sproket fitting

Discussion in 'Frame Mounted Engines' started by blompod, Dec 9, 2006.

  1. blompod

    blompod Guest

    which way should the sproket fit? dish in, dish out? Teeth in teeth out? and also the rubber rag things, one set of instructions says to use one on the inside of the spokes and one on the outside of the spokes and sandwich the spokes by them and bolt the sproket to that, and the instructions on the Grubee site says to just use one on the inside and bolt the sproket flush with the spokes, whats the best way? And what to do if the throttle cable is too short, want to use a nice leaver type throttle but the stock cable is about 2'' too short. cant just pick up a longer one coz you need that little nib end that goes into the carby. Thanks :)

  2. davidsis

    davidsis Guest


    I sandwiched the two rubber things They will compress. Count the threads on each bolt so all the same. , also the sprocket goes out on mine, but if your tire will clear and is more lined up with the engine when inboard put teeth inboard.
  3. bird

    bird Guest

    the sproket allways has to face out and if the chain isant straight space your wheel over with washers on your axle to keep everthing lined up.

    if your cable doesnt work you can use clutch cable and just sodder a bubble on the end big enought to not slide threw. you have to use the good sodder tho so it doesnt slide off the cable.
  4. Edward

    Edward Guest

    The sprocket mounting is as much art as science and can be mounted dish out or dish in depending on alignment of the chain.
  5. Tom

    Tom Active Member

    My teeth face in which lines the chain up nicely. I can have mine face in because I don't have any tire clearance issues with my smaller mountain bike tires.
  6. philcred

    philcred Guest


    i fitted my sprocket to my rear disc brake. the only way to have a rear brake and sprocket was to buy a 205mm brake disc and 34 tooth sprocket. the bike engine pulls great and does well over 40mph.
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Teeth in teeth out, whichever lines up best....both my bikes have the teeth in. The rag/rubbers go on each side of the spokes and tighten evenly in a cross pattern (like you'd do lug nuts, or head bolts) until they are all tight, as in pretty firm but not until you break something.

    Yes, you can solder the end of another cable until it's big enough, just try to use silver solder and make it big as possible, then file the glob down until it fits right...I did it on a dirt bike when I was 14 years old, so it can't be that hard to do. :)
  8. JosephGarcia

    JosephGarcia Guest

    Use both the rubber discs, one on each side.

    And do whatever you need to with the sprocket to make it line up with the engine, if it hits your tire, use a skinnier tire, dont settle for a misaligned sprocket. I did this for a week and it wore a good amount off my rear sprocket, I can still use it for a while, but I should replace it soon.

    On that note (this is just a side question, if you can answer it, send me a PM to keep this topic clean) how much low end power would I LOSE If i switched to a 36 tooth sprocket. My 44 is awesome at both, but i dont want to sped 15 minutes accelerating into my top speed. PM me with answer, i just didnt want to start new thread for this.
  9. gone_fishin

    gone_fishin Guest

    very good advice...i had to unwillingly limit myself to a 1.95 tire but now i'm not sorry at all.

    my sprocket's set teeth-in for a beauty alignment with the drive sprocket.

    sprocket-donut-spokes-donut-backing ring