Schwinn Cruiser retro look

Discussion in 'Photos & Bicycle Builds' started by arkives1, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. arkives1

    arkives1 Member

    This is a one year old Schwinn Landmark cruiser.I never liked the orange color it was so I painted it, added chrome fenders, a chrome Springer front fork, a cloud 9 seat and an HDwheel from Spooky tooth. The front springer has cantilever brake bosses so the standard brakes worked well. The rear wheel has a 44t freewheel with a band brake. The tires were switched out for whitewalls. The box on the rear carrier is a 12 volt marine battery 8ah to power the LED headlight and the LED turnsignals. Easily get 20 hours run time on them. The headlight will be moved down to the front fender, the peanut gas tank will be replaced with a round one where the light is now. The horn tank sides are made of wood and hand fitted, they will be fiberglassed. The battery and an old oooooga horn will be enclosed in a red and white box on the carrier. I do not like the freewheel drive sprocket, it eliminates pedal starts as an option and sometimes is jerky when the engine slows and speeds up. The gray engine will be switched to an 80cc PK 80 and it will be black with and equipped with a pull start and centrifugal clutch. The springer fork and cloud nine sead made a big difference in the ride. The HD rear wheel's band brake moves the sprocket further to the right than I like. I cannot get the alignment with the engine that I'd like. I may make a new engine mount and shift the engine over half an inch toward the pedals.
    Every where I go people stop and point and ask me to sell it to them (until they hear my minimum price that is) It's been a long slow process and is not completed yet. I'm rather proud of her as she sits now.
    Woody
     

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  2. Sweet bike, I like it alot. Have fun and watch that front fender brackets carefully for cracking. Usually they just break without any signs, throwing you over the handlebars..
     
  3. arkives1

    arkives1 Member

    Thanks! I know about the fender brackets being a danger zone, I check everything before I ride, every time I ride. We still have some good riding weather here in Wisconsin but it is getting cooler. My other bike, an occ chopper is going up to the summer house for some October rides around the lakes there. Picture attatched.
     

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  4. james65

    james65 Member

    I was just wondering where the fender actually connects? The springer down tubes, wheel and fender braces all move so the fender can't attach steering down tube.
    Please send a picture.
     
  5. james65

    james65 Member

    cruiser

    Great looking build!
    Too bad the battery coulden"t fit inside the wooden horn tank. Good lighting system. How much time went into fabricating the horn tank?
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2010
  6. arkives1

    arkives1 Member

    I could have fitted a small battery pack of AA's in the horn tank to drive the lights but that would have really shortened the working time for them. They're all LED but I ride with the tail light and head light on at all times. It will look better once the battery and horn are enclosed in a covered box on the rack. I hate the peanut tank more.
    The fenders are attatched to the bottom of the steer tube and to the down tubes of the springer fork. Sounds illogical but it works and hasn't cracked or bent so far. I've attatched a photo. It looks like there's paint on the fork and cables but it's actually a reflection off the chrome. Frame was painted before anything was put back on it. This bike is ready to go into storage for the winter now. Still riding the OCC Stingray though.
    Hope the pic helps clear up any confusion.
     

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  7. arkives1

    arkives1 Member

    Jim, I forgot to mention that it took several hours of cutting and hand fitting the tanks and then several more hours with several coats of paint. It's all automotive paint dried under heat lamps. It takes 48 hours to cure the paint enough to handle without damage.
     
  8. RedBaronX

    RedBaronX Member

    One of my winter projects is going to be repainting my tank... it's already pretty scratched, which is not THAT big a deal for the overall look of my bike, but I'm still bummed about the scratches
     
  9. james65

    james65 Member

    cruiser

    The tank looks great! I hope to do something similar in the future. Do you have any pictures at different stages?
    The major problem with the painting/sanding is My lack of patience. Guess that is what seperates the hackers from the craftsmen.

    I had asked about the fender thing because I have a similar fork with fender. Just coulden't bring myself to connect a moving fender to a stationary point. So I rode for sometime with fender just held by the fender/axel straps (NOT A GOOD IDEA). However I did get away with it until I made some two hole clips that wraped around the moving down tubes.

