Thinking about Motorizing my bike!

Discussion in 'Photos & Bicycle Builds' started by SEGACDX, Aug 30, 2013.

  1. SEGACDX

    SEGACDX Member

    I've been thinking of saving up 2000$ or more for a moped but I just don't have that kind of money!

    I do need a way to get around and with all the main roads being near by biking is a good way to do that.

    I've got a few pic of my bike and I was wondering if you all could help me out.

    I know I made need to make some mods to fit the motor but I want to know what you guys think!

    Images are here ---> http://imgur.com/a/oaJPe
     

  2. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    Your options with that bike are very limited. Due to the fact that the shock goes through the bottom of the triangle, an in-frame engine is not a possibility unless you were to somehow convert the bike to a hardtail (remove the rear suspension and most likely have to weld the frame together). So your only options are friction drive or rack-mounted chain drive. Friction drive is when an engine sits above the front or rear tire and spins a roller that in turn spins the tire. A rack-mounted chain drive would involve something similar, but instead of a roller you would have a sprocket on the rear wheel and a chain going from the engine to drive the wheel. The engine would be mounted on a rack, just as it is with friction drive. If you were to do a rack mounted chain drive, you would need a spring-loaded chain tensioner, because with the rear suspension, any time the rear part of the frame moves the chain will go slack and without a spring-loaded tensioner, it will jump off. I might suggest selling this bike and finding a similar one without rear suspension. It will give you a lot more options.
     
  3. SEGACDX

    SEGACDX Member

    Motor Dimensions?

    Could you or someone measure the motor and tell me how big it is so I can try to find a bike that may work?
     
  4. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    You need 17" or more in the front triangle to be able to mount any kind of motor in-frame.
     
  5. SEGACDX

    SEGACDX Member

  6. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    I don't think 29" rims will fit on that frame. But yes, its a decent frame made out of aircraft grade aluminum. Worth the money, even counting the fact that you may need to buy other parts to make it work.
     
  7. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    My suggestion would be to find a good used mtn. bike with a triangular
    frame, hard tail. you can always add a suitable suspension fork. Full
    suspension bikes can be motored,but that requires either a lot of
    mods, a lot of money, or both.
    There are bargains to be found on craigslist, but it might take time to
    find what you want at the price you want. In my experience any listing
    with 'rare' or 'vintage' is usually asking at least twice what it's worth.
    But not always.
     
  8. SEGACDX

    SEGACDX Member

  9. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    That looks like it'll work. Don't know where CCM
    gets their bikes since they put their own decals on.
    my only worry would be the quality of the frame
    which is why I like tried true used bikes, that and
    the fact patience will get you a high quality bike
    cheap.
    I see you're in Langley; would that by Langley
    Washington, cuz I right across the sound on the
    Oly. Pen.
     
  10. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    There are many of us who don't like aluminium frames. Many of us prefer steel frames. They're much stronger and less prone to cracking due to engine viberation. Steel frames are cheaper and much easier to weld on as well.
     
  11. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    Very good point, LR,
    I second that. These days a $200 mtn bike is a cheap bike. On the
    other hand, rock solid mtn bikes from the late '80 & early '90s can
    often be found for $100 and a bit of tuning.
     
  12. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    Just been busily goggling and fleabaying for cro-mo frames.. not having any luck.
    Could anyone suggest popular cro-mo frames they know of that really are "rock solid" strong (I'd rather not have to pay a welder if I can avoid it) and have a standard 1&1/8" aheadset? All I'm seeing is 1" steerer quill stem bikes. I know some use those for MBing; but EEK, not for me! :sweatdrop:
    Perhaps a recommended/ unrecommended frame list could be a new thread?? If so tell me, I'll start one! :)
    Maybe I can find a converter headset bearing to adapt an old frame to a modern and safe 1&18" aheadset fork & stem. I know they existed for when BMX standards switched over, but whether I can prize the ONE converter I've ever seen off my friend IDK.. unlikely he'll part with it.. since I um, already told him about MB and he'll know what I want it for. (oops!) :dunce:
    I had a GT Timberline (unmotored) cro-mo frame made for 1&18" steerer and snapped the headtube right off so I had two unicycles. :jester: So don't get one of those! Or at least weld a huge gusset the headtube. :helmet:
     
  13. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    I guess it's hard to find good used bikes in the Uk. My first suggestion
    would be a used Giant since they originated in the low counties. Globallly
    there are a lot of 'em. Maybe not chromo, but a solid steel bike. Old
    Bridgestones are usually chromo. but likely few and far between in Leekland.
    I'd think there'd be plenty of older raleighs floating around, good steel
    though a bit dodgy at the seat post/chainstay weld. Can't say as far as
    adaptable forks go. I ride a U.S. made raleigh. Tubes alu, the rest is chromo,
    relatively light yet quite strong. It's survived a lot of abuse.
    That said, I'm no expert on European bikes.

