Should i go kit or DIY for 2 stroke bicycle?

Discussion in '2-Stroke Engines' started by Gruelius, Dec 19, 2008.

  1. Gruelius

    Gruelius New Member

    Hey all,

    Looking at doing a 2 stroke bike. Options i can see are:
    zbox "80cc"(66cc) kit http://zbox.com.au/large_engine.htm

    or

    125-160cc engine from a lawnmower or something DIY styles :D

    The second option makes me feel all happy inside but if its going to be a huge pain in the arse to get working properly i wont bother. Looking for a quick alternative mode of transport to public transport or cycling :) Would also be good if i could fly around mountain bike tracks :p

    I dont have many engine smarts but ive always wanted to learn. Few mates have offered to help me build it too. If i go the 125-160cc route am i going to have to worry about things like the clutch wearing? and if i go for a lawnmower motor how much quicker would it be than the 66cc?


    thanks
     

  2. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    take your time -- putting together some thoughts -- a good THING

    with the 125-160cc -- size of engine may be a problem
    not one that can't be worked out -- but to be taken into accout
    let's face it -- the power output would be great -- much fun
    but -- we are talking a large engine here -- just something to think about

    ride that thing -- once built
     
  3. rkbonds

    rkbonds Member

    I have to agree with Mountainman take your time. I'm using a 50cc push trailer and couldn't be happier with it. I think if you have the abilities to build your own set up go for it but, if not then go for the kit.
     
  4. bluegoatwoods

    bluegoatwoods Well-Known Member

    I guess my advice would depend on how much fabrication you are willing and able to do.

    Will you be able to make your own motor mounts, for instance? And will you be able to design and build your own drive train?

    If the answer is no, then you want to go with a kit.

    100-plus cc would be powerfull. But if you actually used all that power you'd be a lot more likely to destroy your bicycle. That ought to be taken into account, too.

    I think I'd be a bit more likely to go with the kit. But either way, you ought to get right on it. Build your bike and tell us all about it. We can't get enough of it.

    So have fun.
     
  5. hill climber

    hill climber Member

    you said your"looking for a quick alternative". quick as in needing it know, go with the kit. if you got time and dont need it right away build your own. the kit is instant gratificasion. diy is way more fun though.
     
  6. MotorMac

    MotorMac Member

    kit

    Yes get a kit, you will learn how things go together and gain valuable knowledge, then in the near future you will know if you can put a DIY setup together. Maybe take a welding course or 2 in the meantime as well.
     
  7. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    glad that rkbonds chimed in

    glad that rkbonds chimed in
    because I was thinking -- all of that raw power in a push trailer
    would be a LOT OF FUN -- someTHING to think about !!!
    a lot of torque -- just don't want to TWIST that THING off !!!

    ride that THING
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2008
  8. Pezz

    Pezz New Member

    Gruelius

    I went through the same thing and weighing 100kg's was concerned about the power output.

    I have a 160cc Victa single 2 stroke lawnmower engine and currently I am trying to come up with a clutch setup. I will be doing some porting work and expansion chamber.

    One option I have been considering is making a barrell out of seamless steam pipe and inserting 3 pocket bike centrifugal clutch's with in.

    I have a Lathe so fabrication is a lot easier. Im going to run a reduction drive using chain sprockets to get he 5000rpm down to 620 rpm at the back wheel which in turn gives about 70+KPH.

    I will be posting a tread on it when it starts in earnest in the next few weeks.

    I am in a scrap heap challenge with some friends where we have to put 'any' engine in a pushbike frame and race each other around a friends farm. Max spend is $200. Lots of scavenging.

    I also have a 170 Victa twin which i will build up next.

    If you have the time the bigger engine is a great option but there are a lot of difficulties to engineer through. The Kit is plug and play.

    :cool2:
     
  9. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    I have three Staton kits, front friction, rear friction and rear chain drive, costing at least $1700 on three bikes. I also have an electric hub.

    My first MB was a girlie cruiser w/electric hub, 72 volts and 80 lbs of batteries. That didn't last long 'cause I got tired of removing and charging batteries.

    Need more power.

    My next bike was a 20" Dahon. It rode perfectly with a 1.6hp Robin engine. When I installed the 2.2hp Mitsubishi engine and chain drive, something told me to sell the squirrelly bike before I killed myself.

    Still need more power.

    Then I went back to the girlie cruiser, installed 2.2hp Mits engine and rear friction drive. Great ride with ROCKSHOX suspension fork.

    Need more power.

    So I ordered front friction drive w/2.2hp Mits engine. Front drive wouldn't bolt onto ROCKSHOX fork, so I bought a Raleigh 7-speed bike and installed front and rear engines. The "Iron Dragon" was born.

    Power was great!

    Need rear chain drive, because two friction drives had too much resistance drag. Changed to rear chain drive, which was BIG improvement. Need to swap sprockets and friction rollers to optimize performance.

    Got the bug to build a pusher trailer. Robin 6hp engine cost me $105 + shipping. All other parts should cost me $100 tops.

    This will definitely be my cheapest, most powerful, most satisfying build.

    There will no longer be a need for more power after this build.:devilish:

    My advice? Start off with a Staton kit, then build a DIY MB.

    Visit the DIY section of www.motorbicycling.com

    Ask for deacon.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2008
  10. Heshtek

    Heshtek New Member

    Go with the kit first. If you don't have many 'engine smarts' designing your own is going to be a pain. You will learn a bit by installing and maintaining a kit maybe do that then think about designing your own.
     
Loading...