spyware

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by davidsis, Dec 21, 2008.

  1. davidsis

    davidsis Guest

    Anyone know of a free way of getting all of the junk off of my computer, like how and where to download some free spyware remover software or what to do?
     

  2. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    I have had good luck with these free two

    Spybot Search & Destroy

    SUPERAntispyware.exe

    ride that thing
     
  3. KilroyCD

    KilroyCD Active Member

  4. arceeguy

    arceeguy Active Member

    AdAware is another good one.
    Along with spybot s&d, they will usually remove all but the most nasty malware.

    Of course, staying away from "those sites" will protect your computer the best!
     
  5. bluegoatwoods

    bluegoatwoods Well-Known Member

    I'll vouch for Spybot Search and Destroy.

    I use it and it seems to work just fine. At least I've seen no downside.

    The scan takes a bit of time. But that's not a big problem; run it when you're not going to use the computer for a while.
     
  6. sparky

    sparky Active Member

    The best fighter of spyware, trojans, & viruses is UNIX/LINUX.

    If you're not so fortunate as to run a non-Windows OS, I just installed Avira AntiVir on my sister's computer and it seemed to be a decent free virus/trojan detector. I've used AdAware for spyware before, but I'm not sure it's as good as Spybot S&D.

    Ubuntu for the win!! Comes with an office suite compatible with Microsoft files, Transmission for bittorrent DLs, Firefox since it's the best browser ever, a package manager that lets you install tens of thousands of open source packages (applications) so that you'll never have to scour for "clean" programs... they're all in this central repository. You can also add Boxee onto an Ubuntu or OS X install now. Boxee is one of the coolest applications ever created; it's a frontend GUI for many online TV shows that adds in a hint of social networking by telling you what your friends have watched. Very neat.

    I'd really like to know why people still use Windows for tasks other than gaming.
     
  7. ZnsaneRyder

    ZnsaneRyder Member

    Best way IMO, remove Windows completely, and reinstall fresh clean Windows. 100% works every time.

    But yes, the other programs mentioned here do work, but even then, some spyware is so evil and still lingers around, or even if it's gone, some stuff is never the same because so many windows files and settings got replaced.
     
  8. arceeguy

    arceeguy Active Member

    Ahhh yes, sooner or later Linux rears its ugly head! hahahaha!

    I've made a career of administering HP-UX, Solaris and Red Hat systems. I am a big proponent of *NIX operating systems for servers. But, (IMHO) Linux based operating systems are not ready for your typical mainstream desktop user. Windows dominates because for the most part, Windows works quite well and it is very easy to use.

    Check out some funny vids below:

    South Park Mac vs. PC

    Another PC vs. Mac

    If you keep your Windows PC updated, and log in with a non-administrative account when surfing - you will be safe from malware an viruses. If you get a virus from downloading pirated software, movies and music - you are getting what you deserve!

    Linux and Mac systems would be the target of viruses IF there were enough of them around to make it worthwhile for the hackers.
     
  9. sparky

    sparky Active Member

    Windows dominates today for the same reason that it overtook Apple in the early 90s. It comes as default on all the cheap, standardized hardware.

    Ubuntu really is ready for 70+% of mainstream users. Almost everybody who has a computer in my immediate family uses it because either my brother or I set it up for them. If I wrote a Crash Course for Ubuntu N00Bs, I think it'd be far, far shorter than the MB Crash Course... and it would only take a few minutes to get over the basic concepts that separates Linux from other OSes.

    Opening files is inevitable. Windows users must stop and ask themselves if it's a good idea, whereas I never waste time with that process as I have no fear.

    Doubtful. Most applications are downloaded from a central repository, similar to Apple's App Store... so there's no guessing there when you'd actually need admin permissions to install software. And any other files I open will never have the admin permissions to do anything malicious to begin with.

    The only malicious thing that could happen is deleting all the files in my /home directory, which I already have backed up anyway. Plus, cutting power to the computer immediately after something like that just happened could possibly save me the trouble of even having to copy stuff back from the backup drive.
     
  10. arceeguy

    arceeguy Active Member

    I disagree. It is number 1 because it is easy to use, and just about every peripheral comes with software and device drivers for Windows. (Like digital cameras, etc.) And anyone can install the software and drivers because the software packaging is standardized. Linux pizzes people off because of the myriad of ways to install software depending on which particular distro you are running. Various Linux distros are coming with cheap hardware. The Asus eee PC can be had in Linux and Windows versions. The Windoze versions are almost always sold out despite the higher price. The Linux models are always in stock.

    Apple OS-X could be popular if they ported it to run on x86 architecture, but then it would become just as unstable as Windows. One of the reasons why Macs are more stable is that Apple controls all the hardware as well as the operating system so poorly written device drivers from crappy hardware (or crappy hardware) can't cause system instability.

    That was quite a contradictory statement! If they had set it up themselves, then maybe you would have a valid point.


    What makes windows easy (opening executables with a click-click) also makes it dangerous for an uninformed user. People should think about what they are clicking on. Having "no fear" because you feel you don't have to think is not really something to brag about.

    The key word is "most". If it isn't in the app get list, it isn't a "double click" easy install.

