Zen and the Art of MB Riding...

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by jared3377, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. jared3377

    jared3377 Member


    Inspiring ride-philosophy passage from Robert Pirsig, Minnesota-born author, philosopher, and biker:



    "You see things vacationing on a motorcycle in a way that is completely different from any other. In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV. You're a passive observer and it is all moving by you boringly in a frame.

    On a cycle the frame is gone. You're completely in contact with it all. You're in the scene, not just watching it anymore, and the sense of presence is overwhelming. That concrete whizzing by five inches below your foot is the real thing, the same stuff you walk on, but so blurred you can't focus on it, yet you can put your foot down and touch it anytime, and the whole thing, the whole experience, is never removed from immediate consciousness."


    --from Zen, and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
     

  2. Simon_A

    Simon_A Member

    Love that quote.
     
  3. bigsugar999

    bigsugar999 New Member

    The Power of Myth

    "Anyone who has had an experience of mystery knows that there is a dimension of the universe that is not that which is available to his senses. There is a pertinent saying in one of the Upanishads: When before the beauty of a sunset or of a mountain you pause and exclaim, 'Ah,' you are participating in divinity. Such a moment of participation involves a realization of the wonder and sheer beauty of existence. People living in the world of nature experience such moments every day. They live in the recognition of something there that is much greater than the human dimension. "

    -Joseph Campbell, The Power of Myth
     
  4. jlebh1

    jlebh1 Member

    thankyou for that wonderful quote just makes me relax from a long day at work.

    thankyou very much do you know where I can get that book?
     
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