Who would want us gone?

Discussion in 'Laws, Legislation & Emissions' started by grinningremlin, Feb 16, 2013.

  1. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    I have some theories, and would like some input from all the "far more intelligent than I" people on this forum.
    Who (corporations/single man business/state-federal agencies, etc) would have a vested interest in getting MAB's off the road?Money being the obvious carrot (not getting their cut), the only ways to do it are:
    1) scare us off
    2) tax us away
    3) regulate to the point of too much hassle.
    Thanks for any input
     

  2. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Well-Known Member

    Good question. i don't think there is a big group of people plotting to keep us off the road, per se. Motorcycle companies know that a lot of motorized bike riders will move up to riding their products. Manufacturers of conventional bicycles realize that we are motorizing a lot of their current products too. I think the riders that get hassled the most live in states where there just are no laws on the books to account for street use of motorized bicycles. That forces the policemen to make judgement calls. We pay plenty of tax on the gasoline we use.
     
  3. Richard H.

    Richard H. Member

    That's a leading question. It could suggest some persons or entities out to get motored bikers.
    There is no conspiracy. The whole entire MAB market is a minuscule, micro niche. The USBL reports there are 60 million bicyclists in the US who regularly use bicycles. The gas MAB market is insignificant compared to that, by my reckoning it wouldn't even total 1% of it at any moment in time.

    Also, what is meant by "us"? Gas bikes? eBikes? All MABs are not created equal. For example gas bikes, a 35cc 4 stroke rackmount on a decent bike is a whole different ballgame than a 200+cc engine jammed into a bicycle frame. One is a motor assisted bicycle, the other a fake motorcycle. It seems fairly clear to me that state agencies and LEOs would easily deduce those obvious differences as well.

    The question of legality is one largely influenced by behavior, either self-regulate or you will be regulated upon. If someone has a noisy, smoky 2 stroke and is determined to annoy the neighborhood by buzzing around all hours of the day, look to come under scrutiny.
     
  4. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    Yeah, we pose no threat to any big organization. Laws against riding motorized bikes have more to do with issues of safety and hassle-factor for cops. It's easier to outlaw m-bikes than hassle with regulating engine size, top speed, lighting, roadway, etc.
     
  5. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    I agree we are "small-potatoes", but,...
    If you didn't own an MAB, you had an apparent disdain for all things "bike" including bikers, belittling the whole endeavor; why would you frequent a motoredbikes forum?It's just a strange puzzle.There are the usual three kinds here, those that are asking questions, those helping, and those scanning info.I can't wrap my head around the anomaly of being part of a forum where the subject is silly to you, other than trying to sway others in some way.
     
  6. geebt48cc

    geebt48cc Member

    Well, the way I see it is..............."It's just a matter of time!"

    As these MB's continue to gain popularity there will be new laws set. Uno, as well as I do, that the more and more they see out on the road, it will be brought up to take further motion on MB's. ONCE AGAIN, MATTER OF TIME
     
  7. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    It comes down to statistics: when there are only 10 motorized bicycles riding around and 10% of those riders are irresponsible and reckless, then it's only a single person who is upsetting the neighbourhood.
    When 10,000 motorised bicycles are riding around, it's now 1,000 people who are upsetting the neighbourhood, and politicians are quick to jump on any law and order issue that can get them reellected to office on a law and order platform (which the public falls for every time), and that gives police the legal framework to harass and persecute the other 90,000 sensible and respectful motorized bicycle riders.
     
    BoltsMissing likes this.
  8. geebt48cc

    geebt48cc Member

    So, guess when it gets pushed to all legalities of every true motorcycle on the road, MB ers can either hang it up on the wall in man cave, or go out and buy a true blown motorcycle of there choice?!
     
  9. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    That would put the motorcycle-industry, or those who build customs on the hotlist.If held to those standards it would be easy to snip us, there are no DOT approved bike tires (that puts tire industry on the hotlist).Granted just my theories, can't even call them conspiracy-theories I'd need at least 5 in cahoots.Just hope I'm too old to see it happen.
     
  10. Richard H.

    Richard H. Member

    A good friend has done the due diligence and is nearly finished putting together a state-by-state data base on gas MAB regs in the US. A complete and up to date one btw because what we've seen available online is sketchy. (shoot a PM if you have a serious interest) A large majority of states are good with <50cc and <2 HP. I maintain and always have that threats to gas MAB legal viability will come from exceeding these practical limits, IE: making fake motorcycles. That's what happened in NY and WA state so far where gas MABs have been all but banned.
     
