Viper friction drive set up

Discussion in 'Friction Drive' started by wilbur, Jun 1, 2009.

  1. wilbur

    wilbur Member

    Hi .I have a viper friction drive set up from Island hopper and I was wondering if anyone has this set up?.
     

  2. eastwoodo4

    eastwoodo4 Member

    no but i am curious how the kit runs?ive been seeing them for years on motorizedfoldupbikes.com.the site says located in st pete.but when u go to it its a shop full of bikes and a mechanic who works on them.but he wouldnt let me into look at them.thats been about 2 1/2 years ago.
     
  3. wilbur

    wilbur Member

    The plus is I thought was the Tecumseh 49cc2h.p. engine ,some call it the Tecumseh 49er cause its been around awhile .It starts everytime and runs great but I guess there are better engines out there.I have been trying to find the price on this motor new but cant find one.The thing I dont like is I cant find a replacemet roller for it.I want a knurled one that grabs better.The one i have is smooth and slips unless I put alot of pressure onit.Monster scooter has a1.5 h.p. engine (item #ed1-220 that might be a good replacement when mine dies for 119.00 .Only problem is I think my clutch is smaller and it wont just pop right on.
     
  4. eastwoodo4

    eastwoodo4 Member

    i cant beleive they would sell a roller with out knurl on it.that sucks.tell u what u do.take the roller off aand go to a machinist.he can knurl it very easy.
     
  5. wilbur

    wilbur Member

    Eastwood !!!.Thats a great Idea !.I think I will do that.
     
  6. s_beaudry

    s_beaudry Member

    Or even the sand and jb welld trick I have read a few times on here...
     
  7. wilbur

    wilbur Member

    Sand and J.B. weld

    How does the sand and J.B. weld trick work?.
     
  8. loquin

    loquin Active Member

    mix sand into JBWeld & coat the roller with it. Use sandpaper first, to rough-up the surface of the roller. IMO, you would want to use the washed/screened stuff, like you would find bagged for sandboxes at walmart.

    ref this thread (found it by searching this forum for 'jb-weld')
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2009
  9. wilbur

    wilbur Member

    People do this ?Does it add vibration to the set up?.
     
  10. s_beaudry

    s_beaudry Member

    Would not vibrate any more then a knurled roller would, the tire should take away some or most of it.
     
  11. eastwoodo4

    eastwoodo4 Member

    i gotta say bs.theres no way u could balance a roller with jb weld the same as knurling it.and i would rthink that the sand would rub off and become smooth jb weld.cant hurt to try tho.
     
  12. SirJakesus

    SirJakesus Guest

    A rollers diameter is small enough that a thin coating of jb cant possibly take it noticeably off balance.

    You could also hit the roller with a bunch of little tack welds using a mig/arc/tig welder and sand a bit to get the really sharp pieces off.. This will probably last longer than JB or knurling.
     
  13. eastwoodo4

    eastwoodo4 Member

    i was stating that knurling is a perfectly machined peice.jb weld is not.theres no way they could be equal.
     
  14. Happy Valley

    Happy Valley Active Member

    Thoroughly mix the epoxy with aquarium sand and the epoxy and aggregate will wear down together. I don't use JB but a clear paste epoxy I have for other bonding jobs.
    Lay the mix out in to an even, shallow depth in a flat, narrow container and roll the spindle with one pass through the mix.
    Turn the roller 1/4 turn every 15 min. until it begins to set to prevent sag.
    There is no perceptible imbalance in the roller, the tire deflection more than compensates for any minute irregularities.
     
  15. eastwoodo4

    eastwoodo4 Member

    u guys r right.jb weld is not going to throw the balance off enough to matter.but by the time u take the roller off.get jb weld and sand.do the job.let it set up.u might as well spend ten bucks and find a machinist.thats what i meant.
     
  16. Happy Valley

    Happy Valley Active Member

    Knurling a drive spindle is certainly a good idea and offers improvement over a smooth metal surface.
    Actually, my experiments with aggregate and adhesive were more towards creating wet weather rollers and attempts at building up worn spindles.
     
  17. cpuaid

    cpuaid Member

    I have a Viper kit that I attached a sanding pad with extra strength epoxy. 500 miles later and it's still holding up. Runs well on wet road surfaces. Takes off much faster than my Staton knurled roller and doesn't really tear up the tire as I thought it should have.
     

    Attached Files:

  18. cpuaid

    cpuaid Member

    Update: Got caught in the rain 2 miles out while riding the Viper. Sanding pad drive roller got me back safely with no slipping going 15 MPH. The only problem was the stripes painted on the sides of the road being too slippery for my tires in the rain. Impressed that the Tecumseh was able to run in the rain.
     
  19. cpuaid

    cpuaid Member

    Switched the Viper bike kit to another bike with brand new road tread tires and noticed sanding roller was rapidly eating into the rubber. Apparently the new tire had softer rubber than the old Kevlar ones it replaced. My solution was to lightly take a file to the sanding pad roller and make it less abrasive.
     
  20. rustycase

    rustycase Banned

    That's amazing! I like that !!!
    A sanding pad epoxied on the roller... That's great!

    ...I was about to say get an arc welder to run a bunch of beads along the length of the roller, or even score it kinda shallow with a thin disk on an angle grinder...

    Sanding pad looks easier, and it's apparently effective. That's what counts!

    CPU, what kind of sanding pad, specifically, would you advise?

    Tnx,
    rc
     
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