solid, flat-free tires

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by iwasgandhi, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. iwasgandhi

    iwasgandhi New Member

    Since the end of August I've been riding a Staton-inc axle mounted kit (w/a 35cc four-stroke Robin-Subaru engine) on my 26 inch tire mountain bike. I've had two rear flats in three months while riding on-road, the first time using a "regular tire/Mr.Tuffy brand tire liner/air-filled tube" combo, and the second time using an "Armadillo brand thorn-resistant tire/Mr.Tuffy brand tire liner/Sunlite brand thorn-resistant tube" triple combo. Ugh,...:sweatdrop:

    So I'd now like to pick the brains of those MB enthusiasts familiar with using a solid, flat-free tire on the rear rim, especially in cold, snowy climates. I'd welcome any feedback on this subject. If no one is familiar with this then maybe we can whip up an electronic brain storm of sorts,...

    I don't want to use a thickly reinforced rear tire, or a thorn-resistant tire liner that inserts between the tire and tube, or an air-filled slime tube but, rather, a solid tire on the rear rim in order to completely avoid rear tire flats.

    The only website I know of selling such tires is www.airfreetires.com but they don't sell studded winter tires (in the event of black ice and/or slick, packed snow on roads). Are there other good sites? Do studded solid tires even exist? On my pedal bike I use 26 x 1.95 studded tires with regular tubes for on-road use in the winter.

    This winter I could, of course, use a non-studded knobby-treaded solid tire on the rear rim and a studded tire (with an air-filled tube) on the front rim in a sort of 1/2 & 1/2 compromise. But how would that handle and perform on slick surfaces? I'm willing to make that kind of compromise, if there's no better alternative, in order to avoid rear tire flats in cold, snowy weather.

    My MB is a cherished possession as it's my only motorized vehicle. I often venture on 50 mile trips. I don't want to risk getting a rear flat, especially when it's cold out (it can drop to -10F in NH) as it can take over an hour to remove and reinstall the rear tire on my Staton-inc axle mount kit in ideal conditions such as a room-temperature tool-filled work area w/good lighting.

    Thank you.
     

  2. Flattracker

    Flattracker Member

    no good

    been there done that.

    Six years ago after using up all the patches in an inner tube patch kit within 30 miles, I was determined not to get another flat. I've used "NO-MOR-FLATS" solid urethane inner tubes for 6 years. They roll SLOW on a bike. I still use them in my bike trailer though.

    Takes a lot of energy to go fast. Rear failed on a long road trip. Carried a heavy load in my backpack. The urethane tube crushed down, and compressed under the weight. This caused the tire to come off the rim like in a normal flat.

    Well, the rim cut into the urethane tube slicing long-ways destroying it rendering it useless. I went back to air tubes.

    DO NOT BUY SOLID AIRFREE TIRES!!!! LAST YEAR I PAID $150 DOLLARS FOR TWO CUSTOM 130 PSI TIRES.

    AFTER WAITING TWO MONTHS ONE ARRIVED TORN AROUND THE TIRE IN 5 PLACES ALMOST IN HALF IN ONE SPOT.

    THEY WILL ONLY FIT WHEELS 17MM- 24MM WIDE. WHEN INSTALLED ON MY 24MM WIDE SUNRIMS RHYNOLITES FRONT RIM IT WAS TOO LOOSE TO USE.

    THE TIRE DIDNT FIT TIGHTLY IN THE RIM LIKE THEY ADVERTISE, AND RIDING MY BIKE, IT FELT LIKE IT WAS FLAT, AND READY TO JUMP OFF THE RIM! VERY LOOSE AND UNSTEADY FEELING RIDING.

    AFTER USING THEIR TOOL THAT I PAID $20 EXTRA FOR TO INSTALL THEM ON MY WHEELS, I COULD ACTUALLY PULL THE TIRE SIDEWAYS OFF THE RIM BY HAND!!!

    THEY ARE NOT EVEN SHAPED LIKE THE ONES ADVERTISED. THE SIDE TABS THAT ARE SUPPOSED TO LOCK THE TIRE TO THE RIM WERE NOT THERE, AND MY TIRE WILL NOT LOCK INTO THE RIM. ITS JUST STRETCHED OVER THE

    RIM LIKE A BIG RUBBER BAND. I ABSOLUTLY HATE THESE TIRES!

    I CONTACTED AIRFREE NUMEROUS TIMES TO RETURN THEM AND THEY NEVER ANSWERED THE PHONE.

    AIRFREE TIRES COMPLETELY IGNORED ME. A TELEPHONE NUMBER FOR THEM IS ALMOST NONEXISTANT, AND WHEN YOU DO FINALLY FIND ONE THEY NEVER ANSWER THE PHONE.

    I CALLED THEM BECAUSE THEIR ONLINE SYSTEM IS USELESS FOR SETTING UP AN APPOINTMENT TO TALK TO YOU. YOU MAKE THE APPOINTMENT, THEY IGNORE YOU. THEY NEVER EVEN EMAILED ME. I STILL HAVE THE TIRES. THEY USE THEIR SYSTEM TO FILTER RETURNS TO

    AVOID DEALING WITH FOLKS RETURNING THEIR CRAPPY PRODUCT. TO THIS DAY THEY NEVER, EVER CONTACTED ME.

    If you're looking to get killed, or to hit the jackpot with your insurance company, or attorney use them.

    Save yourself the headache, and some cash. Get yourself some "Mr-Tuffy" tire liners like I did ( they work fantastic!), or some expensive tires with the flat guard built in.

    P.S. I have two "AirFree Tires" for sale!
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2011
  3. I agree. Those things are JUNK. Even when working as designed, they are the equivalent of about 15 psi. Not enough for road use. I use a friction drive system, and they would obviously not work with that. I use good tires, and puncture resistant tubes, but flats will happen. As far as I know, there is nothing you can do to prevent it. Using a standard tube will almost guarantee a flat before you get out of the driveway. And when those things get punctured, they pop like a balloon, making them unpatchable most of the time. Our local bike lanes are littered with punctured tubes left there when some Tour de France type rider has a flat, stops and replaces his tube, uncaringly tosses the old one on the ground, and goes on. The puncture resistant tubes can be patched a good part of the time, plus, being about 4mm thick, they have enough surface area between the inside and outside for sealants to work unless it is a really big puncture. I carry 2 extra tubes, tools to remove and replace the wheel and tire, a "good" patch kit, a pump, and a bottle of Slime.
     
  4. Happy Valley

    Happy Valley Active Member

    Heh Flattacker, don't hold back tell us how you really feel. Just kiddin'.:devilish:

    iwasgandhi:
    Seem after advancing from solid tires a hundred years ago to pneumatics why go back? Excessive flats I can understand are no fun but maybe there's something else going on? With the kevlar/tuffy/thick tube seems like you were doing all the right things but maybe it was just a fluke if it only happened once. Pinch flat maybe, sharp object road hazard, something that wouldn't be likely to reoccur? Maybe a different tire or tube? Just saying, I did an 800 mile trip with loaded touring gear this summer and not one flat using different brands that you mentioned but otherwise an identical config of tire/liner/thorn proof tubes (no slime).
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2011