Scotty's mighty D-9

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by professor, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. professor

    professor Active Member

    I was going thru my Photobucket pics and ran across this pic and thought some of you would like to see it.
    1956 Caterpillar that Scott and his dad rebuilt, the whole machine weighs 110,000#, the blade is cable-operated and I think it weighs 10,000# or ten tons (don't remember which). I asked HOW did you move the blade on and off, he said "like the Egyptians- with rollers".
    They took it to the Erie county fair one year on a hot summer day, hiring out a big rig with over- width capability, there were grooves in the road leading into the fair from the load.
    Scotty LOVES big equiptment and is always telling me about this little dozer or that one I should get. I say NO- I am going SMALLER, how much smaller than a motor bike can you get?

    Oh, the dark covering the front of the dozer is from the exhaust plume on start-up.

    [​IMG]
     

  2. Turtle Tedd

    Turtle Tedd Member

    Yup.. they did build stuff better and to last longer in them days..Oh yea..and heavy duty....could probably clear a bike path from Buffalo down here to Florida without stopping except for fuel and a little oiling
     
  3. ibdennyak

    ibdennyak Guest

    And pay the tickets for crossing main thorofares.....funny story about me in that one. Now you're talking my language. I still have a Fiat Allis HD 21-B sitting in Minnesota. Used it to pull a tile plow until about 11 or 12 years ago. Little smaller and little newer but same idea. 9' 6" to the top of the hood, 97,000 pounds plus the blade and accesorries, blade is 13 1/2 feet wide (foot and a half wider than a traffic lane) and 7 feet tall at the center. Loved that thing. Always wanted a niner.....great old machines. Kudos to Scott and his dad.
     
  4. Turtle Tedd

    Turtle Tedd Member

    Ibennyak...you are supposed to lift the blade when you cross main thorofares...oh well maybe not if you want a perfect grade....you guys could clear out some bad getto areas with those machines
     
  5. ibdennyak

    ibdennyak Guest

    Well, I do...usually, but that does remind me of a friend/competitor that didn't.

    Actually, the studded tire laws in Minnesota also apply to metal tracked vehicles. It is worded metallic objects contacting the roadway or something like that. Well, to cross an asphalt road you are required to lay down tires or planks or something, post two traffic controllers etc and then cross. I was doing some pattern tiling for a farmer who had fields on both sides on a main road. I finished on part of the job and drove the rig to the edge of the road. Nothing in site, and hadn't seen any traffic for quite a while, so I looked both ways and decided to cross slowly and without turning. Almost made it when a county deputy came flying over the hill. Of course he stopped and asked me what I was doing. I explained, and he wrote me a citation and said I could appear in court in less than a week.

    I showed up in court, and the judge asked me the particulars. I explained, and he asked if I was guilty or not. I said probably guilty. He banged the gavel and said $150.00 fine. Pay the bailiff. I went to the bailiff and gave him $300.00. He took it and started to write out a receipt. As he counted the money, he looked startled and said, Your honor, he gave me $300.00 dollars. The judge looked at me and said why? I said, well sir, I got to get it back to the other side. Bang with the gavel...$500.00 contempt of court charge. :whistling:
     
  6. srdavo

    srdavo Active Member

    :smilielol5:
     
  7. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon Active Member

    A guy I knew named Marvin had a D-9, which he obtained in the early 1950's for no money down and zero payments. The Tennessee Highway Dept bogged it down so badly that they just wrote it off, after weeks of trying to salvage it.

    Marvin got permission to attempt to salvage it, then used an Allis-Chambers backhoe to dig around it, and dig drainage ditches away from it nearly a half mile. Finally got the ground dried enough that, with a bit of work, he was able to start it and work it up out of the hole onto firmer ground. He was still operating that monster in the early 1980's.
     
  8. ibdennyak

    ibdennyak Guest

    I like the way Marvin thinks. I did have mine stuck so bad it took me over a month to get it out. Waited for the soil to dry as much as possible, tippy toed my backhoe in on the buckets, hired 3 huge winch trucks from a local moving company, and two big 4 wheel drive tractors. All this through a 2 inch nylon tow strap to a 2 inch pin in my draw bar. It bent the pin and the nylon cable shot off and took out the back and front windshields of one of the tractors. I looked up in time to see the operator of the tractor laying over the steering wheel...kind of an oh **** moment. He was OK, just laid down when he felt the lurch. Kind of an expensive lesson in cat skinning by the time I paid for everything. Hate those low and no profit jobs. :icon_cry:
     
  9. Turtle Tedd

    Turtle Tedd Member

    Time for you guys to get into some heavy duty snow plowing jobs up there from what I see on the news
     
  10. ibdennyak

    ibdennyak Guest

    Nah, wears out the undercarriage 3-4 times faster than doing it in the dirt. Another low profit job...plus freezing to death. No cab on mine. :(
     
  11. professor

    professor Active Member

    Fasinating response guys!
    Scotty and I are forever friends and I'll tell him your storys.

    Here is a pic over the hood with it running - he wanted me to see the oil pressure gauge showing pressure.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Turtle Tedd

    Turtle Tedd Member

    Thats one nice looking machine..American made museum quality
     
  13. ibdennyak

    ibdennyak Guest

    That would be Cat. Also had a D6C. Over 14,000 hrs when I retired it. If it was running, the oil guage was pegged.
     
  14. Turtle Tedd

    Turtle Tedd Member

    Professor...good thread..should be more of these . I think all of us or at least a lot of us are interested in other machines also along with motorbikes....I really liked the pics myself...
     
  15. ibdennyak

    ibdennyak Guest

    Yeah, thanks Professor.....gave me a chance to practice my *old guy in the nursing home routine*. I got a million stories of stupid stuff I did. Learned everything the hard way. :ack2:
     
  16. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon Active Member

    Don't feel like the Lone Stranger, Denny. Seems like "the hard way" was the only way I learned anything.
     
  17. srdavo

    srdavo Active Member

    Man.... I could tear up some stuff with that big Cat!!~!


    I love this quote.
     
  18. unior

    unior Member

    My grandpa used to run a d9 in west virginia on coal strip jobs. It's cool to see what one looked like! :D
     
  19. professor

    professor Active Member

    Here is my last pic. Glad you like these. The blade is cable operated from a drum on the rear. There is a pony engine that you start which then spins over the big engine.
    Scotty runs the Cat once a year and says it takes an afternoon to prepare it to run.
    He was going to break up some pavement material the town gave him for fill and I was going to film it, but time ran out last year.

    The rebuilding included sending the tracks to Canada for rebuilding, new rear sprockets (you cut off the old ones and weld new ones on), rebuilding the turbo. Don't know what else.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. cargo-master

    cargo-master Member

    What a brute!!
     
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