420 Chain for 66cc bike



Tony01

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Jun 21, 2016
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Generally speaking, 2 digit chains are for slow industrial purposes, 3 digit chains are for powersports. Buy a quality 415 or the $20 version 420 from your local MC shop. 41 chain is crap.
 

Tyler6357

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Generally speaking, 2 digit chains are for slow industrial purposes, 3 digit chains are for powersports. Buy a quality 415 or the $20 version 420 from your local MC shop. 41 chain is crap.
The Wippermann 1R8 chain is a BMX chain that is 1/2 x 1/8. It has a breaking load of 12,500 Newton. It has nickle plated reinforced links, it is not crap.
 

FNTPuck

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Generally speaking, 2 digit chains are for slow industrial purposes, 3 digit chains are for powersports. Buy a quality 415 or the $20 version 420 from your local MC shop. 41 chain is crap.
41 chain is popular on gokarts that make triple the hp and double the RPM of a motorized bicycle all the while being installed in heavier vehicles. It is cheap, light, and lasts forever.

Not exactly "crap"...its better than a 415 in every way.
 

Tony01

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41 chain is popular on gokarts that make triple the hp and double the RPM of a motorized bicycle all the while being installed in heavier vehicles. It is cheap, light, and lasts forever.

Not exactly "crap"...its better than a 415 in every way.
No, 35 chain is the most popular on karts, followed by 219, followed by shifters that run 530... I worked in a karting shop and I’ve never seen a 41 on anything with an engine. we didn’t even sell 41. You are probably thinking of 40 chain which is much heavier duty than 41 and sized for a thicker sprocket.

The Wippermann 1R8 chain is a BMX chain that is 1/2 x 1/8. It has a breaking load of 12,500 Newton. It has nickle plated reinforced links, it is not crap.
That would be a 410 chain. Too thin inside.
 
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CrazyDan

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I run a shift kit and the torque is outrageous on the chain from the jackshaft to the pedals. 41, 415 and 420 are not an option because of clearances. I stretched out chain after chain till I came across kmc h710. I don't run the halflink version, although I should have. I have 0 chain issues now.
That would be a 410 chain. Too thin inside.
Too thin my ass. You might be talking from experience from 30 years ago. There are some hella beefy 410 chains out there now. If I ever have issues with my 710 chain (also a 410) then I'm trying out one of the connex chains made for ebikes.
 

FNTPuck

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No, 35 chain is the most popular on karts, followed by 219, followed by shifters that run 530... I worked in a karting shop and I’ve never seen a 41 on anything with an engine. we didn’t even sell 41. You are probably thinking of 40 chain which is much heavier duty than 41 and sized for a thicker sprocket.


That would be a 410 chain. Too thin inside.
No clue where your karting shop is but I have never seen any kart or custom fab shop NOT sell 41 chain. There are a lot of 41 chains in motorsports and some of the most popular brands like manco and yerf both have karts that come stock with 41 chain.

"#35, 40, 41, 420 and 50 chain are used on American Go Karts and Mini Bikes. "

I use 41 chain on a big bore briggs with 16ft-lbs of TQ and a 40 series torque converter that hits HARD and no issues. Better clearance on the wide tire than 415, while also being stronger. Damn thing wants to twist the frame on the hit even with all the reinforcements but the chain holds fine and hasn't warped or stretched.

For a 2stroke, there are plenty of 410 chains that are more than strong enough. You want the lightest chain that can handle your power - heavier is just more rotating mass and parasitic loss. I raced 1000cc literbikes and a common mod is to go DOWN in chain size from a 530 to a 520, which will show an actual hp increase on the dyno of ~2hp on a ZX10r.
 

FurryOnTheInside

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You have many different chains to choose from and many reasonable reasons for choosing them. None of these reasons are it's breaking strength under tension. ☝😾

Rant begins! 😝🍺
You can run nine speed derailleur chain with your tandem mountain bike with two muscle dudes stomping uphill in lowest gear and it'll be strong enough. You can run the same piddly little nine speed derailleur chain on your little China Girl too. I do!
You can run 3/16" narrow bmx racing/ single speed chain or 1/8" standard bmx freestyle chain on a highly modded brand name 69cc bicycle engine and it'll be strong enough, many of our members do this.
Use any chain you like but it's pointless to debate about what is the strongest size chain between a #415 and #41 because its completely irrelevant. They're both massively overkill, strength wise. 😤

Quality is relevant. The width of your sprockets and whether you want to alter that is relevant. The clearance with other bike parts like stays and the clutch cam housing "sprocket cover" is relevant. The resilience in malfunction situations, as completely distinct from the chain's "strength" or breaking strain as designed, is relevant. Cool motorcycle look is as relevant as you want it to be. The lateral stiffness is definitely relevant, God knows my nine speed derailleur chain is not laterally stiff lol its like an epileptic eel! 🤭
We have plenty of variables to debate that affect how well / strongly / reliably our bikes drivetrains run. Quality clearly matters looking at the previous post. 😖

Also rant continues! 🤪🍺
What is this about a chain lasting years on a sprocket? Special chain that doesn't wear, or wear the sprocket?
I mean there's different ideas of what "runs", depending on how low your standards are. Someone else's idea of "running" could be completely different from my own. 

Sorry that was a bit of a rant. I saw a spider and tried to swat it with a fin (I know) and I missed and jumped off the ladder and hurt my toe. 🍺🤫

The point was there somewhere..
Chain wears sprockets, and with sprockets, and from sprockets. The crappy eccentric or alloy sprockets we have, too! Everything is bound to wear quickly.
You can run the chains and sprockets in sequence to extend the lifetime of your drive train parts. You just have to check wear and rotate parts when you're doing the routine maintenance.
Some people do run the same one set of chain and sprockets together until the chain skips no matter how much you tension it. That's the lowest amount of maintenance you can do but also the lowest miles per dollar before failure or unacceptably poor running. I do that with my electric bike that has the motor in the hub!
I believe we can get more miles of smooth running for each $ spent by rotating parts. See what wears more and use more of them. Chain, definitely. Idk what the alloy sprockets are like as I use bicycle parts.
I hope you would look at these things when you are maintaining your bike, that you would not actually literally leave the chain on the engine sprocket for the last few thousand miles and never see the sprocket uncovered and cleaned so you can inspect it, even if you run only one set of drive train parts at a time.
 
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