well off are doing okay and don't have a problem paying for quality.
     
  4. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    Pretty cool, I'd love to see some high-end boutique bikes.How about some pics?
     
  5. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    My customers are poor - after they lose their car (or license, or green card) they scrape up enough for a cheap bike to get to work (off-book day jobs). Pretty much the same for the recession-caused newly poor, but perhaps not many here live in a neighborhood where they'd see them.
     
  6. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    I have a nice DB mb with a staton/Honda f/d kit listed for sale locally for $600 and the only bites I get are trades for guns or mmj. People don't realize what these things cost I suppose. Theres a lot of extras on the bike too that add up. New replacement would cost about $900. If someone offered me $500 i'd take it. Don't understand it but its not easy to sell these things. Thought because of tax refund season now would be the time to sell..........could be the economy or poor understanding of all whats involved with a MAB.
     
  7. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Well-Known Member

    The sluggish economy seems to affect sales of electric bikes more. The price of LiPo batteries has steadily declined, but they are still expensive. When viewing endless-sphere.com, it looks like the amount of new e-bike builds has really declined.
     
  8. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    When an electric can go 50 miles on 1 charge and total cost is say $700 for a working bike then i'll consider one. I tend to go on long rides and range is a must.
     
  9. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    Recession is what made me do it, four new tires/insurance/reg or a cost effective bike.I agree Darwin, people don't get it; if I were to sell "Lumpy" it would be at least $1000, and I bought most everything on the bike (including bike) used, as I couldn't afford it otherwise.Most people that ask me about it and price always bring up what it doesn't offer "you sure are going to get cold in the winter, you can get wet, doesn't go very fast,...".It's a discounting before giving it a chance, look at the size of the forum, we are a small part of even the biking community.Most people don't like change and HATE the idea of exercising, then they go on sporadic diets and buy gym memberships they never use, that cost as much as a MAB, silly humans.
     
    Dankoozy likes this.
  10. Dankoozy

    Dankoozy Member

    If supercaps could hold more charge I'd try electric but Lithium just don't last long enough for my liking. The 250W of commercially made ebikes just isn't enough either
     
  11. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    Lithium batts are a step in the right direction being lighter and you can charge anytime. The best I see right now cost about 1200$ to 1800$ and your still limited to 30mi and that's with the wind at your back on flat ground. I would want a 50mi range with some to spare going full blast all the way.
     
  12. Dankoozy

    Dankoozy Member

    This geezer in Ireland who makes MB's claims to be out of stock and that they're selling so well. Probably bluffing though, you just don't see them here. I don't believe that he's really sold that many of them. If I start seeing more of them I might just start making my own friction drive kits and flogging them. Next build I will probably sell on fairly fast anyway because I did have people interested - though maybe not once they hear the price

    http://buzzingbicycles.webs.com/apps/webstore/
     
  13. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    Claims! When I see it i'll be in line. Do you realize the profit potential of 1 bike capable of such claims? Why hasn't a big corp or other investors jumped on board?........$ demands ??s
     
  14. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    50 mile range yet no SLA batts?
     
  15. It would be great if selling motorbikes was popular and profitable, but if they become more popular, so will the laws for them. The government will see it as another tax income. So I say keep them to the people who are interested in em!
     
  16. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Well-Known Member

    I agree that my state, and others are missing out on potential revenue by not registering motorized bicycles.
     
  17. And I would hate to have too!! Hahaha
     
  18. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    I see a lot of bikes sold around town that are back in the ads a few weeks later - some folks get poor these days & think they'll replace a car to get to work daily on one of these - most folks can't keep one running more than a week or so due to lack of tools or skill. I believe this limits the market a lot.
     
  19. Yes, to create a market you would have to create a simple, easy to operate and reliable bike. But even motorcycles with carbs have to be maintained regularly. Like any other vehicle, you either learn to do the repair and maintenance yourself, or pay a specialist to do it for you. Any vehicle requires it.
     
  20. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    getting a tuneup every 6 months or so isn't quite like doing tightening & adjusting before every ride tho
     
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