The "Red Hornet" a slightly different twist

Discussion in 'Photos & Bicycle Builds' started by Scootmeister, Sep 16, 2011.

  1. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Here are some photos of my first build. It was a lot of work and took twice as much time as I expected. I started out with a Murray cruiser and added a Grubee 66cc kit. Soon I converted to a 4-stroke with Stage III gearbox. After that I started customizing and before I knew it all of my spare time was being consumed!!! Anyway, here are some photos, I hope you enjoy it and I would appreciate any comments or suggestions. I can also provide detailed specs if you see any ideas you can use. Thanks for looking:

    http://s1231.photobucket.com/albums/ee501/scootmeister/
     

    Attached Files:


  2. onewheelgone

    onewheelgone New Member

    Looks great....an evolving work of art! I like that springer...where did you find it?
     
  3. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    I like it a lot better without the saddle bags.
    The disk brakes take away from the vintage look (i know, safety first) but the shifter looks really cool.
    The seat looks enormous to me, but that's just my opinion.
    It's a great looking bike overall tho!
    You will find that these bikes are never truly "done".
    If you are a tinkerer, fabricator, painter, or anything like that (like me) you will always find something that you can change, improve on or customize on these bikes.
    seems like i'm always trying to fabricate a new part that came to me in a thought, customize this, change that, modify those...it never ends...lol
     
  4. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Thanks One Wheel. I'm glad you like it. I realize it won't appeal to everyone,, just started bolting parts on and it took on a design of its own. Anyway, it's fun and frivolous (little kids and teenagers love it), plus it didn't cost me much. Most of the custom parts, including the springer front end, were fabricated from standard hardware parts or stuff from the scrap yard. The springer was made from steel rods, hardware springs, and plate steel. It took a lot of cutting with a jig saw and a bunch of grinding. I learned I am not a very good welder, but I'm a great grinder!!! Not too swift as a painter either. For some reason, spray cans don't like me much. The hardest part was coming up with the right measurements, a lot of trial and error, mostly error. And yes, the seat is pretty big, but its comfy and strong. I can ride for hours without butt fatigue. The bike does look a lot better without the bags, but on a trip to town the bags are great for carrying water bottles, tools, baseball cap, etc. Thanks for the feedback, it's helpful.
     
  5. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Hey, Motorpsycho. Where can I find some photos of your ride?
     
  6. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    well. like everyone else, you have to start somewhere. Building one of these bikes is a great learning experience, and a great way to hone skills (like welding, painting and grinding).
     
  7. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    Just click on my name and it will take you to my page. On the right, you will find a picture gallery with pics of my bikes in there.
    a few of the pics are of my bikes when i first built them, but i've made changes to both of them since then. I'm putting some more recent pics. in my album right now.
    I just added 2 new albums to my prifile with LOTS of pics. some are my bikes, some are the things that i've built over the years, freinds cars, as well as some of my dads cars.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2011
  8. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    The Big Red Bike.

    I like it a lot. The seat is great, I'm all for a comfy ride. I just like the chrome headlight better. Keep up the good work.
    Big Red.
     
  9. Big Red

    Big Red Active Member

    Moto's cool stuff

    Hey Moto, It's little wonder that you're the builder you are today, Growing up with a builder like your dad. I wasn't as lucky and am pretty much self taught. Your Pop's taught you well. You really have a lot of very cool stuff. If your dad's still around, you should call him right now to just say Thanks.
    Big Red.
     
  10. Scootmeister

    Scootmeister Member

    Hey Moto, I went to college in Bloomington, grew up in Columbus. Do people ever ask you why you mess with MBs when you have a classic motorcycle to ride? I get asked all the time. My motorcycle riding buddies rag me all the time about having a thing for pedals!!!! Anyway, I like your OCC. I have three that I picked up for a song, a chrome one, a red one, and a black one. Can't really decide what to do with them. I was going to do the black one next, but found the Stiletto and it's set up better for motorizing, disc brakes and built in jackshaft. I would like to put an OCC rear wheel on the Stiletto but there isn't enough clearance. The rear knockouts on the OCC are about 1 to 1 1/2" wider than the Stiletto. I thought about stretching the frame, but don't want to ruin the frame. Any ideas? I would chop and weld, but I'm a lousy welder. BTW, when we rode Triumphs and BSAs in high school in Columbus we had a saying that they should come with a 6-pack of pistons. The carbs would lean out, probably because of air leaks, and we would invariably burn a piston.
     
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