49mm Steel Sleeve --- She Rips!!

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Sidewinder Jerry

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It's not about safety for me when I choose the sidewalk when it's a viable option in such scenarios... it's about respect for those folks behind me.
A MB that can do 30 mph shouldn't be that big of a hindrance to traffic. On roads with a 55 mph speed limit, while driving a car; I've been able to pass pedal only cyclist in less than a minute.
 

Risk Man

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In Florida, your motor bike is either a "Moped" ( not going to define it here but you can look it up less than 50 CC and 2 BHP and less than 30MPH) or a motorcycle. The lane control or right side of lane operation is defined:

316.208 Motorcycles and mopeds.—
(1) Any person operating a motorcycle or moped shall be granted all of the rights and shall be subject to all of the duties applicable to the driver of any other vehicle under this chapter, except as to special regulations in this chapter and except as to those provisions of this chapter which by their nature can have no application.
(2)(a) Any person operating a moped upon a roadway at less than the normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under the conditions then existing shall ride as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway except under any of the following situations:
1. When overtaking or passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction.
2. When preparing for a left turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway.
3. When reasonably necessary to avoid any condition, including, but not limited to, a fixed or moving object, parked or moving vehicle, bicycle, pedestrian, animal, surface hazard, or substandard-width lane, that makes it unsafe to continue along the right-hand curb or edge. For purposes of this paragraph, a “substandard-width lane” is a lane that is too narrow for a moped and another vehicle to travel safely side by side within the lane.
(b) Any person operating a moped upon a one-way highway with two or more marked traffic lanes may ride as near the left-hand curb or edge of such roadway as practicable.
(3) A person propelling a moped solely by human power upon and along a sidewalk, or across a roadway upon and along a crosswalk, has all the rights and duties applicable to a pedestrian under the same circumstances, except that such person shall yield the right-of-way to any pedestrian and shall give an audible signal before overtaking and passing a pedestrian.
(4) No person shall propel a moped upon and along a sidewalk while the motor is operating.
 

Sidewinder Jerry

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In Florida, your motor bike is either a "Moped" ( not going to define it here but you can look it up less than 50 CC and 2 BHP and less than 30MPH) or a motorcycle. The lane control or right side of lane operation is defined:

316.208 Motorcycles and mopeds.—
(1) Any person operating a motorcycle or moped shall be granted all of the rights and shall be subject to all of the duties applicable to the driver of any other vehicle under this chapter, except as to special regulations in this chapter and except as to those provisions of this chapter which by their nature can have no application.
(2)(a) Any person operating a moped upon a roadway at less than the normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under the conditions then existing shall ride as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway except under any of the following situations:
1. When overtaking or passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction.
2. When preparing for a left turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway.
3. When reasonably necessary to avoid any condition, including, but not limited to, a fixed or moving object, parked or moving vehicle, bicycle, pedestrian, animal, surface hazard, or substandard-width lane, that makes it unsafe to continue along the right-hand curb or edge. For purposes of this paragraph, a “substandard-width lane” is a lane that is too narrow for a moped and another vehicle to travel safely side by side within the lane.
(b) Any person operating a moped upon a one-way highway with two or more marked traffic lanes may ride as near the left-hand curb or edge of such roadway as practicable.
(3) A person propelling a moped solely by human power upon and along a sidewalk, or across a roadway upon and along a crosswalk, has all the rights and duties applicable to a pedestrian under the same circumstances, except that such person shall yield the right-of-way to any pedestrian and shall give an audible signal before overtaking and passing a pedestrian.
(4) No person shall propel a moped upon and along a sidewalk while the motor is operating.
(2)(a) Any person operating a moped upon a roadway at less than the normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under the conditions then existing shall ride as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway except under any of the following situations:

This applies to lanes wide enough for Lane Sharing not to Lanes not wide enough for Lane Sharing.
 

TheWizzerd

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I don't know where "Here" is for you but the Far Right Law only applies to Wide Lanes in the USA. If a Lane isn't wide enough for a vehicle to pass you by 3 feet without changing lanes then a cyclist has the right to use the entire lane. In lanes not wide enough for Lane Sharing the safest place for a cyclist in the center of the lane, this is known as Lane Control.

Yes, that may be according to federal law, but states and local municipalities are allowed to "strengthen" the laws and create ordinances that extend that law.

"Here" Is Indiana.

The laws vary greatly depending where you live and "Here in the USA" is inadequate.


The "motorcycle" thing depends where you live. Here, we have specific "motor driven cycle" laws, which yes, its entirely semantics as "motor driven cycle" IS a motorcycle, but what they classify as a motor driven cycle is NOT the same as what they classify as a motorcycle.

Motor driven cycle operation specific laws here, but normal traffic laws still apply.

15 years of age
Helmet and eye protection required if under 18
Must operate astride the seat
Passengers are not allowed
Headlamps on while in operation, even in daylight
Hands must remain on grips. Cannot carry anything in hand
No interstate or sidewalk use
Maximum speed of 35mph

Operate near right-hand edge of roadway unless passing another vehicle or preparing for left turn <-- That is the extent of the law as it pertains to MDC's. You are not legally allowed to ride center lane regardless of what its called or referred to as in other legal or non legal language. While you can choose to do what you want and what makes you feel safer when riding, when it came to the courtroom, the letter of the law wouldn't care about your subjectivities on safety.

I fully understand this!!!


In the vast majority of places, even if there are no motorized bike specific laws, the majority of them in use are technically illegal from a motor vehicle equipment point of view, let alone the conditions many of them meet engine specification and operation wise.