    P.S. i'm not fond of GT's or Cannondales. and many good bike firms have
    suffered a loss of quality since the '90s.
     
  14. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    Furry,
    It's a shame you're not here; I'm seeing all kinds of
    great candidates on today's list. There's an old school
    KHS going for a song. The guy obviously hasn't a
    clue. Keep your eye out for a Koga. I got one for 15$
    a couple weeks ago, spent $70 restoring it and hung
    a $380 Japanese engine on it. Zoom! Super Clunker.
     
  15. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    Giants are actually the offspring of the Koga. In "86 Koga
    merged with Myata and created Giant which is now made
    in Japan,Taiwan, & the Netherlands, also mainland China
    I believe. The '86 Koga mtn. bike was the 1st purpose-
    bilt civilian mtn. bike made in Europe. It was a hodge-podge
    of Dutch, German, Japanese, and Taiwanese parts with
    absurdly over-engineered German brakes with way to many
    parts that could never work well. I know this because
    that's the one I have. The frame is bomb-proof.
     
  16. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    P.S. Koga still makes high quality bikes, the 'World Traveler'
    was recently voted European bike of the year, but try to buy
    one. They cost more than a good used car.
     
  17. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member

    29" rolls over bumpy roads better.. if you ride on good smooth roads and skateparks, 24" rolls nearly as fast. 29" has a longer footprint which both increases grip and (decreases tyre deformation and thus) rolling resistance. 24" is stiffer as it's a lower lateral leverage when turning/ crashing/ mounting kerbs at an angle, stronger due to being a smaller circle like a castle tower, not that you have those in US.. um okay like a stone arch. :) For crosscountry: a 26" wheel has 2" less diameter, therefore over 6" less tyre circumference, a significant weight saving an fat dirt tyres; though it has the higher rolling resistance over bumpy terrain, so it's a trade-off and personal choice really. 26" does indeed have the greater tyre choice available. There are some great 24" tyres though: DMR bikes in UK make street, hardpack/dirtjump and more downhill-ish/loam tyres on what appears to be the just same casing with a different tread. In US you can probably get the same tyres badged differently. I have a pair of each of those, they are okay.. There's nothing super tacky available in stock in bike shops though.
     
  18. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member


    Thanks rawly We do have some Giant bikes over here.. even remember hearing of Koga.. I don't mind Taiwanese, they can do the building as wll as anyone it's all about quality control.. All the Specialised bikes bar the very very top end are Taiwanese and it works out great for the rider beause they have their quality control sorted. Still, most companies only make a steel or cro-mo frame at the very bottom of their consumer range, and I see very few of the big brands' bottom end bikes (and I "bisected" my old GT, my first MTB in 1994 lol).
    It just seems I'm living in a world flooded with "china steel" pop-to-the-shops catalogue-store bikes that aren't safe to ride as pedal-bicycles, never mind upgrading to motor-assisted. Saw one such bike for sale today, it had toptube-headtube mitring done apparantly with a hacksaw.. serious divots visible outside the weld.. then of course the matter of the welded 3-piece quill stem.. those are known to crack dropping off kerbs etc. eek! Even a lot of the alloy frames have the 3-piece quill stem since the undiscerning cager has no idea what bit is important, and they just want "aluminium" because they think it's good. I definitely do know I can get a quill stem that's not a welded job, but it's cost and the whole idea of building onto a less than ideal frame is not appealing to say the least.. I just see it like a person with brittle bone desease taking up weightlifting. I need to find a good skeleton while I'm still totalling up my build costs and haven't committed to the whole motorising deal.
    If I could find any '86 bike in good condition I'd be amazed as no one seems to value the bicycle these days.. world of cagers only want to ride once a year I guess... *shakes my head and mutters at the world* :rolleyes7:
    Anyway, sorry for my total pessimism haha I'm a glass half empty man today I guess.. bad flu (as if I'm not always like this). Thanks for your input. I'll go and Goggle your Koga bike now. :) Does it have a model name?
     
  19. FurryOnTheInside

    FurryOnTheInside Active Member


    Yeah but you can't fall off a used car and roll under the wheels of another used car so which should be valued higher? :)


    Okay, gone well off-topic I reckon lol but had to reply to your comments, it's only polite.

    I thought I just found a converter for 1&18" aheadset fork steerer to a frame meant for 1" quill steerer.. but I was mistaken.. I'm. so. gutted. :(
    but I did find a converter for a 1" quill steerer to standard modern 1&18" stem. Only it's a british store so idk if you'll find these, but maybe useful to know they exist.. (this isn't spam lol) http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/brand-x-quill-adaptor-alloy/rp-prod6254
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2013
  20. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    My main motive for 26s is readily available inexpensive
    tires,etc. A 29er is like skiing moguls on 220s; I used to do that
    a lot. Just skim the tops of the bumps.
     
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