    Oh, is that all? :)
     
  11. sparky

    sparky Active Member

    Linux really does accept most hardware nowadays, out of the box, even. XP and Vista don't have nearly as much outta box driver support as Ubuntu or any modern Linux distro for that matter. All cameras are supported. All external hard drives and flash drives are supported. All ethernet cards are supported (software modems didn't work with Linux because they offloaded all calculations to software that wa designed for Windows... essentially, not much hardware at all; nearly all hardware that is worthwhile works under Linux). All processors are supported, not just Intel. All graphics cards are supported (this was my biggest problem when trying out Linux while I was younger... Trident graphics card wasn't supported then, but ATI, NVIDIA, & Intel have taken over graphics for now, and they're all heavily supported under Linux today). Do you have a specific example of something that isn't supported??

    There could be numerous reasons that eee PCs are sold out of the XP versions and not the Linux versions: people that afraid to move from Windows, people that are too dumb to buy a real laptop (10~14" is a real laptop), since the Linux version came out first, perhaps word has spread quickly among Linux followers that the hardware isn't usable for most purposes, people that want the 160GB HD as opposed to a smaller capacity SSD (and some who could easily install Linux over the stock Windows install), people who found a better deal on the XP version (heard about this, but haven't seen specific examples of one place that gave better hardware per $, excluding the Windows version with 160GB HD), or perhaps even retailers who have a ton of Linux installs because they could easily install Windows over it after receiving a valid license. Honestly, it's not just limited to the choice of OS, but considering the hardware is the same between most all versions, I'm wondering why one would be sold out and not the other. I'm really interested to know where the XP version of the eee PC is sold out, RC.

    Umm... Apple *did* port OS X to run on the Intel x86 architecture. Nearly 20 years too late, tho. Macs are better than PCs because of Steve Jobs' vision & leadership... plain and simple.

    Was it? The 2 statements were that Linux is ready for 70% of mainstream users and that Windows dominates because it's the default OS. Because it's the dominant OS, people are afraid to setup a dual boot drive or to try a virtualized Ubuntu install or to install Wubi (essentially Ubuntu on top of Windows) or to even boot up a LiveCD. People are just afraid, and the only thing I can figure out is that everybody else isn't doing it. In the past year that I've been telling people that Linux is ready for the desktop, only one family member has tried a LiveCD & he loved it. Fear, Uncertainty, & Doubt is what (FUD) keeps Windows on top.

    It is. The way I can scroll thru windows in the task list also is. The way I can customize where the volume applet is on my panel, or panels even, is also another thing to brag about. There's several things to brag about, and each one of them is a reason I will never use Windows if I don't have to.

    Oh and BTW, installing those other applications on Linux is as easy as double clicking on a .deb file. This installer is called Gdebi. I've hardly had to do this, however, as most OSS developers provide users with a repository. This allows the package manager to upgrade the versions of packages without another double-click again, even... it essentially becomes any other application on your computer that is routinely upgraded.

    And there will never be any fear of giving root (admin) access to the Gdebi installer or the apt-get, aptitude, or synaptic package managers. The reason is due to the nature of deb files.... it's essentially the files and a list of where the files need to go. It's not an exectuable (.exe) that can do whatever it wants while using admin privileges.

    Umm... yes it is. Why don't you give Ubuntu a try on your PC someday, RC? There are numerous ways to try it out.

    Actually, yes.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2009
  12. arceeguy

    arceeguy Active Member

    I'm thinking of hardware upgrades in the future. Buy a new scanner, then have to wait until someone codes a driver for it. Didn't you watch the vids? :p

    And while Linux may allow you to plug in your digital camera, you are forced to use Linux apps because I don't know of any camera manufacturer that bundles their software with PC/Mac and various Linux versions.


    Awesome! I'll be looking forward to purchasing OS-X Leopard and loading it on my PC tomorrow. Does it already have the drivers built in for my nVidia 9400GT? I can't seem to find OS-X drivers on the nVidia website......:goofy:

    As far as Steve Jobs goes, it looks like Bill Gates might have slightly outdone him in the vision and leadership departments. The Betamax video format was superior to VHS, so Macs may be superior to PC's but.........

    Like I said, I already work with plenty of *NIX systems. Haven't tried ubuntu, but can't see that it is much better than the Debian distro it is based off of. All I can say is that if it were as easy and pain free and wonderful as you say, it would have more than 1% of the desktop market. I will say that Linux makes an awesome Apache/MySQL/PHP server for forums like this!
     
  13. sparky

    sparky Active Member

    What is it that the software from the camera manufacturer's offers you? I simply want to copy pictures to my HD or wherever, and then I can use any photo editing software of my choice. What's the problem?

    I see it as more of a problem that a manufacturer would lock you into using their software just to copy files, like iTunes. When an iPod is docked, it should open a file browser and let you copy whatever it is you want... or play with whatever software music player you'd like. Vendor lock-in is really what am most against in "computer land". Stop locking things to one platform or another, and I might buy your product(s).

    You can't purchase it because Apple has found that it's more profitable for them when you buy the whole PC. You can, however, download OSX86 and run it on most any PC you'd like. Don't quote me on this, tho... because I run Ubuntu as there's nothing OS X offers me over what I already have on this free OS.

    Bill Gates' leadership is that he stole the vision and saw a more profitable venture than Steve. And we won't know who outdid who until history is no more...

    You should try it. If you haven't tried it in the past 3 years... you prolly haven't been using Linux that much.