Also, cycling is not common in my more rural area. The vast majority of drivers around here do not expect there to be bikes on the road. It is quite different than riding in an area where bikes are quite common. We do not have bike lanes, and barely any shoulder on most of the roads where I would ride.....rural county roads. Only reason I would ride on a busier road was to stay in, or avoid certain traffic patterns to stay away from as many cars as I can...or of course crossing them to get to where I am going if need be.

Cyclists are a bother to most drivers here and honestly feel they shouldn't be able to share the road. Some of them would seemingly just rather hit you and get it over with.

For the same reasons laws vary depending on state/region, your operating condition may be different than someone elses. Stating what one should or should not do really isnt the place of any one of us. They should read their local laws, understand them, and ride in a manner thats safest for them without putting others at risk.
 

Sidewinder Jerry

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If a lane is 14 feet or wider then cyclist Mopeds and MB'ers are required to ride to the far right. If a lane is less than 14 feet wide then a cyclist, moped, or MB'er has the right to use the entire lane. This exists everywhere in the USA regardless of what state you're in.

The average lane on most USA roads is around 11 feet wide. Most large cars and pickup trucks are around 7 feet wide; the average cyclist, moped rider, or MB'er can be up to 3 feet wide. Then add in a 3-foot clearance. This then becomes simple math and common sense.

The purpose of the Far Right Law and Lane Sharing is so that slower-moving vehicles don't hinder faster-moving vehicles. This is accomplished by the faster-moving vehicle not having to change lanes to pass a slower-moving 2 or 3-wheeled vehicle and still clear the bike/trike by 3 feet.

In an 11-foot lane, a passing vehicle will have to wait for the lane left of them to be clear to pass a bike/trike/moped and clear them by 3 feet. Sadly, many won't do this and will try to do a squeeze-by if the person is riding to the far right. If they use Lane Control then the passing vehicle has to completely change lanes to pass.
 

TheWizzerd

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If a lane is 14 feet or wider then cyclist Mopeds and MB'ers are required to ride to the far right. If a lane is less than 14 feet wide then a cyclist, moped, or MB'er has the right to use the entire lane. This exists everywhere in the USA regardless of what state you're in.

The average lane on most USA roads is around 11 feet wide. Most large cars and pickup trucks are around 7 feet wide; the average cyclist, moped rider, or MB'er can be up to 3 feet wide. Then add in a 3-foot clearance. This then becomes simple math and common sense.

The purpose of the Far Right Law and Lane Sharing is so that slower-moving vehicles don't hinder faster-moving vehicles. This is accomplished by the faster-moving vehicle not having to change lanes to pass a slower-moving 2 or 3-wheeled vehicle and still clear the bike/trike by 3 feet.

In an 11-foot lane, a passing vehicle will have to wait for the lane left of them to be clear to pass a bike/trike/moped and clear them by 3 feet. Sadly, many won't do this and will try to do a squeeze-by if the person is riding to the far right. If they use Lane Control then the passing vehicle has to completely change lanes to pass.
I totally understand what you are saying.

You are not understanding what I, as well as Indiana law states, which are requirements specific to Motor Driven Cycles.

As stated above, Motor Driven Cycles must ---> Operate near right-hand edge of roadway unless passing another vehicle or preparing for left turn.

This is a recent law that was built on top of any existing cycling laws that I am quite sure were considered when they wrote this one. They passed this law specifically for MDC's, which takes precedent over general cycling laws while operating a MDC.

Your interpretation or lack of acknowledgement that the law exists here that you cannot ride center lane on what my state classifies as a Motor Driven Cycle, leads me to assume you would ignore it, knowing that you would personally feel safer doing so because you subjectively know it to be safer to do so. Safe to assume?
 

Sidewinder Jerry

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It is you who aren't understanding what the Indiana or any other state Far Right and Lane Sharing law is and why it was written.

These laws say to ride to the far right as safely (Practicable) as possible. You can't ride to the far right on an 11-foot wide road and be safe (Practicable) and at the same time not hinder faster-moving traffic.
 

TheWizzerd

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It is you who aren't understanding what the Indiana or any other state Far Right and Lane Sharing law is and why it was written.

These laws say to ride to the far right as safely (Practicable) as possible. You can't ride to the far right on an 11-foot wide road and be safe (Practicable) and at the same time not hinder faster-moving traffic.
I understand the law as it is clearly written as it pertains to MDC's in Indiana.

What is there not to understand about.....

Operate near right-hand edge of roadway unless passing another vehicle or preparing for left turn.


That is the absolute extent of the law as it pertains to MDC's here. No ifs, and's or but's about it. That is exactly, word for word how it is written and cannot be interpreted any other way.

The only references to other sections of the law as it pertains to MDC's is to the general motor vehicle equipment laws. The general cycling laws do not apply the same universally to motorized bicycles everywhere in the states, and are not referenced anywhere in the Indiana MDC laws.

I am not sure if you've noticed, but we are not talking about pure pedal power bicycles here. Neither are many of the laws which have been exclusively written for motorized bicycles. They do not fall under the same laws as pure pedal power bikes in many places. Do some of them apply in many places, sure, and many of them do here as well. But its quite clear the far right rule has been tailored differently for MDC's.
 

DAMIEN1307

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I have seen that this "discussion" is turning into nothing more than another fruitless argument and waste of forum time and effort and am now locking this thread from any further replies...DAMIEN

Ps...Ukraine is the "war zone" at the moment, NOT the forums...lol.
 
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