    I agree that the peanut tanks look acceptable or even good on some bikes and not others. However your bike looks so good that you can get away with it.

    Later
    Jim

     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2010
  10. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Well-Known Member

    Some guys don't think a springer fork improves the ride. Mine works good and lengthens the wheelbase a bit for stability at speed.
    I'm sure you can com up with a battery box that will complement that good lookin motorbike. You can use something as simple as a small repainted coffee can mounted on the seat tube to look like and oil tank.
     
  11. arkives1

    arkives1 Member

    Schwinn Cruiser, retro look

    I'm dabbling with copper sheeting formed into a gas tank and battery box. Might be able to use brass as well but I have to learn a whole new set of skills to do much with either of them. One of my friends on here used an apple juice can for a gas tank and it looks great. I have to ask him how he vented the cap with out it splashing out. I want to move my headlight down to the top of the fender and attatch to the down tubes on the Springer. That would give me room for a round tank up front.
    The springer did definitely smooth out the ride quite a bit and the big cloud nine seat helped a lot too.
    Larry
     
  12. Irish John

    Irish John Guest

    A good springer is a more comfortable ride but the tapered steel forks on the older model Schwinn cruisers are quite twangy as well and to tell you the truth I prefer them because I don't like trusting my life on the spring bolt & nut. Those nuts on the Schwinn springer come undone frequently with catastrophic results and even though I use a locnut I never know if the bolt through the spring might snap which is an instant accident akin to losing a front wheel. Some springers have a split pin through the nut but not on Schwinns. I also like the alloy Schwinn cruiser because it is so much lighter.
    That's my experience.
     
  13. Nuttsy

    Nuttsy Member

    Oh GREAT! Now I have something new to worry about. I J, is this something that happens frequently? Examples? I've never heard of that bolt breaking or nut coming undone before. Ya think it could be replaced with a beefier bolt?
     
  14. Irish John

    Irish John Guest

    It's only on the Schwinn Deluxe Seven. The nut unscrews off the end of the bolt and I've known it to happen twice to customers who bought D7s off the same shop as me. I've bought 10 of them and I replaced the nut with a nyloc nut which seems not to want to unscrew itself. I've not known the bolt to break but it's Chinese steel and therefor I don't really trust it but the real danger is the nut and I suppose you could try a nyloc nut like I do. The fact that Schwinn sell a bike that can and does fail in a totally catastrophic way horrifies me and is indicative to me that what used to known as ethics has been replaced by the bottom line. According to my bike shop Schwinn's response BTW is that if the bike is serviced at the proper intervals the nut will be tightened before it comes completely undone. That just reinforces my point above. Use a Nyloc nut Nuttsy and stay safe.
     
  15. Nuttsy

    Nuttsy Member

    Thanks for the info Irish John. I was just looking at my springer the other day and it is NUTLESS! LOL I mean the bolt threads directly into the bracket off the headset. There isn't even room for a nut. Although this is a reproduction springer and not a Schwinn original. I guess a touch of threadlock couldn't hurt just to be on the safe side. In 2.5 years riding this springer the only thing I've had is a squeak at the rubber spring bumper. A little silicone lube now and then kills that noise.
     
  16. james65

    james65 Member

    I had a major squeek in my repo springer. Ended up putting a bronze bushing in the front of the spring support. Glad to hear that silicone works also.
     
  17. Nuttsy

    Nuttsy Member

    It works, albeit temporarily.
     
  18. Irish John

    Irish John Guest

    I was slightly wrong about the Schwinn springer. It came without a nut - the bolt just screws through the thingy off the head tube. Putting the nut on provides added protection and a nyloc nut a bit more. Ideally I'd like 2 thin nuts and then lock one against the other but there isn't much room and that mightn't be possible. What I do say however, is it is culpable of Schwinn to sell a bike on which the springer not only does come undone but will eventually come undone. It's not as if it's an inconvenience or something - it would probably be fatal if it happened at any speed. I suppose I'm just shocked at such commercial conduct and I wish we could be better protected from these criminals in suits.
     
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