Tires Surly endomorph tires

Discussion in 'Bicycle Repair' started by BeauBoy, Apr 15, 2010.

  1. BeauBoy

    BeauBoy Member

    Ok so I am building a bike for bush and beach riding, aswell as on roads for a short while untill I get to the tracks.

    The tires that interest me ae the surly endomorphs for a go anywhere ride.

    I actually dont know what my frame is as I bought it for 10 bucks and its been stripped and painted a few times, now I'm stripping it again, looks like an 80's giant frame to me. Anyway I put on a pugsly fork and I measured it all up and it will fit the rear tire aswell.

    What do you think? Does anyone have these on MB's?
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2010

  2. mabman

    mabman Member

    The problem you will have is that the tires are so wide they interfere with a standard drive train. Not being sure what type of power system you are planning on it is hard to say yes for sure, but it has been done. The endo's are heavy and expensive but should last you a long time just riding them on the sand as long as you don't have too much sharp rock around.
  3. DougC

    DougC Guest

    I've not heard or seen Endomorphs on a regular MTB frame, but I don't follow that scene very much.

    I would advise asking on more-mainstream MTB forums if this is even worth attempting. The Pugsly frame uses an extra-side rear end and bottom bracket, and even at that is still limited to using single-speed or internal-gear hubs.

    My guess is that if you can even get all the parts on there, it's not likely to work well unless you can modify/re-weld the frame and obtain (or make) a wider bottom-bracket,,,, the same as what Surly did.


    The Surly Pugsley is the first upright bicycle I have pondered buying in a long time.
    There's two problems stopping me:
    --first is that it's expensive; most people who build a pretty plain 8-speed bike end up spending $1200-$1400 in the process.
    --The second is that (because of the tire width, and the rear horizontal frame dropouts) you are limited to using internal-gear hubs for a multi-speed bike, and internal-gear hubs aren't known for their low-speed, high-torque durability,,,,,,, but if you're doing hardcore riding off-road, that's exactly how it would get used.
  4. DougC

    DougC Guest

    This post may not have made a lot of sense, due to one single typo-
    The chain is still going to need help though (if you wanted a regular-pedaling chain, that is).......
  5. reb1

    reb1 Member

    You can use a full set of gears on a pugsly. The fork is spaced 135mm as are the rear drop outs. One of the riders who spent 42 months riding on dirt roads from Alaska to the botom of South America rode a modified long tail with the endorph tires and a rohloff hub part of the way. The videos on there site are fun. You would need probably need the large marge rims and would need a frame that is for disk brakes if you did not use there pugsley frame.