  11. Dankoozy

    Dankoozy Member

    Certain types of intolerant people because
    *They think motorised bikes are unusually dangerous and pose a risk to themselves or their kids
    *They don't have one, pay high tax and insurance for a car and hate to see others getting around so cheap
    *"Unruly youthes with engines on their bikes" curtain twitchers who think society has gone to hell with the youths of today
    *Environmental nuts, they read somewhere that a 2-stroke engine pollutes 50x as much as a car and took it as gospel (and they never heard of a mini 4-stroke)
    *People who hate the noise or they were stuck behind a MB on a bendy road, they will pick one or more of the above reasons to boost their case
     
  12. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Member

    There is miserable segment of the population who thinks no one should have fun and enjoy themselves. Unfortunately, some of them are politicians, whose goal is to ensure by law everyone else becomes equally miserable.
     
  13. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    That's a logical assessment Tans.I feel sorry for all those people that are "high on life", where are they gonna be when it's illegal to be high, regardless of substance?There has to be a futuristic story where it's illegal to be happy.
     
  14. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Member

    Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.

    Winston Churchill
     
  15. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    If you want to go to a place where just about everything is illegal, except paying taxes, simply emigrate to Australia.

    At least in America you can still pack up your gear and move to a different state where the things you enjoy are still legal.
     
  16. geebt48cc

    geebt48cc Member

    Understand Fabian, but in the states this MB transportation is looked as a irritant for most drivers. Uno, most, but not all think that if you're going to ride with traffic, you need to at least run 5mph over all posted speed limits ?!!~ Around here, if you can't always do that, then you better watch out. Ha, most of all MB accidents, happen trying to get out of the way of everybody else...............!! Anyway, always just looked as as a "BIGGER BOYS TOY?"

    Uno, despite of the mods and performance, they look and think......"It's still just a BICYCLE?"
     
  17. grinningremlin

    grinningremlin Active Member

    Yeah it's funny, I've had numerous Southern Californians complain about the number of bicyclists on the road, and in the same statement complain about the smog.
    Fabian, I bet there's places in the outback where you can get away with whatever, obvious problem being access to water/sundries.The desert and places where no one else wants to live are the places for me, overpopulation being a large cause of problems.If the houses are closer than a 1/2 mile apart, it's too civilized for me.
     
  18. jaguar

    jaguar Well-Known Member

    for a future of govt enslavement w/o happiness see the movie on Youtube 1984
     
  19. roughrider

    roughrider Member

    Well, I've put a couple hundred miles on my bike since last Saturday. I was concerned about how people would react to my weird machine. So far, it's been ALL positive. I've had a group of, in-shape, fast road bicyclists give me the thumbs up; a cop giving a guy a ticket looked up and smiled at me; kids, everywhere, love the bike; girls want to talk about it; at the college, I get all kinds of conversations; the guys at my favorite bike shop think its cool, and two of 'em want to build one; my Facebook friends love the bike.

    Seriously, I don't see a problem. Maybe it's where I live, but I'm finding my motobike is a great way to meet people and have fun conversations.

    I should say that I don't ride fast. I obey the laws. I wear a helmet. I have quality lights. I'm really careful. I try to keep the noise down in neighborhoods. I have motorcycle license. Except for this one time California registration, I'm completely legal... In other words, I try to be a socially conscious citizen.

    Er, well, actually, now that I think of it, I DID get some people give me dirty looks when I was riding on a bike path in one of the parks. I was trying to get to the bluffs by the river so I could test the bike on some really steep hills. In all honesty, I think they were right. The signs DID say "No motorized vehicles." (There's an exemption for electric vehicles for the disabled.) So I shoulda shut the motor off then.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2013
  20. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Member


    When we lfirst moved to Alaska in 1969, our nearest neighbor was 6 miles away. But it didn't last, three years later two friends with their families from Arizona moved up and bought land on either side of us. Then other people began moving in, when we came outside in 1976, hell, it was practically a village by then.

    http://hstrial-rchambers.homestead.com/untitled2.html

    http://hstrial-rchambers.homestead.com/Index.html
     
    Dankoozy likes this.
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