Replacing the Spark Plug

Discussion in '2-Stroke Engines' started by awc360, May 13, 2010.

  1. awc360

    awc360 New Member

    Is it as easy as unscrewing the old one (when engine is cooled down) and screwing in a new one? Just got my NGK B5HS spark plug from spookytooth for my skyhawk 66cc.
     

  2. (Ian)

    (Ian) Member

    That's what I just did and it worked fine for me :)
     
  3. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    NO not at all. The original plug comes with a screw on top on the plug. To install the original plug you remove the screw top exposing the threads. The replacement plug won't have a screw off top to expose the threads as you see on the original plug. If it should have, remove the screw top. The spark plug boot WILL NOT fit over the replacement plug without a screw top. As far as replaceing the plug itself, yes..off with old on with the new...

    Check out the link below......

    http://www.motoredbikes.com/showthread.php?t=22494&highlight=spark+plug
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2010
  4. Hajuu

    Hajuu Member

    Where do you live that replacement plugs dont come with a screw top?

    Seems pretty weird, they'd save about 5c and make it grossly inconvienient to use them (say, if broken down).. Unless I've misunderstood you..

    But basically, if its tightly screwed in, and the plug fits, and (most importantly) it runs, then obviously you're fine.
     
  5. KCvale

    KCvale Motorized Bicycle Vendor

    Don't forget to gap it.
    .028
     
  6. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    I live in the good ole USA. Have been buying plugs for over twice your years. Go through this link and you WILL see two 2 cycle plugs. One has a threaded top that the cap screws off, the other is not to be removed, if you do you destroy the plug.


    http://www.motoredbikes.com/showthread.php?t=22494&highlight=screw+top
     

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    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  7. thats why i changed the boot
     
  8. awc360

    awc360 New Member

    How do I go about this?
     
  9. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    I can't believe this question. I guess I come from a time that at 21 you have already torn down engines and rebuilt them in a shop or your back yard. My honest opinion about your lack of engine knowledge and these engines don't mix. You really need a engine that is better built and doesn't need tinkering.

    Now for your question. Take the plug and open the distance between the center electrode and the ground electrode to approx .050 this can be done with the tool pictured below. Then lightly tap the ground electrode almost closed (to about .010 to .020) . Now take the gap tool and insert it between the center electrode and the ground electrode at the thinest portion of the tool. Now rotate the tool or the plug until you are at the reading of .028 this will gap the plug to the correct setting. There are many tools that will do this, but this is not only the easiest but cheapest. They can be bought for around a buck at a Auto Zone, Advance, and 100's of other parts stores. Usually around the register as the plugs are behind the counter.

    Sorry I sound so critical, but I came from a different age when boys were taught these things instead of having iPods crammed in their ears. This is where technology has done a disservice to this generation.
     

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    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  10. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

  11. im 15 and i know how to gap a plug
    just make sure you have a feeler gauge
    and add up the numbers on the guage right
    i like my plugs at .16
    its problly one of the simplest things you'll learn
     

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  12. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    Although you being 15 and knowing how to gap a plug is nice, but the majority of this generation has been brought up PC orientated. Now you tell him to use a feeler gage, someone I'm sure by the original question doesn't own one much less knows what its used for. The plug gage in the picture is by far the easiest and the most inexpensive to acquire. And .16 is 16 hundreds not 16 thousands... .016 which I feel is a tad too close.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  13. awc360

    awc360 New Member

    Thanks, I Will Use The Technology.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  14. hmmmm...ima check my spark now haha where do u think i should gap it for best performance
     
  15. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    I use a gap of around .028 BUT depending on the engine a couple of things can happen (the larger the gap), so watch for them. First it may be a little harder to start, secondly it may miss on top end, if either of these occur close the gap little by little (.003 to .005 at a time) , experimenting, along the way. Also remember the wider the gap the more voltage is needed to fire across the electrodes...the ignition system on these engines are well known and leave much to be desired. The wider the gap the better the fuel/air ratio will burn. There is a happy medium.
     
  16. thank you
     
  17. Hajuu

    Hajuu Member

    haha, yeah.. how to gap a spark plug is really.. really basic stuff.
     
  18. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    In this link you will see a NGK plug, if you check the Specifications you will see that it is a solid top and not a screw top.

    http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/we...park-Plug-NGK_19650123-P_N3411I_P|GRP2041____
     
  19. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    Yes I'm talking about the top of the plug (terminal) on top of the white part (known as the insulator)....
     

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